MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index
 FAQ & Terms of UseFAQ & Terms Of Use   Wiggler RadioMW Radio   Muff Wiggler TwitterTwitter   Support the site @ PatreonPatreon 
 SearchSearch   RegisterSign up   Log inLog in 
WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

Suggested Novice DIY Builds from PCB/Panel Sets
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Music Tech DIY  
Author Suggested Novice DIY Builds from PCB/Panel Sets
Forehead84
Wigglers,

I have been DIYing modules from full kits for a year or so and am now looking to take the next step and start building modules from pcb/panel sets and sourcing the components from mouser etc.

The sourcing of the components is a little terrifying for someone without a great deal of electronics knowhow so I wanted to see if you could suggest some modules worth looking at where the BOM is going to be relatively easy to source and/or there is cross over on the components used between kits.

I'm thinking of getting a few pcb/panel sets and then ordering components in one go as I assume this will save on postage.

Also worth adding that I haven't done any SMD soldering yet.

Yours always,

Forehead.
adam
you could try a branches if you fancy trying smd.
euromorcego
Forehead84 wrote:

The sourcing of the components is a little terrifying for someone without a great deal of electronics knowhow so I wanted to see if you could suggest some modules worth looking at where the BOM is going to be relatively easy to source and/or there is cross over on the components used between kits.

everything Barton Musical Circuits (panels are harder to source for BMC), everything Music Thing Modular, Befaco, Feedback Modules, NLC. In fact almost everything but a few more exotic builds.

I suggest to look at BOMs of a few panel/pcb options and see if you can locate everything using e.g. Tayda and/or another retailer like mouser. I'll quickly notice that most modules use a set of stock components that are easy to source (100k, 1k resistors, 100n, 10u capacitors, TL072 and TL074 OpAmps, 1n4148 diodes, 2n3904 transistors etc ...), and then only a few additional components. The former you will have around soon enough if you order a few times.

There are only few really rare components (so always check the BOM before ordering a pcb), more difficult is sometimes to get switches/other hardware with the right footprint.

Check also if there are rare component kits, so pcb/panels with all components that are not easy to source already included.
Otherwise looke at:
- Befaco (and get the pots from them)
- Feedback Modules (incl parts kits).
- NLC (to learn SMD).
- and many many more
Addam
Forehead84 wrote:
I'm thinking of getting a few pcb/panel sets and then ordering components in one go as I assume this will save on postage.

Unless you are truly meticulous prepare to mess up or miss at least 1 or 2 things when placing big mouser orders, especially when this is new.

For some help poke around here for projects that already have mouser carts and save those to your mouser account for reference. One great feature that I urge you use when you get going is to use the option to add a little note to your parts as mouser will print this on the bag - even if you just put what project it’s for, this will save you a lot of time when you sit down to start soldering.
Agawell
frequency central pcb/panel kits are a good starting point if you ask me

most components (pretty much everything except resistors) are linked to tayda in the build doc - so ordering is very easy

with tayda I try to keep orders small(ish), have patience and only use the cheap shipping (the more expensive ones get hit for import duty) and they regularly have sales - just keep a look out here for the tayda days are here again thread - and check the last entry for the latest sale code

for mouser just make sure you get enough to qualify for free shipping - probably about 40GBP or so (probably 1-2 modules)

as much as you can increase numbers of parts to get them cheaper - especially with common resistors and caps - 100 can be the same price as 30

always always buy more parts than you need - especially with smd (they disappear, literally) - but all resistors, caps, diodes and common ics

if you expect to make 10+ modules like this it's probably a good idea to look at making your own idc cables for power - the crimping tool varies widely in price - I got one from Reichelt for 8€ which is pretty cheap - once you've made about 10 then the crimper is paid for out of savings and then power cables start to cost you 50p each - not £2.50+

the other big expense is jacks/pots/knobs and switches - which are often some of the most expensive individual items for the build in my experience most builds use thonkiconn jacks, alpha 9mm pots and mini toggle switches, but not all and they are often incompatible

you might want to shop around a bit (aliexpress/ebay etc) - or pay a bit extra for convenience - ie if you are buying stuff from thonk or mouser then get them there if you can (probably more expensive, but more convenient)

apart from super common components (resistors that start with a 1 for instance) I wouldn't bother keeping a huge amount of parts in stock, just whatever you have left over

if possible buy components for a few modules together to reduce shipping and improve quantity discounts

I've only dealt with customer service at tayda and thonk - both were great

good luck!!!
Agawell
Addam wrote:

Unless you are truly meticulous prepare to mess up or miss at least 1 or 2 things when placing big mouser orders, especially when this is new.

