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WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

Free learnin' from MIT (Circuits and Electronics)
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Music Tech DIY Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8  Next [all]
Author Free learnin' from MIT (Circuits and Electronics)
Monobass
Go to the enrolment page and there is a log in link on the top right.
Paradigm X
d'oh!

cheers
LoveHertz
revtor wrote:


~Steve, algebra failure... I gravitated to the wood and metal shop.


oh thats good so you'll be just the guy to make us some lovely cabinets and nice modular panels.

clint
Paradigm X
Started the course then, bit worried itll be a bit over my head. Got a bit confused already, mainly about the polarity of currents and voltages - on the initial questions i got the number right but the polarity wrong.

Going to try to keep on top of it but its a big time commitment.

Been wondering why theyre doing it, is is a true altruistic thing? Theyve obv spent a lot of time and money getting all the videos together, the website, the course notes.

The schematic/modelling thing is very impressive too.

I couldnt find out if you dont hand in the homework whether youre 'kicked off', and cant at least watch the lectures etc, or you can watch them all, but not 'pass'.

Still, even at first, the analysis of systems is pretty useful.
Joe.
Paradigm X wrote:

Been wondering why theyre doing it, is is a true altruistic thing? Theyve obv spent a lot of time and money getting all the videos together, the website, the course notes.


You're a Beta tester. Usually Beta testers get nothing but bragging rights (and a few headaches), you on the other hand get access to awesome course material thumbs up
Paradigm X
Makes sense. hihi
Monobass
LoFi Junglist wrote:
Paradigm X wrote:

Been wondering why theyre doing it, is is a true altruistic thing? Theyve obv spent a lot of time and money getting all the videos together, the website, the course notes.


You're a Beta tester. Usually Beta testers get nothing but bragging rights (and a few headaches), you on the other hand get access to awesome course material thumbs up


yeah that's exactly it. They are also keeping up with their competitors, Stanford already have an equivalent program to MITx (which doesn't have any electronics courses).
Monobass
Well I just finished the week 1 homework and lab got 100% on both.

I'm not bragging, just saying because in my experience the lecture series problems are much harder than the actual graded homework!

I plugged away at the lecture series and I've learnt a lot and I can't honestly say yet I fully understand them at all, but just felt it was really important to say you don't need to understand them fully to get a good homework mark.

So don't give in yet if the lectures made you go eek! plenty of time to get into the swing of things I think 8_)
satindas
Monobass wrote:
Well I just finished the week 1 homework and lab got 100% on both.


Me too! And I AM bragging cos I I've not got a clue how I did it ! SlayerBadger! SlayerBadger! SlayerBadger! w00t hyper
akrylik
To all of you taking 6.002x: Huge props to you and I wish you all the best! I think people who are willing to take a risk and learn at any age are seriously the single most important ingredient in any healthy community. we're not worthy
osterchrisi
bkbirge wrote:
When did it become vogue to say "maths" instead of "math" or is that just one of the many differences between English English and American English?


Well, you're still on a modular synth forum wink

I enrolled too by the way. At least I could make it through the first week without troubles but let's see what is still comming up there...
Monobass
oh I didn't realise the "in vogue" comment might have been about the Make Noise module hihi

I would probably have been 5% less likely to buy a Maths had Tony incorrectly named it Math. Or maybe less likely to be in a position where I'm considering buying a third...
Ianh
just going to sail until i sink as far as this course is concerned.
numbertalk
akrylik wrote:
To all of you taking 6.002x: Huge props to you and I wish you all the best! I think people who are willing to take a risk and learn at any age are seriously the single most important ingredient in any healthy community. we're not worthy


That's what I'm saying! Got my lab and homework done today. Hanging in there so far.
Spandex
here's a question someone might be able to help me with (can't bear to use the fisherprice "Discussion" thing on the MITX site). thanks in advance for your brain time.

K.. so voltages are potential differences so you have to measure one relative to another. you need to choose a ground. doing the first week on this course made me realise that i'm confused about this. i always thought that the AC supply to my house actually changed direction with a real, absolute centre point of "0". Is that just rubbish?

I guess I'm asking if the whole idea of "ground" is always just a mathematical one... or is there a real thing that often gets used as a reference point from which to measure "absolute" potential differences?

That kind of leads on to another question.. which is... if I had a 24volt DC supply.. can I make a +12v, 0v and -12v simply by building a voltage divider with two equal resistors and putting the ground in the centre. Obviously, I'll get those readings... but is that then ok to power/test a module? The current will be within the expected limits so I guess it is? But if I then patched it into my modular, is the ground in the modular PSU different?
wmonk
Spandex wrote:

I guess I'm asking if the whole idea of "ground" is always just a mathematical one... or is there a real thing that often gets used as a reference point from which to measure "absolute" potential differences?

