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Why are Akai S1000’s so bloody expensive suddenly?
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Author Why are Akai S1000’s so bloody expensive suddenly?
3hands
Seriously... 900 bucks on reverb? That’s insanity! Are they seriously worth that? (I guess to the people paying those prices they are)
authorless
They are pretty iconic.
CoreInside
nectarios
3hands wrote:
Seriously... 900 bucks on reverb? That’s insanity! Are they seriously worth that? (I guess to the people paying those prices they are)

The S1100 was my first sampler, good times.

No they are not worth 900 nowdays, unless you are a collector who has cash to burn and is way too bored to find one for 100.
Johnisfaster
3hands wrote:
Seriously... 900 bucks on reverb? That’s insanity! Are they seriously worth that? (I guess to the people paying those prices they are)


My money is on there being a YouTube out there somewhere where someone talked it up.
sutekina bipu-on
Correct me if im wrong, but the expensive S1000's i see usually have cool upgrades like lots of RAM and SCSI2SD's installed.

If anyone's paying that much for a plain S1000 they are probably crazy.

The S1000 has been steadily re-gaining its reputation as "the ultimate 16 bit sampler". They were being sold as low as $100 only last year. The S1100, though, is certainly worth a lot more, it's way better.
tioJim
I've been buying gear old and new for 25 years. If the S1000 is suddenly conisdered to have some kind of mojo then it's the first time I've heard about it.

There's currently an MPC4000 on eBay for £5,000. I hope to God nobody pays that, ever! very frustrating

click here for a good laugh
francoprussian
I don't think they sell at that price. I've seen S1000s up on ebay for £300 or so, and they never get sold. At least that was the case earlier this year. There's an S6000 there now for £240, no USB card though. Think that's cheap.
Sir Ruff
Reverb is no longer a place to regularly find reasonably priced gear—it’s become a place for price speculation. No is paying or has paid $900 for a stock s1000 in like 20 years. Fully updated S900s don’t even go for that much and they are much more in demand. Look for a cheaper one on CL or eBay.
3hands
I payed 150 dollars for mine years ago, and honestly, I think that’s what they’re worth. If someone wants to give me 900 though, I may sell it wink

cool
UltraViolet
There will always be equipment for sale at crazy high prices. Most of the time it doesn't sell, but sometimes it does. If only 10% of the stuff a seller lists at crazy high prices sells then they will make out well and can then dump the rest at normal prices.
CF3
Johnisfaster wrote:
3hands wrote:
Seriously... 900 bucks on reverb? That’s insanity! Are they seriously worth that? (I guess to the people paying those prices they are)


My money is on there being a YouTube out there somewhere where someone talked it up.


^^^This^^^

Somebody like Fact probably did an interview with some producer where they proclaimed its has magic fairy dust and shits rainbow skittles. “Its the sound of the 90’s, bruh”

$900 for a S1000 is crazy, but nothing surprises me anymore. Just saw a Future Retro 777 for $4000! lol
anselmi
because of mamones

todos putos!
Jason Brock
3hands wrote:
Seriously... 900 bucks on reverb? That’s insanity! Are they seriously worth that? (I guess to the people paying those prices they are)


Do you have a link to one that actually sold for that much?
Because Ebay lets you search competed items and there are a few that sold in the $200-$250 range. One sold for $400 that included a sample library.

I could put up a listing for $2,000...that doesn't mean anyone would pay that. I think this is a typical attempt to artificially raise prices on vintage gear. It happens all the time. Some people try to push an inflated price so buyers will see it often enough and maybe start to think that is normal. This could raise the actual selling price of normal auctions. Someone might pay $500 for something if it is surrounded by $900 listings.
Panason
The converters have vintage tone.
miminashi
One big differentiator between samplers is the interpolation scheme used for transpostion. If old posts from KVR and the like are to be believed, the S1000 uses 8-point sinc interpolation, which is far less susceptible to aliasing than the linear interpolation commonly used, since sinc interpolation is inherently band-limited (although not perfectly in this case, due to the relatively low number of taps). So if the S1000 has "mojo", it's that it sounds cleaner when transposing than other samplers, which funnily enough runs counter to what many people seem to think a "vintage" sampler should sound like.

Of course, one has to take into consideration the possibility that people talking about sampler mojo are generally high as shit and don't know what they're talking about (see: SP-1200).
Blairio
I was a Roland Fanboy. I tried akai samplers, but preferred the sound, look and feel of the Roland S550, and then S760 - especially the mouse and monitor interface.

Nonetheless, countless significant recordings used akai kit to great effect.
dkcg
Sir Ruff wrote:
Reverb is no longer a place to regularly find reasonably priced gear—it’s become a place for price speculation. No is paying or has paid $900 for a stock s1000 in like 20 years. Fully updated S900s don’t even go for that much and they are much more in demand. Look for a cheaper one on CL or eBay.


Not true, the sales that are well priced sell within a day.
I listed my Rev2 on Reverb, put a really nice price on it, gone the same day I listed it, while my listing here and CL (same price) only got two tire kickers.

