MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index
 FAQ & Terms of UseFAQ & Terms Of Use   Wiggler RadioMW Radio   Muff Wiggler TwitterTwitter   Support the site @ PatreonPatreon 
 SearchSearch   RegisterSign up   Log inLog in 
WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

2019 Piano Advice
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> General Gear  
Author 2019 Piano Advice
wavecircle
Hi folks,

I have kind of lost touch with "conventional" music since getting deeper and deeper into electronic music over the past 20ish years. I used to love playing the piano and I have realised how much I miss playing by watching all these great young jazz/soul/funk musicians on youtube. The likes of Robert Glasper and Cory Henry are so inspirational in the way they play, if I could do 1% of that I would be so happy. I think getting back into piano would also improve my modular stuff to some extent.

So! I would like to get a good electric piano, something with great stock sounds but with some sound manipulation. The nord stage/electro/pianos are very tempting but €€€. If they are the best they might be worth it. Any other highly recommended options? I used to have a Gem Promega 3 and a Yamaha P250, both were nice but that was over 10 years ago.
spikysimon
I guess it depends on budget, but if I were after a stage piano now I’d definitely be checking out the newish Yamaha CP88. There’s a good overview here from Woody’s piano shack
wavecircle
spikysimon wrote:
I guess it depends on budget, but if I were after a stage piano now I’d definitely be checking out the newish Yamaha CP88. There’s a good overview here from Woody’s piano shack


Oh man, that looks slick and about 1k less than a nord stage (that does admittedly include a nord lead A1 built in though).

It kind of reminds me of the Roland RD2000 which I was quite impressed by but I do prefer the action on a Yamaha generally.
calaveras
no way dude. Get two turntables. Thats the piano of the modern era.
rowsbywoof
Yamaha CP88 is great to play on. Was messing around with one for quite a while at my local music store and was really impressed with how it felt. Like you, I too tend to like the action on Yamahas... as a former piano player myself, it just feels... right. Very expressive and a real joy to play.
minimalist
I am thinking of an electric piano later in the year and am looking at the following, some which you may not have considered:

Vintage Rhodes / Wurlitzer: Lovely things and sound great. You have to want that sound and be prepared for the maintenance. As much as I would like one, I will probably go for something more versatile and less fragile.
http://chicagoelectricpiano.com/

Crumar Seven: Most of the pros of vintage plus additional voices and effects. It looks the part too and I think I could put it in my living room without it looking out of place.
https://www.crumar.it

Studiologic Sledge Black Edition: A leftfield choice but there are good piano and electric piano sample packs on the Studiologic website. Check out the link for some demos.
On top of this it is also a bi-timbral 24 voice knobby 3 osc VA and wave-table synth. I personally think it looks great in black and the price is good. Would work well in a living room or studio.
https://www.studiologic-music.com/products/sledge-black-edition/

Interestingly, both of these last two options are Italian.
Rex Coil 7
The new Yamahas for sure. Kurzweil also makes really great stage pianos. Personally I like the sound of the Yamahas better. If only I could afford one of the original CP-70 Electric Grands .... oh yea. The sound of 1970s Kansas .. and of course the sound of "Rendezvoux 6:02" by UK.

Yummy Pie!


applause
Neo
For me the most important aspect to a digital piano is the action. You can always add sounds with either sample libraries or piano modules, but you can't do anything about the action. The digital pianos that have the action that I like the most are the Kawai's. For 25 years I had an acoustic grand piano and I sold it about 18 months ago. I recently got a Kawai ES-110. The main grand piano sound is great, the other sounds are ok, but the action is fantastic... and it cost $550! The built-in speakers are not the best, but then if you're comparing to stage pianos I guess that doesn't matter. It also looks good in a studio environment... more like a midi controller than a piano.
paranoidmoonduck
before getting an acoustic piano, I loved my Kawaii CE-220. Fantastic action, wooden keys (makes a huge difference), and sounded great.
wavecircle
paranoidmoonduck wrote:
before getting an acoustic piano, I loved my Kawaii CE-220. Fantastic action, wooden keys (makes a huge difference), and sounded great.


I had a go on the MP7SE the other day and the action was incredible, the Nord stage felt like a casio sk1 in comparison.

I am going to try to find a MP11SE and see if the extra coin is worth it. Amazing response on the MP7.
mallarme
Korg Grandstage is the best action and sound I hear, and I spent about 6 months going into shops and playing everything I could get my hands on. I finally bought one, and I'm very happy.

