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Free learnin' from MIT (Circuits and Electronics)
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Music Tech DIY  
Author Free learnin' from MIT (Circuits and Electronics)
Monobass
Well I've enrolled, anyone else?

Quote:
MITx will offer a portfolio of MIT courses for free to a virtual community of learners around the world. It will also enhance the educational experience of its on-campus students, offering them online tools that supplement and enrich their classroom and laboratory experiences.

The first MITx course, 6.002x (Circuits and Electronics), will be launched in an experimental prototype form. Watch this space for further upcoming courses, which will become available in Fall 2012.


http://mitx.mit.edu/#
neilbaldwin
Monobass wrote:
Well I've enrolled, anyone else?

Quote:
MITx will offer a portfolio of MIT courses for free to a virtual community of learners around the world. It will also enhance the educational experience of its on-campus students, offering them online tools that supplement and enrich their classroom and laboratory experiences.

The first MITx course, 6.002x (Circuits and Electronics), will be launched in an experimental prototype form. Watch this space for further upcoming courses, which will become available in Fall 2012.


http://mitx.mit.edu/#


Whoa, nice! Just what I'm looking for at the moment.

thumbs up
Monobass
yeah I'd been looking at things like Open University... they don't even do electronics courses anymore.

I'll be fucked If I can remember the Calculus I did on my degree 18 years ago though... I spent all my time making techno, playing mario kart and smoking weed wink

Fortunately I've mainly cut out the Mario Kart and weed these days so I might get somewhere wink
diophantine
Thanks for posting!

Does it give you any sort of syllabus or schedule when you enroll? I'm curious how much time I'd need to devote to this every week.
SOFTWIRE
just signed up. hopefully the math isnt too over my head!
Monobass
just the info here

https://6002x.mitx.mit.edu/#

it runs March - June, recommends 10 hours a week and this book - http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1558607358/ref=nosim
neilbaldwin
Monobass wrote:
yeah I'd been looking at things like Open University... they don't even do electronics courses anymore.

I'll be fucked If I can remember the Calculus I did on my degree 18 years ago though... I spent all my time making techno, playing mario kart and smoking weed wink

Fortunately I've mainly cut out the Mario Kart and weed these days so I might get somewhere wink
]

I looked at OU too and you're right - no electronics.

I did read on Tim Stinchcombe's website that he did an OU course with Teeside University but it seemed like quite a commitment. hihi

http://www.timstinchcombe.co.uk/index.php?pge=about
SOFTWIRE
it says about 10hrs a week. probly more if you suck at math like me! march 5th through june 8th
ThinLazy
Thanks for info, I just enrolled too.
wavecircle
Khan Academy has all the maths you will ever need.
bkbirge
I just enrolled more out of curiousity as I've got an EE anyway. But I could use a refresher, especially on PDE's. All I do lately is program.
bkbirge
wavecircle wrote:
Khan Academy has all the maths you will ever need.


When did it become vogue to say "maths" instead of "math" or is that just one of the many differences between English English and American English? I'm really not judging, just curious. I realize I'm old, no need to point that out to me, lol. Guinness ftw!
Spanningtree
Thanks, just enrolled too. My background is EE too but I've worked in IT for the last 20 years. Need to get my math s**t together too. Should be fun!

w00t
Joe.
SOFTWIRE wrote:
it says about 10hrs a week. probly more if you suck at math like me!


If you really suck at math you could use a program called "Algebra solved".
Pretty sure you could use it with most problems you encounter (there's also trigonometry solved etc).
It's pretty good as a learning tool (I got it for my sister) because it breaks down a problem step by step with explanations if you want. it would have been quite useful while i was in trade school as i was a little bit rusty (hadn't done math in years)

If you search for "Bagatrix" you'll find a file to download in no time thumbs up
mome rath
oh good

we can work on our maths homeworks together
diophantine
Cool, thanks guys! I missed the 10h/wk thing.

Kinda a big commitment for me (considering that I'll be gone a couple weeks during that time), but no matter, it should still be good for me. I've been seriously teaching myself electronics the past couple years, so this will be good. (I learned to read schematics as a kid, but my year of EE in university was horrible: who cares what a voltage divider does, you've just gotta know how the electrons are flowing, and how many of them there are! confused )

bkbirge wrote:
wavecircle wrote:
Khan Academy has all the maths you will ever need.


When did it become vogue to say "maths" instead of "math" or is that just one of the many differences between English English and American English? I'm really not judging, just curious. I realize I'm old, no need to point that out to me, lol. Guinness ftw!

US/UK/European thing, yup! Same with info/infos.

I'll sometimes say maths/infos, but only because I've worked with & communicate with a lot of folks from Europe.
decaying.sine
I just signed up too. Forum handle will be decayingsine for the course. This probably will not go well, but maybe I can throw spitballs from the back of the classroom.
wavecircle
Enrolled!

bkbirge wrote:
wavecircle wrote:
Khan Academy has all the maths you will ever need.


When did it become vogue to say "maths" instead of "math" or is that just one of the many differences between English English and American English? I'm really not judging, just curious. I realize I'm old, no need to point that out to me, lol. Guinness ftw!


I am British, therefore I use the correct parlance. smile

"Math" d'oh! gets on my nerves.
msprigings
I'm going to give it a whirl but I was an art major in college. Stuff like differential equations makes me want to vomit. very frustrating
Monobass
wavecircle wrote:
bkbirge wrote:
wavecircle wrote:
Khan Academy has all the maths you will ever need.


