MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index
 FAQ & Terms of UseFAQ & Terms Of Use   Wiggler RadioMW Radio   Muff Wiggler TwitterTwitter   Support the site @ PatreonPatreon 
 SearchSearch   RegisterSign up   Log inLog in 
WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

Free learnin' from MIT (Circuits and Electronics)
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Music Tech DIY Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8  Next [all]
Author Free learnin' from MIT (Circuits and Electronics)
LektroiD
I'm already doing an open university degree in engineering, and they already mentioned that I can use points from previous courses to go towards my degree... Maybe the points from this course would count too.

Regardless, I signed up thumbs up
Graham Hinton
revtor wrote:
Mathematics makes engineering concepts abstract.


Mathematics is the abstraction, a modelling of ideas. It is a vital tool which enables engineering concepts to be modelled and predicted. If you learn how to do that first it can be applied to many different things. If you only learn one application you won't recognise it in different forms. You end up doing more work by avoiding to do the thing that ties it all together and makes it easier.

Quote:

Real world explanations by someone who really knows whats going on is what makes Engineering understandable.


That's training, it's not the same thing as education which arms you to cope with something new.

Quote:

How about this. I know how a state variable filter works, and I understand how capacitors and inductors behave in a circuit. Yeah. Really. Can you use that to teach me the math? Then I'm all ears.


I've taught many people maths and electronics, except where they refused to learn and that wasn't my loss.
I suspect that you only know what a state variable filter does, rather than how it does it. Otherwise please say how it works without using the maths.
Do you know what is has in common with a pendulum or a vibrating beam? Do you know how it is used in analogue computers?
If you had learnt the maths I could show you how it is applied, but you have to do the groundwork first. That's why differential equations are a prerequisite for the course.

I've seen Anant Agarwal's lectures and he uses mathematical jargon as shorthand and expects you to follow. It is often hard to catch what he says anyway and read his scribble on the blackboard. I already know what he's talking about and can fill in the gaps, but I can't imagine what that would be like for somebody coming at it for the first time.
Anyone who thinks they can do a course like this and can pick up the maths on the way is kidding themselves. They will find it like being in a strange country without being able to speak the language. I've seen people in engineering classes like that with it all going over their heads and I've seen people in the real world trying to do engineering without the maths ability. They get so far and then get totally stuck.

I'm not saying don't do the course, I'm saying prepare yourself as they ask you to and don't kid yourself that it isn't necessary. If you think you can blag it just wait till they throw Divs, Grads and Curls at you...
decaying.sine
Come on Graham. You are sounding very negative and elitist here. We are just a bunch of folks really interested in learning through this open course forum. If our prerequisite knowledge isn't up to speed then we'll work together through this forum and the class forum, banding together, to try understand the math behind the engineering. It's an open forum course, and we're enrolling because we are passionate, and I am sure that any wiggler that ultimately feels that it is too much will not continue in the course. Nobody expects anything to be handed to them. We, like others, enjoy meeting challenges head on, working as team, sharing experiences, and if it is too much, then that individual will certainly decide his/her own breaking point and then move on.
numbertalk
Yeah, really pretentious response guy. One thing to raise awareness of this issue, another to be a pud about it.
Monobass
I agree about the tone of Graham's response.

But having looking at the first three video lectures of the 6002 course I have to say he is basically right. The maths is not optional, it's not something which provides an extra insight into the material discussed, it is the material.

That's not to say you won't get *anything* from it... but like I said above, by the time I was 2/3rds of the way through the second lecture I realised that even my algebra needed a serious refresh.

I did a degree 15 years ago that featured heavy mechanical engineering and a little electrical engineering... and boy.. a lot of that stuff is barely present anymore. That 10 hours a week recommendation seems like the minimum I'll be needing to do.

bring it on.
numbertalk
Yeah, my dispute isn't with what he has to say. I can totally see what he's saying and it could be a wake up call for some people planning to take this class. His tone just sucks ass.
Spanningtree
I know how it goes bringing your math skills back up to par. About 10 years ago I decided to take some additional engineering classes at the local college. They had to re-assess my math skills since it had been so long I was in school. I used the book below to do a deep dive boot camp over a few weeks to bone up as well as some of the schaum books. The schaum books I would recommend for large sets of solved problems and you can get one that is pretty specific for whatever your weak in (trig for me).

http://www.amazon.com/Mastering-Technical-Mathematics-Stan-Gibilisco/d p/0070248281/ref=sr_1_5?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1329510695&sr=1-5
decaying.sine
numbertalk wrote:
Yeah, my dispute isn't with what he has to say. I can totally see what he's saying and it could be a wake up call for some people planning to take this class. His tone just sucks ass.


cookie?!?
Luka
There are course notes for differential calc on the site
Wise to go through them b4 you begin to judge your math skills and where you need to improve.

http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/mathematics/18-03sc-differential-equations- fall-2011/
wavecircle
Graham is right, lots of people try to get into Physics whilst being completely disinterested in the Mathematics of it all, the only path they are on is the one leading to disappointment and failure. You NEED to know or at least take a serious interest in maths to get any good at these kinds of things. While Graham might be perceived as being negative, he is being a complete realist.

I put this post up a few days ago and not a single person has responded to it:

wavecircle wrote:
Ive just had an operation so i am going to be housebound for about a month. If people are interested i could do some skype teaching. We could do basic algebra and calculus with a little bit of physics thrown in for good measure. I am currently a physics undergrad at a pretty good uk university so maybe i can help a few people.