The Korg D1 promises the same action, but it has different piano sounds on it. It seems to be a bargain though, price-wise.
Funky40
just my opinion:
the best Grand piano sounds you find within Pianoteq6.
its 100$, plus additional 49$ for more pianos ( bechstein / or Rhodes / etc.)


the E-pianos are to me ~on par with AAS.
i had to go for a studiologic SL 88 Grand keybed, due to a width limitation on my keyboard table.
to my belive is the SL88Grand ( the "grand" suffix makes a difference! its the best fatar keybed) the best keybed behind Kawai, or at least on par with other top top keybeds.
Had a Kronos 73X ( latest model of the kronos1), sold it.
Pianoteq has way better sounding Pianos, and the SL88Grand feels better and has a way better velocity response curve ( and has a much more/fully adjustable velocity curve)

pianoteq runs on old laptops, to me: preferably mac cause of the drive/latency situation and the onboard sound-out jack can do also.
i had pianoteq5 running on an mid 2010 macbook.........not tested with pianoteq6 which consums a slight bit more CPU power.


so, for people who have some of the needed equiment allready at hand would i suggest to allways also check pianoteq....now on version6.
and now are the Grand pianos mind blowing vs. samples etc........my opnion, but not only wink
never had a crash or similar problems !!!

personally i run pianoteq, Grands or EPs most often on a AU-Host ( called HAU) to add AU FX and to go beyond what any stage piano or workstation could deliver in this direction !.......for example to drive it direction ambient or fully experimental.
yes, piano based playing.

HAU is free, super simple to use, can map 16 controller/knobs, and delivers way less latency than a DAW.
i´m still in the acceptable latency range.
trained pianists might winkle their nose, though. wink


just to give another perspective. not missionizing........oh well, maybe i do wink hihi



and also this:
the FX aspect is btw. not to underrate when it comes to the E-Piano sounds.
i´m personally not tooo fond of any of the digital E-pianos.........some clever FX can help here alots to give an E-piano some width and breathing, etc.
ITB FX wins here IMO by miles..........
( i´m btw. not a trained player, ....hobbiist........, but i can hear when it sounds good wink )
Technologear?
Neo wrote:
For me the most important aspect to a digital piano is the action. You can always add sounds with either sample libraries or piano modules, but you can't do anything about the action. The digital pianos that have the action that I like the most are the Kawai's. For 25 years I had an acoustic grand piano and I sold it about 18 months ago. I recently got a Kawai ES-110. The main grand piano sound is great, the other sounds are ok, but the action is fantastic... and it cost $550! The built-in speakers are not the best, but then if you're comparing to stage pianos I guess that doesn't matter. It also looks good in a studio environment... more like a midi controller than a piano.

I'm the same and got the older model es100. I tried everything in local shops, all turned off just playing the keybeds, and these Kawai were my favourite. My model has good old midi in out (essential for my studio). And I find the stock sounds great. When I'm writing, it's helpful for me to not have any sound editing knobs in front of me, otherwise I start chasing sounds rather than notes and arrangements.

You could find them easily in local classifieds I'm guessing, being unused in family homes. Then spend your change on other sound sources if needed. So many good knobby modules exist these days for synth stuff.

PS mallarme said they spent 6months trying keyboards, that's the only way to do it.. that recommendation worth following up on
criticalmonkey
this is where my head is at
Kawai VPC1
played it at name a while back and still think about how good it feels
no sounds - but i use my computer sample stuff anyway

funny - from the way the yamaha cp88 is marketed, i bet that and the kawaii are using the same oem components for the keyboard...
Randy
Another option is something older. I've played piano for 50 years and have an 88 Stage Rhodes, but I owned a Yamaha S90 for a little while and quite liked it. Nice action, and some nice sounds. Even used it to do a CD that I think is still on iTunes and CD Baby.

Randy
Neo
criticalmonkey wrote:
this is where my head is at
Kawai VPC1
played it at name a while back and still think about how good it feels
no sounds - but i use my computer sample stuff anyway

funny - from the way the yamaha cp88 is marketed, i bet that and the kawaii are using the same oem components for the keyboard...

I would be very surprised if that were true. Kawai are supplying keybeds to Nord for the new Nord Grand. Yamaha action is noticeably heavier than Kawai, and heavier than most acoustic grand pianos. Every time I've tried any yamaha digital piano I get sore hands after a few minutes of fast playing. This has never happened on any Kawai digital piano I've tried.
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> General Gear  
Page 1 of 1
Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group