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Brain Changes from Modular?
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Modular Synth General Discussion Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next [all]
Author Brain Changes from Modular?
odonamon
Do you think playing Modular Synth has changed your brain or thinking in a noticable way?

Was emailing with Steve Roach a while ago and he had this to say:

“Glad your loving the modualr, it creates new pathways in the brain, this is fact.”

So just curious, have you noticed anything different after playing modular synths for a while?

Hit me with the good, the bad and the ugly. ( but I have a feeling mods can bring a sort of inner peace by forcing one to ‘listen’ for changes instead of just hearing music which is a sort of meditation I’m thinking... not sure would love any input here)

I recently saw magic Mushrooms can create new pathways in the brain and help with PTSD and depression. If there is similar action with all of this then Maybe Modular Syrh is a mental Medicine in a way...

So what do you think? Do mods change your brain?
mskala
In an ultra-literal sense, learning or doing anything changes your brain because that's how brains operate. But I don't think there is anything particularly special or meaningful about the way playing a modular synth changes your brain. That's woo on the same level as "you don't use 90% of your brain."
Pelsea
See Daniel J Levitin; “This is Your Brain on Music”.
wiperactive
I doubt it if modulars can re-wire the brain in any radical sense... something the world as a whole, no doubt, could do with from our species... though I'm finding that as I move into this open-all-channels modular world in parallel with the comparatively restricted confines of fixed signal path and semi-modular synths, a loosening up of approach is taking hold which can sometimes usefully be fed back into the non-modular world or even into other areas.

For example I have a DSI Pro 2, which is admittedly, virtually a modular in disguise, but it still tends to tilt you into old habits of approach because of its immediate format and appearance. I'm now finding that certain kinds of modular exploration, which may not of so readily occurred to me on the Pro 2, can often be 'ported' over to that synth but with the added facility of a recall button.

So yeah, I think modulars can encourage relatively modest, but significant shifts in mentation when applied to the synth world, but sometimes, also a little bit beyond. I find modulars to be constructively anarchistic in their nature.
wiperactive
Pelsea wrote:
See Daniel J Levitin; “This is Your Brain on Music”.


Read that several years ago, maybe it's time to take another look at it.
GuyaGuy
It activates the purchase-promoting neurotransmitters in the brain.
wiperactive
GuyaGuy wrote:
It activates the purchase-promoting neurotransmitters in the brain.


Yeah that as well, something I'm experiencing anew and wrestling with, though I try to offset it a little with a degree of DIY and make do and mend attitude help hihi
authorless
mskala wrote:
In an ultra-literal sense, learning or doing anything changes your brain because that's how brains operate. But I don't think there is anything particularly special or meaningful about the way playing a modular synth changes your brain. That's woo on the same level as "you don't use 90% of your brain."


Yep.
cptnal
Learning any musical instrument can help lower your risk of dementia, and reinforces connections as discussed above. Does modular change your brain/thinking differently from anything else? Perhaps. There are problem-solving elements, judgements and decisions being made pretty much constantly... The problem is how could you possibly measure the effect empirically? There's no such thing as "a modular" - every one is different. So you'd be comparing apples with orangutans. hmmm.....
electricanada
A surprising number of dudes become chicks after playing with modular.
Keltie
odonamon wrote:
Do you think playing Modular Synth has changed your brain


Well I don’t know about anyone else but it’s pretty much fucking scrambled mine spinning
wsy
electricanada wrote:
A surprising number of dudes become chicks after playing with modular.


You notice that too? Kinda freaky, if you ask me.

'scuse me, gotta put on my flannel shirt and chop down trees.

- Bill
desolationjones
wsy wrote:
electricanada wrote:
A surprising number of dudes become chicks after playing with modular.


You notice that too? Kinda freaky, if you ask me.

'scuse me, gotta put on my flannel shirt and chop down trees.

- Bill

It's not contagious, you fucking mook.
argfargl
remember Wendy Carlos! On the east coast, at the very least, trans women were there at the founding of modular synthesis and have been integral to the art and technology ever since. Inspiring IMO applause
Rex Coil 7
I say it all depends on the person. Some people don't really think in much of an "if/then" way, and using a modular may create new ways of problem solving for folks like that.

I learned to think in a different way when I became well versed in "crisis rehearsal" which has provided many benefits that I've learned to adapt to mostly everything I do or create.

Some activities evolve into deeply positive mental operations that can shape the way a person solves problems. The human brain is a problem solving machine, the ways it may be improved completely depend on a given person's past, contrasted against how they learn to manage what comes ahead.

cool
Rex Coil 7
argfargl wrote:
remember Wendy Carlos! On the east coast, at the very least, trans women were there at the founding of modular synthesis and have been integral to the art and technology ever since. Inspiring IMO applause
What in hell does "being trans" have to do with how modular synths change the way one thinks? The two things are completely mutually exclusive.

Besides, you've got it backwards ... you're implying that being trans has some magical influence on the creation of music and use of modular synths. The question posed by the OP is about how modular synths influence people. I present the opening post as evidence ....

odonamon wrote:
Do you think playing Modular Synth has changed your brain or thinking in a noticable way? ....

....So what do you think? Do mods change your brain?


Keith Emerson was a massive influence on the use of modular synths to expand the art ... and he was most certainly not a trans woman.