When did it become vogue to say "maths" instead of "math" or is that just one of the many differences between English English and American English? I'm really not judging, just curious. I realize I'm old, no need to point that out to me, lol. Guinness ftw!


I am British, therefore I use the correct parlance. smile

"Math" d'oh! gets on my nerves.


Yeah Math gets on my nerves far more than it should smile

'Legos' too. The plural of Lego is clearly Lego 8_)

Also, no one (in the UK at least) ever says 'infos'.

Also it's Aluminium.

Glad we got that all sorted. Mr. Green
ben jah men
thanks for the reminder. enrolled.
samuraipizzacat29
Thanks for the share.

I'm inordinately long old silly cartoon tv show screenname on there as well.

It's kind of funny that I have these calc credits from my high school AP course and I remember exactly zilch of it. So technically I'm qualified for it, but in actuality no dice. I'm not a fan of spitballs but maybe my paper airplanes can air freight them around the room for you.
decaying.sine
samuraipizzacat29 wrote:
I'm not a fan of spitballs but maybe my paper airplanes can air freight them around the room for you.


Deal!
Clockgate
Just signed up hyper

I have a degree in electronics and work in the sector, but haven't used a lot of the basic stuff in years. It will be great revision, but mainly I want a certificate from MIT!
Luka
i just enrolled too - if nothing else i can dust off my math skills smile
revtor
hmmm that looks awesome, but really I am reminded of the many many EE level electronics books I've picked up over the years and immediately put down because, hey, I don't want to do math, I want to make stuff.

If It didn't take me three years to pass calc I'd sign up in an instant though.


~Steve, algebra failure... I gravitated to the wood and metal shop.
Graham Hinton
msprigings wrote:
I'm going to give it a whirl but I was an art major in college. Stuff like differential equations makes me want to vomit. very frustrating


Then you are wasting your time.

Mathematics is not optional if you want to study engineering, it is a prerequisite. Mathematics makes engineering concepts understandable and without a command of mathematics you will never become an engineeer, merely a technician. Beware of courses and books that claim that you don't need mathematics.


If you cannot understand what differential equations are about you will never really grasp how capacitors and inductors behave and you will never understand how a state variable filter works because it is a differential equation. Or any other filter for that matter, isn't that enough to motivate you to want to learn mathematics?


I had a look at some of the MIT electronics lectures online recently searching for something to recommend somebody wanting to learn electronics. I would hesitate to recommend them and found the style of presentation poor, they seemed to skirt around the subject and introduce irrelevencies instead of zeroing in to the heart of the matter. Maybe it seemed slow and laboured because they were trying to keep the mathematically challenged on board?
tobias
I too was an art major, but I signed up anyhow. This is what interests me so hopefully I'll be able to comprehend it and fuck the maths up.
revtor
Mathematics makes engineering concepts abstract. Real world explanations by someone who really knows whats going on is what makes Engineering understandable.

How about this. I know how a state variable filter works, and I understand how capacitors and inductors behave in a circuit. Yeah. Really. Can you use that to teach me the math? Then I'm all ears.


stirring the pot here... on purpose.

~Steve
wavecircle
A little bit of differentiation and integration never hurt anyone. Grow some balls.
withakay
Monobass wrote:
yeah I'd been looking at things like Open University... they don't even do electronics courses anymore.

I'll be fucked If I can remember the Calculus I did on my degree 18 years ago though... I spent all my time making techno, playing mario kart and smoking weed wink

Fortunately I've mainly cut out the Mario Kart and weed these days so I might get somewhere wink


Heh, I know this one too smile
Luka
wavecircle wrote:
A little bit of differentiation and integration never hurt anyone. Grow some balls.


Then we can analyse the rate of change in growing time.
Joe.
Graham Hinton wrote:
Mathematics makes engineering concepts understandable and without a command of mathematics you will never become an engineeer, merely a technician.


Merely a Technician ?!

Rabble rabble rabble!

You sound like most engineers I know razz
bkbirge
LoFi Junglist wrote:
Graham Hinton wrote:
Mathematics makes engineering concepts understandable and without a command of mathematics you will never become an engineeer, merely a technician.


Merely a Technician ?!

Rabble rabble rabble!

You sound like most engineers I know razz


Sheldon Cooper: Engineering - this is where the semi-skilled workers realize the work of better minds. Hello, Oompah-Loompahs of science.
Monobass
I can't be the only one who wondered if Graham Hinton has an orange face and green hair.
negativspace
I thought everyone in England looked like that. seriously, i just don't get it
cleaninglady
signed up !

calculus... Dead Banana
Paradigm X
Monobass wrote:
I spent all my time making techno, playing mario kart and smoking weed wink


lol

hihi
Monobass
There is a list of per-requisites for the course here

http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/6-002x-related-curriculum/

all of which are designed for independent study.
msprigings
Graham Hinton wrote:
msprigings wrote:
I'm going to give it a whirl but I was an art major in college. Stuff like differential equations makes me want to vomit. very frustrating


Then you are wasting your time.




Assuming it's applied to what I'm in interested I'll attempt to learn. I don't see any harm in trying.
wavecircle
Ive just had an operation so i am going to be housebound for about a month. If people are interested i could do some skype teaching. We could do basic algebra and calculus with a little bit of physics thrown in for good measure. I am currently a physics undergrad at a pretty good uk university so maybe i can help a few people.
robotmakers
If you're not comfortable with calculus, you might find the prerequisite 18.03 challenging, depending on the instructor. 8.02 is easier. In any case, you guys are going to have to figure out a way to create a web-based "hack" to celebrate completion of the course. Maybe by replacing the opencourseware webpage with a sequencer or something?