In a lot of devices, especially home appliance ones, the circuit ground is connected to "earth" thru your mains plug. So earth is used a lot as reference point. But I won't call it an absolute potential difference, mainly because 'difference' suggests something relative.

Spandex wrote:

That kind of leads on to another question.. which is... if I had a 24volt DC supply.. can I make a +12v, 0v and -12v simply by building a voltage divider with two equal resistors and putting the ground in the centre. Obviously, I'll get those readings... but is that then ok to power/test a module? The current will be within the expected limits so I guess it is? But if I then patched it into my modular, is the ground in the modular PSU different?

Well, you can make a dual supply that way, and I do that a lot. You would have to connect the two grounds together to make it work correctly of course. Circuits need the common ground when interacting.
But as I said, a lot of times 'ground' is connected to earth. You don't want your negative rail of the 24V PSU be connected to earth when you do this, otherwise you might have a short. (or disconnect the modular from earth, that would work too)
Spandex
Right. Thanks. I think I'm starting to get a clue here.

tbh, it's all very clear from this 6002 course (which is really good).. and it's not like i didn't have a decent grounding in a-level physics and all the basic equations anyway... but i'm having to unlearn some sloppy thinking that's been in my head for 20 years. takes some shifting.
Monobass
it is really good. and I've just got a good score on the 2nd week homework and lab.. but I'm really not able to find the time to go beyond that. Have a feeling the mid-term is going to be a bit of a car crash as I feel I'm really not exploring the content broadly enough.

But I'm learning loads. while I can't deny I'd like a certificate I'm not sure how likely that is right now! and it's not really why i'm doing it.. if only I didn't have this damn pride...
Spandex
yeah, i don't want to give up smile

but i'm also becoming a little frustrated, in that i'm finding a lot of it is just maths exercises... solving endless simultaneous equations feels like i'm just cranking a handle.

i wish there was more "give a formula for x" and less "work out the actual value of x for these value of a,b,c,d,e and f". Don't get me wrong, i'd be all over it if I was building a circuit that did something I was interested in.. but for endless example circuits with random networks of resistors and voltage/current sources, it's getting a bit tedious.
Monobass
I don't mind the cranking so much, I need the practice tbh. I just don't have the time.
gwaidan
Positive here so far-finding that it's giving me what I wanted from a uni-level course by forcing me to learn a theoretical framework that will take me wherever I want to go rather than fudging it until I hit a brick wall as I have been doing up to now-can see the wisdom of Hinton's cruel-but-fair comments on the difference between an engineer and a technician now. The Boolean logic stuff in week 2 was a nice breather from the circuit analysis equations. Looks like we design real circuits with MOSFETS next...

PS if ya want the textbook cheap check out ABE (http://www.abebooks.com/). I bought the Indian version of the text (identical to American) for $30 including postage and looks fine-just arrived this week. nanners
polyroy
I bailed on it. After looking through the first week of lecture notes etc, it struck me that I'm in way over my head and I don't have the commitment for it.
loydb
Spandex wrote:
but i'm also becoming a little frustrated, in that i'm finding a lot of it is just maths exercises... solving endless simultaneous equations feels like i'm just cranking a handle.


Well, a bunch of people did *say* this was going to be pretty much a math course... But I understand your frustration, this is why I didn't enroll.
numbertalk
What I am hearing from most of the people here who were interested in this course was that as SDIY enthusiasts they were interested in learning more. From this perspective, even if someone decided to drop from doing the homework and were stil able to get something from the lectures, good for you. Anyone, especially with a snotty attitude, who would discourage anyone interested in learning and bettering themselves, especially from a free online course, is a prick in my book. So to hell with calling Hinton's comments "fair".
Monobass
loydb wrote:
Spandex wrote:
but i'm also becoming a little frustrated, in that i'm finding a lot of it is just maths exercises... solving endless simultaneous equations feels like i'm just cranking a handle.


Well, a bunch of people did *say* this was going to be pretty much a math course... But I understand your frustration, this is why I didn't enroll.


I think you're missing the point here, I don't think Spandex's frustration is with the Maths, just the amount of 'handle cranking' like he says.

There is plenty to get from the lectures for an SDIY enthusiast. While the first couple of weeks are teaching you the tools that'll be used throughout the course (the source of the handle cranking), it pretty soon jumps after that to very practical stuff like using MOSFETs to build logic gates and then Op-Amps.

So if it all started too abstract for people, maybe the practical stuff that follows will help.
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