I've also bought some gear that was a new listing and a good price.

The problem is everyone thinks their gear is still worth almost the same as they paid. And thus, listing sit there to never sell, then someone else comes along and thinks the listing is the going rate and lists it for almost the same.

And then someone like me comes along, knows people won't pay the reverb going rate because that's not really the going rate for sold ones, and I sell mine, while other sit and wait to hope someone without an internet connection comes along.
wadesey
I listed some things recently on Reverb at reasonable prices (below the inflated ones for the same item) and got a bunch of offers 50% off the asking price, so it seems like there's also a presumption now that people are going to make these offers and the asking prices are rising to compensate. (In addition to "price speculation", accidental youtube marketing, etc) I ended up selling everything on CL for the asking price instead.

Unless you've been dedicated to the S1000 for over 20 years, have a huge library of custom samples, and yours broke, I can't see why on earth you would want one in 2019. I feel the same way about the mid-90s Mackie resurgence/price increase though too so I'm probably just way out of touch...
Flexyflier
Better go up in the attic and get my S950 and S1000 down........going to be rich
Monotremata
miminashi wrote:
One big differentiator between samplers is the interpolation scheme used for transpostion. If old posts from KVR and the like are to be believed, the S1000 uses 8-point sinc interpolation, which is far less susceptible to aliasing than the linear interpolation commonly used, since sinc interpolation is inherently band-limited (although not perfectly in this case, due to the relatively low number of taps). So if the S1000 has "mojo", it's that it sounds cleaner when transposing than other samplers, which funnily enough runs counter to what many people seem to think a "vintage" sampler should sound like.

Of course, one has to take into consideration the possibility that people talking about sampler mojo are generally high as shit and don't know what they're talking about (see: SP-1200).


I thought it was the 900 or 950 that had the magic interpolation everyone wanted? The 1000 was just like the first of the 16 bit ones I think, there wasn't anything special about it other than its probably one of the more common ones. Every damn 90s sample cd was in S1000/S3000 format.
sutekina bipu-on
Monotremata wrote:
miminashi wrote:
One big differentiator between samplers is the interpolation scheme used for transpostion. If old posts from KVR and the like are to be believed, the S1000 uses 8-point sinc interpolation, which is far less susceptible to aliasing than the linear interpolation commonly used, since sinc interpolation is inherently band-limited (although not perfectly in this case, due to the relatively low number of taps). So if the S1000 has "mojo", it's that it sounds cleaner when transposing than other samplers, which funnily enough runs counter to what many people seem to think a "vintage" sampler should sound like.

Of course, one has to take into consideration the possibility that people talking about sampler mojo are generally high as shit and don't know what they're talking about (see: SP-1200).


I thought it was the 900 or 950 that had the magic interpolation everyone wanted? The 1000 was just like the first of the 16 bit ones I think, there wasn't anything special about it other than its probably one of the more common ones. Every damn 90s sample cd was in S1000/S3000 format.


The s1000 is the last akai to have the "nicer" converters. I can't imagine any reason to use the 1000 over the 3000 series if you gotta have an Akai besides that. Nothing will ever touch that filthy 12 bit sound of the 900/950, but the 1000 could have its inputs or outputs boosted and you'd get a nice thick sound from it only comparable in power to the 900/950. The S1100 has several gain modes although it doesn't boost quite as hard as the 1000 does. The 1100 also has a unique sound character since it uses all different components than the 1000 did and was marketed as a premium version of it. I have had pretty much every akai sampler and i am sticking with a 1100 and im waiting to find a cheap s900 again. The 900/950/1000/1100 all have great filters too, the 900s being the best of them. And the 1100 is honestly worth it as a fx processor if nothing else.
Zenn
There are currently a whole rainbow of Akais on offer on the Dutch Synth Forum for 75 up to 350 euros. Not mine, just illustrating there are normal prices out there

https://www.synthforum.nl/forum/marktplaats/te-koop-ruil-aangeboden/36 97585-studio-opruiming
Jason Brock
Monotremata wrote:

I thought it was the 900 or 950 that had the magic interpolation everyone wanted? The 1000 was just like the first of the 16 bit ones I think...


Yes, those and the 612/700 used variable clock (sample rate) for pitch changes, and that's a big part of their sound. Pitching a sample down sounds great on those machines. The S1000 was Akai's first machine to keep the sample rate static and interpolate pitch changes using digital processing. It was also their first model to use digital filters instead of analog.

I used an S1000 a lot in the 90s and it does sound great, but if there is a case to be made for "vintage" samplers increasing in value it should be the S950 that is more valuable. The S612 is awesome too just because of the sliders and knobs on the panel.
rew_
it's not just the Akais, I don't think. anecdotally a lot of old samplers that used to sell for $150 on CL now go for $400-600. check out the prices on an Ensoniq EPS 16+, for example, or some of the nicer E-Mus (I don't mean the SP-12XX series, those have gone for funny money for years).

it's likely that many of the listed Reverb prices are speculative, but these machines aren't getting newer, so if you want a fully functional unit it's going to cost.
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