Best wishes,
Roger (class of '82)
Cable
msprigings wrote:
Graham Hinton wrote:
msprigings wrote:
I'm going to give it a whirl but I was an art major in college. Stuff like differential equations makes me want to vomit. very frustrating


Then you are wasting your time.



Assuming it's applied to what I'm in interested I'll attempt to learn. I don't see any harm in trying.


Same thoughts here.^^
polyroy
It looks interesting, but with my poor maths skills, I don't know if I'd want to commit and end up wasting my time and the lecturers time.
Monobass
I've watched the first couple of 6002 lectures online

never mind the Calculus. My rusty algebra needs a kickstart too!

It would be great to have an ongoing support thread on Muffs while the course runs. As long as things stay within the honor code laid out on the MITx site.

* Complete all mid-terms and final exams with only my own work.
* Maintain only one account, and not share the username or password.
* Not engage in any activities that would dishonestly improve my results, or improve or hurt those of others.
* Not post answers to problems that are being used to assess student performance.
decaying.sine
From the sign up, it also sounded like there would be a class forum as well.

I agree with you, monobass, on the support thread so long as it is within the honor code. I've never enrolled in online education so I am excited to give it a try.
fate
i'd love to do this but i'm awful at math, though I am an electrician in my day job heh
Monobass
decaying.sine wrote:
From the sign up, it also sounded like there would be a class forum as well.

I agree with you, monobass, on the support thread so long as it is within the honor code. I've never enrolled in online education so I am excited to give it a try.


Yeah I'm sure the class forum will be pretty lively and helpful.. It would be nice to make synth specific associations here too.
robotmakers
Group work on ungraded material is definitely encouraged.
loydb
I'm grabbing the textbook to check out. I'm in the last semester of finishing up a BA that I started in the early 1980s, so I probably don't have time to take it this time around -- but I can at least assess where my rusty, rusty math skillz are and do some background prep for the next time around.
LektroiD
I'm already doing an open university degree in engineering, and they already mentioned that I can use points from previous courses to go towards my degree... Maybe the points from this course would count too.

Regardless, I signed up thumbs up
Graham Hinton
revtor wrote:
Mathematics makes engineering concepts abstract.


Mathematics is the abstraction, a modelling of ideas. It is a vital tool which enables engineering concepts to be modelled and predicted. If you learn how to do that first it can be applied to many different things. If you only learn one application you won't recognise it in different forms. You end up doing more work by avoiding to do the thing that ties it all together and makes it easier.

Quote:

Real world explanations by someone who really knows whats going on is what makes Engineering understandable.


That's training, it's not the same thing as education which arms you to cope with something new.

Quote:

How about this. I know how a state variable filter works, and I understand how capacitors and inductors behave in a circuit. Yeah. Really. Can you use that to teach me the math? Then I'm all ears.


I've taught many people maths and electronics, except where they refused to learn and that wasn't my loss.
I suspect that you only know what a state variable filter does, rather than how it does it. Otherwise please say how it works without using the maths.
Do you know what is has in common with a pendulum or a vibrating beam? Do you know how it is used in analogue computers?
If you had learnt the maths I could show you how it is applied, but you have to do the groundwork first. That's why differential equations are a prerequisite for the course.

I've seen Anant Agarwal's lectures and he uses mathematical jargon as shorthand and expects you to follow. It is often hard to catch what he says anyway and read his scribble on the blackboard. I already know what he's talking about and can fill in the gaps, but I can't imagine what that would be like for somebody coming at it for the first time.
Anyone who thinks they can do a course like this and can pick up the maths on the way is kidding themselves. They will find it like being in a strange country without being able to speak the language. I've seen people in engineering classes like that with it all going over their heads and I've seen people in the real world trying to do engineering without the maths ability. They get so far and then get totally stuck.

I'm not saying don't do the course, I'm saying prepare yourself as they ask you to and don't kid yourself that it isn't necessary. If you think you can blag it just wait till they throw Divs, Grads and Curls at you...
decaying.sine
Come on Graham. You are sounding very negative and elitist here. We are just a bunch of folks really interested in learning through this open course forum. If our prerequisite knowledge isn't up to speed then we'll work together through this forum and the class forum, banding together, to try understand the math behind the engineering. It's an open forum course, and we're enrolling because we are passionate, and I am sure that any wiggler that ultimately feels that it is too much will not continue in the course. Nobody expects anything to be handed to them. We, like others, enjoy meeting challenges head on, working as team, sharing experiences, and if it is too much, then that individual will certainly decide his/her own breaking point and then move on.
numbertalk
Yeah, really pretentious response guy. One thing to raise awareness of this issue, another to be a pud about it.
Monobass
I agree about the tone of Graham's response.

But having looking at the first three video lectures of the 6002 course I have to say he is basically right. The maths is not optional, it's not something which provides an extra insight into the material discussed, it is the material.

That's not to say you won't get *anything* from it... but like I said above, by the time I was 2/3rds of the way through the second lecture I realised that even my algebra needed a serious refresh.

