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CLK signal question?
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Modular Synth General Discussion  
Author CLK signal question?
ncoded
What does a clock signal "look" like?

Is it a regular gate? What rate creates the bpm? every 16th? every beat?

what happens if the gate isn't regular?

so could i use a regular gate as a CLK signal?

is this like a square wave with a small pulse width?

noob problems here lol

peace
milkshake
A clock signal can be ANYTHING that goes from zero voltage OR below, to a higher voltage.

That means it doesn't have to be a regular gate or regular pulse train. Normally it does have a regular timing, but this is the modular world anything goes.
BPM is quarter notes per minute. 16th notes are 4 times faster.

If the pulse width is not regular and you input that to an envelope, you get groovy. Try it.
You can use an lfo with variable pulse width as clock and an other lfo to modulate the pulse width.

The term "gate" is commonly used as one of the outputs of a keyboard, sequencer or midi to cv/gate converter. And yes, you can use this as clock signal.
ncoded
kl thanks for the info. i think i gettit grin
Zentrix
Typically clock signal is some variation of a pulse wave or square wave. This is what most clock outputs will look like if you were to plug them into an oscilloscope. The pulse width may vary.


Classic MIDI clock is 24ppqn... so for every quarter note there are 24 pulses.
More modern eurorack designs are usually using 1 pulse per "step"... sometimes this means 1/4 note sometimes this means 1/16th note, although this is also relative I guess... depending on how you phrase/parse the sequence.
jorg
MIDI's 24ppq actually was based on an earlier modular-ish 24ppq sync signal for drum machines and sequencers; I think that idea came from Roland. So we've gone full-circle!

In my system, I have a MIDI input module that outputs the MIDI clock (if present). It can be programmed to divide it down to 16ppq or 1ppq.
JohnLRice
milkshake wrote:
BPM is quarter notes per minute.
Well, to be technical (hides) hihi BPM = Beats Per Minute and that only equates to quarter notes per minute if the time signature is n/4.
milkshake
JohnLRice wrote:
milkshake wrote:
BPM is quarter notes per minute.
Well, to be technical (hides) hihi BPM = Beats Per Minute and that only equates to quarter notes per minute if the time signature is n/4.


I stand corrected.
And full of shame.
JohnLRice
milkshake wrote:
JohnLRice wrote:
milkshake wrote:
BPM is quarter notes per minute.
Well, to be technical (hides) hihi BPM = Beats Per Minute and that only equates to quarter notes per minute if the time signature is n/4.


I stand corrected.
And full of shame.

Now I feel full of shame for causing another shame . . . . sad banana Dead Banana
kcd06
Something you might not yet appreciate is that in modular land, unlike digital computing or networks, the world does not come to a crashing halt if the clock rate is irregular. Or have competing clocks operating at different rates.

One style of sequencer--called a step sequencer--will output only gate signals; units such as the Moon Modular 563 and 568, or the tiptop audio circadian rhythms. Normally they are used to program events for percussion as they do not output a control voltage (CV) which would provide pitch control. But, you can plug the gate output of a step sequencer into the clock input of a full function sequencer, and then get not only pitch modulation (through the CV output of the second sequencer), but also vary the duration of each note or step (by programming the first sequencer.)
snercle
yeah the best thing about analog clocks is you can use just about anything as a clock signal if you gain it up high enough / set the threshold right on an audio > trigger converter Rockin' Banana!
milkshake
JohnLRice wrote:
milkshake wrote:
JohnLRice wrote:
milkshake wrote:
BPM is quarter notes per minute.
Well, to be technical (hides) hihi BPM = Beats Per Minute and that only equates to quarter notes per minute if the time signature is n/4.


I stand corrected.
And full of shame.

Now I feel full of shame for causing another shame . . . . sad banana Dead Banana


Just to clarify, I new the correct answer but didn't provide it. Hence my shame.
There's no shame in admitting a mistake. And there is no shame in politely correcting a mistake, as you did.
Drakhe
Just wanted to add that indeed anything going from 0 to a higher voltage can be used as a clock. Whether it works as a clock depends more on the receiving module and what it wants to see, so not all signals will work for all modules. For instance when a module expects to see a particular voltage as clock, if your clock signal does not reach said voltage it wont work. Also some modules may need a minimum gate length to work, so those will not work with triggers as clock. In such case you can still use your signal as clock but you'll need some utility to massage it into what the target module needs ...
Stides
Also wanted to add that on some devices I’ve seen that if the pulse isn’t narrow enoughyou can end up with 2 signals. One at the beginning of the pulse and one at the end. This is because sometimes tou have a little rise on the trailing edge. This will cause some devices to seem like the rate is multiplied.
dthorn
Gates and clocks can also be used as CVs when attenuated. Use a VC LFO as your main clock, mult its square output to a clock divider that outputs gates (not short triggers) and patch the divider's /2 output back to the LFO's CV input via an attenuator. The LFO will now swing by an amount set by the attenuator.

...Then patch some of the divider's other outputs to a DC coupled mixer and patch the output from that to a VCO (or any other voice element with a CV input) and you now have a strange little CV "sequencer" with adjustable swing.
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