You're virtue signalling.

meh

electricanada wrote:
A surprising number of dudes become chicks after playing with modular.
My money says they were already feeling they were women long before they obtained access to a modular synth. It may be something about the way people like that think that attracts them to something that provides them with utmost control over how the instrument is configured and how they can reshape that instrument into anything they desire. Perhaps the modular is some sort of "avatar" (or emotional metphor) of themselves. As in "reconfigurable into another state".

cool
Balrogk
Some facts found on the net.
Neuroscientists are discovering multiple ways that musical training improves the function and connectivity of different brain regions. Musical training increases brain volume and strengthens communication between brain areas. Playing an instrument changes how the brain interprets and integrates a wide range of sensory information, especially for those who start before age 7. These findings were presented at the Neuroscience 2013 conference in San Diego.
Neuroimaging studies have shown that music engages a large-scale bilateral network of temporal, frontal, parietal, cerebellar, and limbic/paralimbic brain areas that are associated with perception of complex acoustic features, such as melody and timbre (Alluri et al., 2012), syntactic and semantic processing (Koelsch & Siebel, 2005), attention and working memory (Janata, Tillmann, & Bharucha, 2002), episodic and semantic memory (Janata, 2009), motor and rhythm processing (Zatorre, Chen, & Penhune, 2007), and experiencing emotions and reward (Koelsch, 2010). Psychologically, music has an important role in emotional self-regulation, communication, and social interaction throughout life, also during aging (Juslin & Sloboda, 2011). Common musical activities, such as music listening and singing, can contribute to positive aging by increasing emotional well-being, maintaining competence, and reducing social isolation (Hays & Minichiello, 2005). In healthy older persons, music listening can temporarily enhance attention and memory (Mammarella, Fairfield, & Cornoldi, 2007; Thompson, Moulin, Hayre, & Jones, 2005), and regular musical hobbies, such as singing and instrument playing, have been associated with better well-being (Cohen et al., 2006) and cognitive functioning (Bugos, Perlstein, McCrae, Brophy, & Bedenbaugh, 2007; Hanna-Pladdy & MacKay, 2011; Kattenstroth, Kolankowska, Kalisch, & Dinse, 2010; Parbery-Clark, Strait, Anderson, Hittner, & Kraus, 2011; Zendel & Alain, 2012), as well as with a reduced risk of developing dementia (Verghese et al., 2003).
https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/~w3psygs/SchellenbergWeissPoM.pdf
Three Brain Benefits of Musical Training: Musicians have an enhanced ability to integrate sensory information from hearing, touch, and sight. The age at which musical training begins affects brain anatomy as an adult; beginning training before the age of seven has the greatest impact. Brain circuits involved in musical improvisation are shaped by systematic training, leading to less reliance on working memory and more extensive connectivity within the brain.
"Musicians are able to ignore the auditory stimuli and only report what they are feeling," Roy said, adding "that this is solid evidence of an improved ability to process information from more than one sense at the same time."
a January 2013 study titled “Early Musical Training and White-Matter Plasticity in the Corpus Callosum: Evidence for a Sensitive Period” published in the Journal of Neuroscience earlier this year reported that musical training before age 7 helped brain development. Children who started taking music lessons early had better connections across the corpus callosum which connects the left and right hemispheres of the cerebrum.

A variety of studies have suggested that early training might be related to greater amounts of white matter in the corpus callosum. This study compared white-matter organization using diffusion tensor imaging in early- and late-trained musicians matched for years of training and experience.
I had also read that MRI studies have shown that the frontal lobe, where right/wrong decisions occur, is on "pause" so to speak,during composing
All I know is my synapses are synapin alot more since discovering Modular Synth
nigel
wsy wrote:
'scuse me, gotta put on my flannel shirt and chop down trees.

Then eat your lunch and go to the lavatory, one would hope.
electricanada
desolationjones wrote:
wsy wrote:
electricanada wrote:
A surprising number of dudes become chicks after playing with modular.


You notice that too? Kinda freaky, if you ask me.

'scuse me, gotta put on my flannel shirt and chop down trees.

- Bill

It's not contagious, you fucking mook.


That's up for debate, but probably off-topic here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Behavioral_contagion
starthief
Modular helped me realize just how much bias there is in things like the design of MIDI. There are a lot of basic notions about music that people accept as laws, and they can't see past them.

Music requires structure (otherwise it's not "organized sound" but just "sound"). But not necessarily that specific structure, that much structure, or the same structure every time.
Flareless
nigel wrote:
wsy wrote:
'scuse me, gotta put on my flannel shirt and chop down trees.

Then eat your lunch and go to the lavatory, one would hope.


applause

Followed up by a little shopping (providing it's Wednesday)...
Nagasaki45
Since I started playing on a modular synth I'm introducing filters (yes, the ones that filter out frequencies) to solve lots of unrelated tasks: Detecting head nods of avatars in social VR. Detecting who is the speaker in a conversation based on audio data. And so on...
MarcelP
Flareless wrote:
nigel wrote:
wsy wrote:
'scuse me, gotta put on my flannel shirt and chop down trees.

Then eat your lunch and go to the lavatory, one would hope.


applause

Followed up by a little shopping (providing it's Wednesday)...


Mmmm - buttered scones for tea, lovely.
sduck
Ok folks, let's please squelch the trans aspect of this discussion, or this thread will get locked. Sorry.
maltemark
My brain was made into a rock due to being so close to control voltage all the time. Thus, the other way around. Modular makes your brain un-changing.
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