I did a degree 15 years ago that featured heavy mechanical engineering and a little electrical engineering... and boy.. a lot of that stuff is barely present anymore. That 10 hours a week recommendation seems like the minimum I'll be needing to do.

bring it on.
numbertalk
Yeah, my dispute isn't with what he has to say. I can totally see what he's saying and it could be a wake up call for some people planning to take this class. His tone just sucks ass.
Spanningtree
I know how it goes bringing your math skills back up to par. About 10 years ago I decided to take some additional engineering classes at the local college. They had to re-assess my math skills since it had been so long I was in school. I used the book below to do a deep dive boot camp over a few weeks to bone up as well as some of the schaum books. The schaum books I would recommend for large sets of solved problems and you can get one that is pretty specific for whatever your weak in (trig for me).

http://www.amazon.com/Mastering-Technical-Mathematics-Stan-Gibilisco/d p/0070248281/ref=sr_1_5?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1329510695&sr=1-5
decaying.sine
numbertalk wrote:
Yeah, my dispute isn't with what he has to say. I can totally see what he's saying and it could be a wake up call for some people planning to take this class. His tone just sucks ass.


cookie?!?
Luka
There are course notes for differential calc on the site
Wise to go through them b4 you begin to judge your math skills and where you need to improve.

http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/mathematics/18-03sc-differential-equations- fall-2011/
wavecircle
Graham is right, lots of people try to get into Physics whilst being completely disinterested in the Mathematics of it all, the only path they are on is the one leading to disappointment and failure. You NEED to know or at least take a serious interest in maths to get any good at these kinds of things. While Graham might be perceived as being negative, he is being a complete realist.

I put this post up a few days ago and not a single person has responded to it:

wavecircle wrote:
Ive just had an operation so i am going to be housebound for about a month. If people are interested i could do some skype teaching. We could do basic algebra and calculus with a little bit of physics thrown in for good measure. I am currently a physics undergrad at a pretty good uk university so maybe i can help a few people.


I am happy to help people with their maths, regardless of how basic but not a single soul has taken any interest. Strange...
numbertalk
What is going on? These are musicians and synth enthusiasts. Bound for failure? Uh oh people, hear this, you are doomed to live in your parents basement for the rest of your lives and never make anything of yourself. People just need to relax the tone here. It's a frickin free course on circuits! It's also people's decisions to do what the hell they please. Didn't know my dad was on this forum so much.
Monobass
wavecircle that would be great, I somehow missed your post above, I think once the course starts I would definitely like your help.

I'm planning to also corral a maths teacher I know into giving me some tutoring beforehand hihi
wavecircle
numbertalk wrote:
What is going on? These are musicians and synth enthusiasts. Bound for failure? Uh oh people, hear this, you are doomed to live in your parents basement for the rest of your lives and never make anything of yourself. People just need to relax the tone here. It's a frickin free course on circuits! It's also people's decisions to do what the hell they please. Didn't know my dad was on this forum so much.


People who take no interest in maths won't fail in life but they will certainly fail in physics. I am not talking about the wider context here.

Monobass, no problem. If you did maths 15 years ago you won't have any problem remembering it. We can do some algebra and some calculus. I think the 6.002 course said these are the prerequisites. Differential equations come later.
numbertalk
Who the heck is talking about physics (ok obviously physics is involved, but this is primarily a synth forum)? It's one thing to say "if anyone is serious about this course, you will definitely need to brush up on your math" and another to take this holier than thou obnoxious attitude (not so much you, more Hinton). What is wrong with curiosity and checking this course out no matter what? We're not talking about enrolling for a full degree and planning my damn life around this free class.
numbertalk
And for the record, I'm not a troll here. You can view my history of posts to see that. These replies just rubbed me the wrong way on the wrong day. I'm done hijacking this thread. But I will exit with a plea to drop the snooty and holier than thou attitudes. It's only the business of the person deciding to give this class a shot how seriously they want to take it etc... It shouldn't bother you if no one wants your help with math etc...
Monobass
Spanningtree wrote:
I know how it goes bringing your math skills back up to par. About 10 years ago I decided to take some additional engineering classes at the local college. They had to re-assess my math skills since it had been so long I was in school. I used the book below to do a deep dive boot camp over a few weeks to bone up as well as some of the schaum books. The schaum books I would recommend for large sets of solved problems and you can get one that is pretty specific for whatever your weak in (trig for me).

http://www.amazon.com/Mastering-Technical-Mathematics-Stan-Gibilisco/d p/0070248281/ref=sr_1_5?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1329510695&sr=1-5


this looks really good, I just picked up a copy for £12 second hand thumbs up
wavecircle
Curiosity is excellent, I think this course is an absolutely amazing opportunity for anyone interested in synths and general electronics. This is one of the best scientific institutions in the world offering free education. People shouldn't be put off by the maths though, if anything they should use this course as an excuse to get into maths, it can be very rewarding. Like I have said, I am happy to help people with their maths, I won't shout at anyone for not understanding right away. thumbs up
numbertalk
wavecircle wrote:
Curiosity is excellent, I think this course is an absolutely amazing opportunity for anyone interested in synths and general electronics. This is one of the best scientific institutions in the world offering free education. People shouldn't be put off by the maths though, if anything they should use this course as an excuse to get into maths, it can be very rewarding. Like I have said, I am happy to help people with their maths, I won't shout at anyone for not understanding right away. thumbs up


Sounds awesome. Thank you for the generous offer. I did 3 years of calculus when I earned my CS degree, and did quite well and actually enjoyed it, but it's been 12 years. I'm going to check out the book someone suggested on Amazon earlier here and feel things out. Would be great if I could manage to get something out of this course. I would take you up on the offer, but between work and being a parent & husband as well as trying to make music in my free time (what's that?), just would make it easier for me to get a book and read it in bed at night.
lizlarsen
I signed up as well! All of my electronics knowledge is contextual, after hundreds of hours of synth DIY and module development -- my partner in LZX handles all the more complex engineering. So while I think some of this will be review, I'm looking forward to fleshing out a broader understanding of all the basics in a holistic instead of SynthDIY-focused way.
Monobass
wavecircle wrote:
People shouldn't be put off by the maths though, if anything they should use this course as an excuse to get into maths, it can be very rewarding.


