MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index
 FAQ & Terms of UseFAQ & Terms Of Use   Wiggler RadioMW Radio   Muff Wiggler TwitterTwitter   Support the site @ PatreonPatreon 
 SearchSearch   RegisterSign up   Log inLog in 
WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

Constant Voltage
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Eurorack Modules  
Author Constant Voltage
mnchrme
Hello. I am wondering. In eurorack realm how is it with cv and its actual values across the wide spectrum of module manufacturers? Is there a standart? I assume that cv signals usually range between -10v ~ +10v? Do some modules produce for example a constant cv value at +10v or +12v?
Arneb
It's a huge can of worms. Some modules use 0/+5, others -5/+5, again others 0/+8, or how about 0/+10, or -2.5/+2.5...
joem
Are you looking for a module that can generate a constant CV voltage? If so, there are several. Pretty much anything that says it can be used for offsets or DC voltage will do the trick. So a module like the Intellijel Triplatt (or the now-retired TriAtt), the Mutable Shades, and so on. Doepfer has one that's specifically for a DC voltage, I think. Also, most sequencers can output constant CV too... just stop it on the step you want and remember that 1V/octave means if you want 5V you want your sequencer to put out a note exactly 5 octaves higher than whatever note it uses for 0V. (Sometimes C0 is 0V, so in that case C5 would be 5V, but not everything uses C0 for 0V.)

As Arneb noted, different modules have different maximum voltages. Most will be between -10V and +10V, due to the nature of the electronics and the design of the circuits. Some of those might not even go that far. Some might be -5V - +8V, or +-5V, or 0 - +5V, or whatever the circuit designer wants. There are some standards, though they're by no means definitive and aren't always followed: http://www.doepfer.de/a100_man/a100t_e.htm
In general, you can often expect gates/triggers to be in the 5-8V range, but this varies. You can often expect envelopes to be around the 5V range at their peak, though this too varies.
BaloErets
This is where attenuverters and offsets come in so handly thumbs up For example, the 4ms SISM does a great job to get your voltages to play well together;
https://4mscompany.com/sism.php
mnchrme
Thank you all for all of this lovely input! I am still fairly new to this topic and I was wondering about this for a while now. I am working on a "simple" design for couple months and constant voltage is something that it probably won't withstand given its application purpose - ie - if I input constant voltage through along those lines as stated before it might break certain things in the circuitry down. It's somewhat in the nature of the wiring solution that presented itself out of many other options, which were not, that good at all. Great to know Triatt can do this, I happen to have one in my rack! So I can test if that will break down the circuit or not. I just want to make sure that it can work well in the whole enviroment without any unexpected twists or surprises. In a nutshell it is responding to incoming cv and then producing results based on that but the thing is in my own assumption cv of alternating values/nature will do just fine but when something constant would come into the signal path then it will mess things up. I need to find a way around it... Thanks again! ^_^ ♪v('∇'*)⌒☆ we're not worthy
kpreid
If your circuit has an input that would respond poorly to a constant voltage (other than 0 V, presumably) then what you need to do is AC couple it — put a capacitor in series with the input, and a resistor across the capacitor to ensure it discharges (if the existing circuit doesn't already do that, which it probably does). These components make up a passive low-pass filter, so you can analyze it as a filter to decide how large a capacitor you want to add as a tradeoff between low-end frequency response (in non-audio terms: how slow a rising/falling signal can be and still be processed as intended) and how much "temporary DC offset" it will be exposed to.

If you have a circuit that you're concerned about the robustness of, you might want to also consider what will happen if someone, say, puts a ±10V square wave, at a low or high frequency, into it. Technically zero DC level! A well-designed module should not be damaged no matter what signal (within the ±12V bounds of the power supply) is sent into it.

If you show what your planned circuit is someone might be able to advise on how to improve it, too.
mnchrme
kpreid wrote:
If your circuit has an input that would respond poorly to a constant voltage (other than 0 V, presumably) then what you need to do is AC couple it — put a capacitor in series with the input, and a resistor across the capacitor to ensure it discharges (if the existing circuit doesn't already do that, which it probably does). These components make up a passive low-pass filter, so you can analyze it as a filter to decide how large a capacitor you want to add as a tradeoff between low-end frequency response (in non-audio terms: how slow a rising/falling signal can be and still be processed as intended) and how much "temporary DC offset" it will be exposed to.

If you have a circuit that you're concerned about the robustness of, you might want to also consider what will happen if someone, say, puts a ±10V square wave, at a low or high frequency, into it. Technically zero DC level! A well-designed module should not be damaged no matter what signal (within the ±12V bounds of the power supply) is sent into it.

If you show what your planned circuit is someone might be able to advise on how to improve it, too.


Hey. I tried square wave + Triatt constant cv value and basically when feeding constant voltage through the circuit nothing went wrong. I’ll keep feeding it that value for couple days and we’ll see. It seems like if some pwm was in there on at all times in the cv signal even when reaching higher values?
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Eurorack Modules  
Page 1 of 1
Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group