I am happy to help people with their maths, regardless of how basic but not a single soul has taken any interest. Strange...
numbertalk
What is going on? These are musicians and synth enthusiasts. Bound for failure? Uh oh people, hear this, you are doomed to live in your parents basement for the rest of your lives and never make anything of yourself. People just need to relax the tone here. It's a frickin free course on circuits! It's also people's decisions to do what the hell they please. Didn't know my dad was on this forum so much.
Monobass
wavecircle that would be great, I somehow missed your post above, I think once the course starts I would definitely like your help.

I'm planning to also corral a maths teacher I know into giving me some tutoring beforehand hihi
wavecircle
numbertalk wrote:
What is going on? These are musicians and synth enthusiasts. Bound for failure? Uh oh people, hear this, you are doomed to live in your parents basement for the rest of your lives and never make anything of yourself. People just need to relax the tone here. It's a frickin free course on circuits! It's also people's decisions to do what the hell they please. Didn't know my dad was on this forum so much.


People who take no interest in maths won't fail in life but they will certainly fail in physics. I am not talking about the wider context here.

Monobass, no problem. If you did maths 15 years ago you won't have any problem remembering it. We can do some algebra and some calculus. I think the 6.002 course said these are the prerequisites. Differential equations come later.
numbertalk
Who the heck is talking about physics (ok obviously physics is involved, but this is primarily a synth forum)? It's one thing to say "if anyone is serious about this course, you will definitely need to brush up on your math" and another to take this holier than thou obnoxious attitude (not so much you, more Hinton). What is wrong with curiosity and checking this course out no matter what? We're not talking about enrolling for a full degree and planning my damn life around this free class.
numbertalk
And for the record, I'm not a troll here. You can view my history of posts to see that. These replies just rubbed me the wrong way on the wrong day. I'm done hijacking this thread. But I will exit with a plea to drop the snooty and holier than thou attitudes. It's only the business of the person deciding to give this class a shot how seriously they want to take it etc... It shouldn't bother you if no one wants your help with math etc...
Monobass
Spanningtree wrote:
I know how it goes bringing your math skills back up to par. About 10 years ago I decided to take some additional engineering classes at the local college. They had to re-assess my math skills since it had been so long I was in school. I used the book below to do a deep dive boot camp over a few weeks to bone up as well as some of the schaum books. The schaum books I would recommend for large sets of solved problems and you can get one that is pretty specific for whatever your weak in (trig for me).

http://www.amazon.com/Mastering-Technical-Mathematics-Stan-Gibilisco/d p/0070248281/ref=sr_1_5?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1329510695&sr=1-5


this looks really good, I just picked up a copy for £12 second hand thumbs up
wavecircle
Curiosity is excellent, I think this course is an absolutely amazing opportunity for anyone interested in synths and general electronics. This is one of the best scientific institutions in the world offering free education. People shouldn't be put off by the maths though, if anything they should use this course as an excuse to get into maths, it can be very rewarding. Like I have said, I am happy to help people with their maths, I won't shout at anyone for not understanding right away. thumbs up
numbertalk
wavecircle wrote:
Curiosity is excellent, I think this course is an absolutely amazing opportunity for anyone interested in synths and general electronics. This is one of the best scientific institutions in the world offering free education. People shouldn't be put off by the maths though, if anything they should use this course as an excuse to get into maths, it can be very rewarding. Like I have said, I am happy to help people with their maths, I won't shout at anyone for not understanding right away. thumbs up


Sounds awesome. Thank you for the generous offer. I did 3 years of calculus when I earned my CS degree, and did quite well and actually enjoyed it, but it's been 12 years. I'm going to check out the book someone suggested on Amazon earlier here and feel things out. Would be great if I could manage to get something out of this course. I would take you up on the offer, but between work and being a parent & husband as well as trying to make music in my free time (what's that?), just would make it easier for me to get a book and read it in bed at night.
lizlarsen
I signed up as well! All of my electronics knowledge is contextual, after hundreds of hours of synth DIY and module development -- my partner in LZX handles all the more complex engineering. So while I think some of this will be review, I'm looking forward to fleshing out a broader understanding of all the basics in a holistic instead of SynthDIY-focused way.
Monobass
wavecircle wrote:
People shouldn't be put off by the maths though, if anything they should use this course as an excuse to get into maths, it can be very rewarding.


yeah. i used to love maths. then for some reason I did the wrong degree about things I had no interest in and grew to hate it. It was a free education and I even got a grant.... it would probably cost me about £40k to make that ill advised mistake if I was 18 now d'oh!
wavecircle
Same here, except I have done something about it just before the course fees triple. I did sound design at university first time round but have always found it very hard to make a reasonable living from it. Physics was always my favourite subject at school so I enrolled last year. I'll be 32 when I graduate but hopefully I can go on further than BSc.
Monobass
heh, I make reasonable living with sound design but now wish I had just done electronics.
bkbirge
I'll help with the remedial math, here's the first self evaluation quiz...

bkbirge
2nd quiz, not asking you to do this, just look at it, if it is completely a mystery then run don't walk to do some remedials...

ben jah men
^^^ fuck.

so the fact that I'm struggling in "college algebra" means I don't have a chance seriously, i just don't get it


despair.
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Music Tech DIY Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8  Next [all]
Page 3 of 8
Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group