yeah. i used to love maths. then for some reason I did the wrong degree about things I had no interest in and grew to hate it. It was a free education and I even got a grant.... it would probably cost me about £40k to make that ill advised mistake if I was 18 now d'oh!
wavecircle
Same here, except I have done something about it just before the course fees triple. I did sound design at university first time round but have always found it very hard to make a reasonable living from it. Physics was always my favourite subject at school so I enrolled last year. I'll be 32 when I graduate but hopefully I can go on further than BSc.
Monobass
heh, I make reasonable living with sound design but now wish I had just done electronics.
bkbirge
I'll help with the remedial math, here's the first self evaluation quiz...

bkbirge
2nd quiz, not asking you to do this, just look at it, if it is completely a mystery then run don't walk to do some remedials...

ben jah men
^^^ fuck.

so the fact that I'm struggling in "college algebra" means I don't have a chance seriously, i just don't get it


despair.
decaying.sine
bkbirge wrote:
2nd quiz, not asking you to do this, just look at it, if it is completely a mystery then run don't walk to do some remedials...



2(1/2 log(x^2 + 6x +13) - 3/2 tan^-1(x+3/2))
Graham Hinton
Monobass wrote:
I agree about the tone of Graham's response.


My response was to somebody thinking that they could do the course and in the same breath saying that differential equations make them vomit. It isn't cool to make a virtue out of ignorance and it's worthy of a Brunellian put down.

In my experience most people have decided they don't like mathematics before they have had their first lesson and then they spend so much time grumbling about it they don't learn anything. All they are doing is proclaiming that they belong to Edison's 80%.

It's easy to shoot your mouth off on a forum, but those people won't be vocal when they drop out of the course.

Quote:

But having looking at the first three video lectures of the 6002 course I have to say he is basically right. The maths is not optional, it's not something which provides an extra insight into the material discussed, it is the material.


Exactly.
I know how much maths you will need because I've done it and after doing electronic engineering for 40 years I can honestly say that there has not been a day where I have not been grateful for it. You don't need the very advanced stuff all the time, but when the going gets tough you do and you do need an aptitude for algebra most of the time. Mathematics disciplines your mind to analyse the real problem, abstract and solve it and then apply it. I've never needed Divs, Grads and Curls, but I have needed the ability to think like that.

The other thing I can warn you of is that getting back into education once you have left is a lot harder. If you go through school and university it's a continuous process that trains your mind to accept the way educationalists teach. Once you get out into life and do other things it is much harder to get back into the habit and to maintain the concentration that will be needed. Ten hours a week is probably the absolute minimum.

Quote:
bring it on.


Now THAT is a better attitude.
Roycie Roller
qmmg
loydb
Graham Hinton wrote:
It isn't cool to make a virtue out of ignorance and it's worthy of a Brunellian put down.


applause

I thought the tone was perfectly fine. I went through CS mixed with EE nearly 25 years ago. My math was shaky then, and mostly gone now :( Looking at the textbook for this course, and the online notes, and realize that I'll have to basically re-learn calculus before I could successfully attempt it.

If you're going to take the course without the math background, be prepared to quickly be reduced to the role of spectator. You may or may not get any benefit from this, but you're kidding yourself if you think you're going to get through problem sets without the math.
Paradigm X
hmm, starting to feel like i shouldnt bother now. sad banana

I did one year of electronic engineering at college and three years of acoustics, and did a fair bit of maths then, but that was 15 years ago. You dont use much full on maths in acoustics on a daily baisis, at least in consultancy.

With a full time job, wife and kid, and trying to make stuff and write music, like matey above, i dont know when ill get time. Ill need to start now effectively, going thru the maths i know to catch up.

Graham has been a bit blunt, tbh, but hes almost certainly right.

But then nothing ventured, nothing gained, right? At least theres a few of us with various abilites who can help each other. Not evenbothered about getting a certificate, more just want to learn more, rather than just stuffing boards.

cHEERS
wavecircle
This course is going to be very wide ranging I feel. It isn't a synth building course although I am sure there will be audio applications. As useful as I think this course is, it isn't the be all and end all for synth building by a long shot. People should just try it, if they engage with it then great, if they don't, there are numerous other options.

For those who are panicking about their maths, just go on Khan's Academy, he's a great teacher, better than most of the people who taught me at least.
lilakmonoke
cool info! .. i already enrolled ... should activate some dead briancells if i complete it. thank god i have NO clue about electronics!
Monobass
Spanningtree wrote:
I know how it goes bringing your math skills back up to par. About 10 years ago I decided to take some additional engineering classes at the local college. They had to re-assess my math skills since it had been so long I was in school. I used the book below to do a deep dive boot camp over a few weeks to bone up as well as some of the schaum books. The schaum books I would recommend for large sets of solved problems and you can get one that is pretty specific for whatever your weak in (trig for me).

http://www.amazon.com/Mastering-Technical-Mathematics-Stan-Gibilisco/d p/0070248281/ref=sr_1_5?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1329510695&sr=1-5


I'm working through both 'Mastering Technical Mathematics' and the Schaum 'Basic Mathematics for Electricty and Electronics' in anticipation of the MITx course and I can reccOmend them. Getting my practical maths skill back up to scratch really quick.
polyroy
I'm still really tempted by this, but my only concern is wasting people's time. I did some acoustic related maths in Uni and got on alright with it, so I know that I can learn it, but it's just how much I'll need to know beforehand.