For some help poke around here for projects that already have mouser carts and save those to your mouser account for reference. One great feature that I urge you use when you get going is to use the option to add a little note to your parts as mouser will print this on the bag - even if you just put what project it’s for, this will save you a lot of time when you sit down to start soldering.


how many times have i missed a part from an order, or had parts for a module split between 2 or more suppliers and have to wait for the 3rd delivery for the crucial part!!! which ends up taking a month to arrive

for missing parts from orders for me thonk is worst for this - "I forgot x and it's only available at thonk - better buy another pcb/panel set and any parts for it at the same time to reduce postage - and now I need another tayda order - only waiting on 2 to arrive!!!" - this is where DIY gets expensive

the note thing is a great idea!!! I will start using that from my next order - may have to use some sort of code though as I'll be ordering for about 10 modules - with overlapping parts
OB1
Frequency Central/Barton are probably the easiest to start with.
gruebleengourd
++frequency central.

Barton modules are great too, but IMO the robustness of the PCBs is a bit lesser. I'm a pretty practiced solderer, but have burned out vias on Barton boards which is a PITA. It took me 3 tries to get a working user writable quantizer. Wiring the panel on the Barton modules is typically a lot more difficult as well.
abelovesfun
I run aisynthesis.com.
On my build pages, every part links to where to buy the exact right part, so it's pretty easy to get the right BOM, and you can always just email me if you have a question.
This month the Matrix Mixer and Attenuator come out!
mskala
I've a video on using parametric search for parts sourcing here; it may be of some help: https://video.northcoastsynthesis.com/?t=resistor-shopping-20181028
Forehead84
I've lurked around MW for years and whilst I rarely ask questions it never ceases to amaze me how knowledgeable and helpful people are. Thanks all for the guidance, this gives me great confidence that this is more achievable than I thought and I have plenty of options to look at.
joem
In addition to what others have already suggested (so many good suggestions!), if you want to get into video synthesis, LZX's Cadet and Castle ranges of modules are good options. They're all easy to solder through-hole (though one or two of the Cadets come with a couple SMD pieces pre-soldered), and their BOMs have part numbers for everything. If Mouser happens to be out of stock of one of the pieces, ask on the LZX community forum on their website and you'll get loads of help.

While video synthesis is a whole different beast from audio synthesis, a some of the modules are similar or identical (but with faster op amps), and LZX's DIY ones are really good for beginners.
tassie tiger
Hi Forehead,
I have mostly stuck with
    Frequency Central (well documented and most parts come from Tayda).
    Befaco (reasonably well documented and pots/sliders/switches etc don't have to come from Befaco - they can be found on Modular Addict, although they are sometimes out of stock for a while).
    Barton (well documented although sometimes you have to correlate the PCB markings with the schematic/diagrams - if in doubt email Michael, as he's very helpful). As noted, sometimes there's a bit of hard-wiring to do which takes time.
    Feedback (well documented and great designs).

I tried an 'easy' SMT build recently and spectacularly failed - I might go back to it sometime, as more and more designer-suppliers are going this route. Maybe it's just me, but locating and soldering sub-atomic particles tries my patience!

TT
Agawell
+1 for LZX cadet modules - but whist there are a few that are immediately usable in audio (scaler and fader come to mind) - there are some video ics in these which are overkill for audio and work out more expensive than similar audio/cv specced modules

but if you do want to get into video synthesis, then start building these - make sure you do your reseach as to which modules to build first and realistically how many you will want to build in order to get an interesting and usable system

for example one of each of the cadets will give you a very basic monochrome video synth with video input and output

check out the cadet21 system on modular grid - 21 modules recommended for a basic colour video synth

but they are nice easy builds and relatively easy to source - all the boms can be downloaded from lzx as csv files and imported into mouser - there is one hard to find part for one of the modules iirc - but it wasn't that difficult

if you do go with these modules go and check the diy subforum at lsx for any changes to the boms or substitutions as there are definitely some needed
KittenVillage
There is a facebook group for Eurorack Mouser Carts (search that) which has a google sheet compiling many module BOMs. It's handy, though you should ALWAYS double check them. I'd suggest printing out BOMs and checking each line by hand. Nothing beats having paper you can check off.

I don't have too much experience, but I found that the official Mutable (clone) pcbs are a joy because the parts are numbered from top to bottom. No searching for each number. So far I found Ripples to be the dead-easiest PCB to do. 0603, but I've found that it's not harder than 0805 at all.

That sourcing of parts though, it's a grind. Miss one part and you'll have to set your board aside for a few weeks while you wait for the part. My Miasma build has taken two months so far. But what's eurorack except an exercise in delayed desire?
Noodle Twister
As others say Frequency central is good for the buy pcb/panel get parts from Tayda route.

For SMD Introduction I got three 1U module kits
from Thonk
(kit with some SMD and through hole parts)

So I started with the utilfo a few days ago. It worked after I tidied up my soldering on the IC.
https://foxfield-instruments.com/

Have also got pcb's from Adam in the build queue.
electricanada
These are well-documented with build instructions, Mouser carts, and good support:

http://www.tindie.com/stores/pmfoundations/items/
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Music Tech DIY  
Page 1 of 1
Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group