I guess I could just give it a go anyway as it's free, but I don't want to seem like a dick if I can't keep up with everyone else and drop out.
Monobass
I think it's ok. They obviously realise this course will be very attractive to a lot of people and that many will drop out (the majority even) and then many people will enrol and never even watch the first lecture.

I imagine the automated assessment stuff will be quite heavily frontloaded.
I think their machine learning experience will help them cope... and if nothing else trying and failing provides them with really useful data about how to improve the course next time.

I don't think they are naive about the reality of making access to the course completely free and completely unconditional.

They may not know how to cope with it yet, but they'll find out smile
polyroy
Fuck it, I'll enroll! Got nothing to lose really and I'll pick up some of the texts mentioned in this thread to brush up on some maths/physics related stuff.
gwaidan
Enrolled-looking forward to the ride....
loydb
I just got the textbook and spent the afternoon skimming. When someone said that the math *is* the course, they weren't joking. It is difficult to find a page without an equation on it. It isn't as calculus/diffyq heavy as I expected it to be, but if you aren't comfortable with them, you'll be done by chapter 4.

Anyway, this course should be called Mathematical Evaluation of Analog and Digital Circuits. If you're expecting "how to design a good filter," these are not the droids you're looking for.

Good luck.

Dead Banana

edit: It *does* look like the first few chapters are a great basic EE review (Ohm's Law, Kirchhoff, etc.).
Luka
So i cant use course materials on my ipad so im out confused
Laptop is waiting on parts to be working again so ill be a week or two behind before i can use their courseware :(
Monobass
Luka wrote:
So i cant use course materials on my ipad so im out confused
Laptop is waiting on parts to be working again so ill be a week or two behind before i can use their courseware :(


I had a quick look around on my iPhone this morning, what is it specifically that wasn't working on your iPad?
Luka
Video interface mainly

Videos will only work if they load in youtube app and then i have issues streaming - cant seem to pause it to let it load - it just runs in slow mo and stops. Frustrating.
Clockgate
The course has just started. hyper
Monobass
Yep I'm starting tonight. I'm glad it lets you get ahead with the homework.
Luka
Luka wrote:
Video interface mainly

Videos will only work if they load in youtube app and then i have issues streaming - cant seem to pause it to let it load - it just runs in slow mo and stops. Frustrating.


Anybody else have these issues? - wondering if it is my bad wireless or maybe i meed to update to ios5. Youtube works embedded in lots of places other than their website for me but not on thier site.
Monobass
it's a custom player, it has speed options and drives a text annotation panel too.

I'm guessing there isn't a Chrome browser for the iPad?
Buckyball
Luka wrote:
Luka wrote:
Video interface mainly

Videos will only work if they load in youtube app and then i have issues streaming - cant seem to pause it to let it load - it just runs in slow mo and stops. Frustrating.


Anybody else have these issues? - wondering if it is my bad wireless or maybe i meed to update to ios5. Youtube works embedded in lots of places other than their website for me but not on thier site.


I am able to play videos no problem on my iPhone 4S (with iOS 5.0.1). The video doesn't play embedded, though. It pops out to full-screen. Pausing and scrubbing work fine.

I do like watching the lectures on my laptop, though, as the custom player will let you play the videos at 125% and 150% of normal speed. 75% is also an option.
cleaninglady
Just started in on the Course today.

I'm having a crack at it but i don't know if i can handle the maths.

I never got to look at Calculus at school... (hides)
synaptech
I'm already wishing I'd paid a bit more attention from the back row of lectures. very frustrating

Let's hope the rust comes off quickly.
Clockgate
Wow, Maxwell's equations in the first week, them guys at MIT sure don't mess around! It's certainly a very different approach than when I did basic circuit analysis in my electronics degree. Saying that, it's good exercise for the brain cells.
Paradigm X
I take it you guys got an email then?

Ive reclicked my 'confirm' registration which i did at the time, and stil not got?

Cant see how to start without this email.
Sigh

Oh well.
Monobass
Go to the enrolment page and there is a log in link on the top right.
Paradigm X
d'oh!

cheers
LoveHertz
revtor wrote:


~Steve, algebra failure... I gravitated to the wood and metal shop.


oh thats good so you'll be just the guy to make us some lovely cabinets and nice modular panels.

clint
Paradigm X
Started the course then, bit worried itll be a bit over my head. Got a bit confused already, mainly about the polarity of currents and voltages - on the initial questions i got the number right but the polarity wrong.

Going to try to keep on top of it but its a big time commitment.

Been wondering why theyre doing it, is is a true altruistic thing? Theyve obv spent a lot of time and money getting all the videos together, the website, the course notes.

The schematic/modelling thing is very impressive too.

I couldnt find out if you dont hand in the homework whether youre 'kicked off', and cant at least watch the lectures etc, or you can watch them all, but not 'pass'.

Still, even at first, the analysis of systems is pretty useful.
Joe.
Paradigm X wrote:

Been wondering why theyre doing it, is is a true altruistic thing? Theyve obv spent a lot of time and money getting all the videos together, the website, the course notes.


You're a Beta tester. Usually Beta testers get nothing but bragging rights (and a few headaches), you on the other hand get access to awesome course material thumbs up
Paradigm X
Makes sense. hihi
Monobass
LoFi Junglist wrote:
Paradigm X wrote:

Been wondering why theyre doing it, is is a true altruistic thing? Theyve obv spent a lot of time and money getting all the videos together, the website, the course notes.


You're a Beta tester. Usually Beta testers get nothing but bragging rights (and a few headaches), you on the other hand get access to awesome course material thumbs up


yeah that's exactly it. They are also keeping up with their competitors, Stanford already have an equivalent program to MITx (which doesn't have any electronics courses).
Monobass
Well I just finished the week 1 homework and lab got 100% on both.

I'm not bragging, just saying because in my experience the lecture series problems are much harder than the actual graded homework!

I plugged away at the lecture series and I've learnt a lot and I can't honestly say yet I fully understand them at all, but just felt it was really important to say you don't need to understand them fully to get a good homework mark.

So don't give in yet if the lectures made you go eek! plenty of time to get into the swing of things I think 8_)
satindas
Monobass wrote:
Well I just finished the week 1 homework and lab got 100% on both.


Me too! And I AM bragging cos I I've not got a clue how I did it ! SlayerBadger! SlayerBadger! SlayerBadger! w00t hyper
akrylik
To all of you taking 6.002x: Huge props to you and I wish you all the best! I think people who are willing to take a risk and learn at any age are seriously the single most important ingredient in any healthy community. we're not worthy
osterchrisi
bkbirge wrote:
When did it become vogue to say "maths" instead of "math" or is that just one of the many differences between English English and American English?


Well, you're still on a modular synth forum wink

I enrolled too by the way. At least I could make it through the first week without troubles but let's see what is still comming up there...
Monobass
oh I didn't realise the "in vogue" comment might have been about the Make Noise module hihi

I would probably have been 5% less likely to buy a Maths had Tony incorrectly named it Math. Or maybe less likely to be in a position where I'm considering buying a third...
Ianh
just going to sail until i sink as far as this course is concerned.
numbertalk
akrylik wrote:
To all of you taking 6.002x: Huge props to you and I wish you all the best! I think people who are willing to take a risk and learn at any age are seriously the single most important ingredient in any healthy community. we're not worthy


That's what I'm saying! Got my lab and homework done today. Hanging in there so far.
Spandex
here's a question someone might be able to help me with (can't bear to use the fisherprice "Discussion" thing on the MITX site). thanks in advance for your brain time.

K.. so voltages are potential differences so you have to measure one relative to another. you need to choose a ground. doing the first week on this course made me realise that i'm confused about this. i always thought that the AC supply to my house actually changed direction with a real, absolute centre point of "0". Is that just rubbish?

I guess I'm asking if the whole idea of "ground" is always just a mathematical one... or is there a real thing that often gets used as a reference point from which to measure "absolute" potential differences?

That kind of leads on to another question.. which is... if I had a 24volt DC supply.. can I make a +12v, 0v and -12v simply by building a voltage divider with two equal resistors and putting the ground in the centre. Obviously, I'll get those readings... but is that then ok to power/test a module? The current will be within the expected limits so I guess it is? But if I then patched it into my modular, is the ground in the modular PSU different?
wmonk
Spandex wrote:

I guess I'm asking if the whole idea of "ground" is always just a mathematical one... or is there a real thing that often gets used as a reference point from which to measure "absolute" potential differences?

In a lot of devices, especially home appliance ones, the circuit ground is connected to "earth" thru your mains plug. So earth is used a lot as reference point. But I won't call it an absolute potential difference, mainly because 'difference' suggests something relative.

Spandex wrote:

That kind of leads on to another question.. which is... if I had a 24volt DC supply.. can I make a +12v, 0v and -12v simply by building a voltage divider with two equal resistors and putting the ground in the centre. Obviously, I'll get those readings... but is that then ok to power/test a module? The current will be within the expected limits so I guess it is? But if I then patched it into my modular, is the ground in the modular PSU different?

Well, you can make a dual supply that way, and I do that a lot. You would have to connect the two grounds together to make it work correctly of course. Circuits need the common ground when interacting.
But as I said, a lot of times 'ground' is connected to earth. You don't want your negative rail of the 24V PSU be connected to earth when you do this, otherwise you might have a short. (or disconnect the modular from earth, that would work too)
Spandex
Right. Thanks. I think I'm starting to get a clue here.

tbh, it's all very clear from this 6002 course (which is really good).. and it's not like i didn't have a decent grounding in a-level physics and all the basic equations anyway... but i'm having to unlearn some sloppy thinking that's been in my head for 20 years. takes some shifting.
Monobass
it is really good. and I've just got a good score on the 2nd week homework and lab.. but I'm really not able to find the time to go beyond that. Have a feeling the mid-term is going to be a bit of a car crash as I feel I'm really not exploring the content broadly enough.

But I'm learning loads. while I can't deny I'd like a certificate I'm not sure how likely that is right now! and it's not really why i'm doing it.. if only I didn't have this damn pride...
Spandex
yeah, i don't want to give up smile

but i'm also becoming a little frustrated, in that i'm finding a lot of it is just maths exercises... solving endless simultaneous equations feels like i'm just cranking a handle.

i wish there was more "give a formula for x" and less "work out the actual value of x for these value of a,b,c,d,e and f". Don't get me wrong, i'd be all over it if I was building a circuit that did something I was interested in.. but for endless example circuits with random networks of resistors and voltage/current sources, it's getting a bit tedious.
Monobass
I don't mind the cranking so much, I need the practice tbh. I just don't have the time.
gwaidan
Positive here so far-finding that it's giving me what I wanted from a uni-level course by forcing me to learn a theoretical framework that will take me wherever I want to go rather than fudging it until I hit a brick wall as I have been doing up to now-can see the wisdom of Hinton's cruel-but-fair comments on the difference between an engineer and a technician now. The Boolean logic stuff in week 2 was a nice breather from the circuit analysis equations. Looks like we design real circuits with MOSFETS next...

PS if ya want the textbook cheap check out ABE (http://www.abebooks.com/). I bought the Indian version of the text (identical to American) for $30 including postage and looks fine-just arrived this week. nanners
polyroy
I bailed on it. After looking through the first week of lecture notes etc, it struck me that I'm in way over my head and I don't have the commitment for it.
loydb
Spandex wrote:
but i'm also becoming a little frustrated, in that i'm finding a lot of it is just maths exercises... solving endless simultaneous equations feels like i'm just cranking a handle.


Well, a bunch of people did *say* this was going to be pretty much a math course... But I understand your frustration, this is why I didn't enroll.
numbertalk
What I am hearing from most of the people here who were interested in this course was that as SDIY enthusiasts they were interested in learning more. From this perspective, even if someone decided to drop from doing the homework and were stil able to get something from the lectures, good for you. Anyone, especially with a snotty attitude, who would discourage anyone interested in learning and bettering themselves, especially from a free online course, is a prick in my book. So to hell with calling Hinton's comments "fair".
Monobass
loydb wrote:
Spandex wrote:
but i'm also becoming a little frustrated, in that i'm finding a lot of it is just maths exercises... solving endless simultaneous equations feels like i'm just cranking a handle.


Well, a bunch of people did *say* this was going to be pretty much a math course... But I understand your frustration, this is why I didn't enroll.


I think you're missing the point here, I don't think Spandex's frustration is with the Maths, just the amount of 'handle cranking' like he says.

There is plenty to get from the lectures for an SDIY enthusiast. While the first couple of weeks are teaching you the tools that'll be used throughout the course (the source of the handle cranking), it pretty soon jumps after that to very practical stuff like using MOSFETs to build logic gates and then Op-Amps.

So if it all started too abstract for people, maybe the practical stuff that follows will help.
Joe.
You have todo the "endless" exercises; It's called rote learning (or learning through repetition), if you don't rote learn a formula then the only option is being able to derive that formula in rl, on the fly. That's time consuming, and impractical.

The only way you can do timed exams is if these formula's (and your ability to know which ones to use) comes naturally.

Employees like to know know you can pass Timed exams, because it shows you can work under pressure, and you know your subject material.
Anyone can skim a text book, bookmark pages and then take hours performing a simple task; checking the process and formulas multiple times in their reference book. As learned students you're meant to become better than that.

I never agreed in with the process while i was doing my apprenticeship, because i think some mistakes can be made if you're just working from memory and not using a reference notebook.
I eventually changed my mind though, being efficient is much more important that simply being "capable".

Stick in there guys, it only becomes easier with time thumbs up
active
it's intense, i'm struggling already, but i am going to push it through. thanks for the heads up on the foreign books! i beet the biggest difference will be reference to voltage later on which should be a fine thing to work around. and if not, just more practice!
loydb
Yeah, the grinding is actually the point of it all. Eventually, you get to the point that it's not a grind.

If it was fun, everyone would do it w00t
Monobass
Yeah believe me, I know grinding! I did a mechanical engineering degree.

It just feels a little uneven on this course, I think it's probably due to the format and course being so new.
Spandex
yeah... like if i wanted to teach someone to program i wouldn't make them spend the first 3 weeks matching brackets and thinking about operator precedence in postfix, prefix or infix systems... before finally letting them draw a square on the screen in week 4.

personally, i think it's better to start with stuff that gives a more instant bang for your buck.. and THEN show the underpinnings. you're always using some level of abstraction in EE and Comp Sci - as long as you're clear about that, I don't see any reason that you can't skip around the levels to keep the narrative interesting.
akrylik
I can't say that MIT professors will be good at motivating their students to stick with the material. Remember that they are fed with a constant stream of probably the most self-motivated students in the world! Its not going to be this nice story with cliff-hangers and plot twists, but more like a solid-dense-no-space-wasted kind of experience that if you can get through you will really appreciate AFTERWARDS nanners

So when they teach they assume you are in it for the long haul baby!

They have a saying at MIT: Learning at MIT is like trying to drink from a firehose.

The other MIT meme is how you can basically split the student population into 2 groups based on what they think the acronym IHTFP means:

group 1: I have truly found paradise!
group 2: I hate this fuckin place!

You can probably guess which students are the ones who came to MIT with their motivational jetpacks already ignited. BOOM!
Spandex
Ha smile right. Yeah - guess the perspective is different when u actually have time. I'm coming at it in half hours of snatched freedom, watching the lectures at 1.5 speed d'oh!
Monobass
It's going to take them a while to understand their new online cohort.

I guess when you have a body of essentially anonymous students, who you never really get to understand or know, the only real measure of success is pass rate.. maybe the approach to maximising that pass rate means a style of course that is quite different to the style required to satisfy the regular MIT student body.

As long as standards are maintained, I guess they can only ever strive for quantity of passes over quality of passes.
loydb
I would hope, given that it's MIT, that they won't be at all interested in maximizing the pass rate. Especially in an engineering discipline. If people truly learn the material, the pass rate takes care of itself.
Spandex
Well, for all my carping, at least they care a lot more than that... otherwise it'd be "there's a library, here's a syllabus, learn it and then pass the exam. Kthxbai"
Monobass
loydb wrote:
I would hope, given that it's MIT, that they won't be at all interested in maximizing the pass rate. Especially in an engineering discipline. If people truly learn the material, the pass rate takes care of itself.


That's pretty naive. It's kinda ridiculous to think they wouldn't want to maximise the pass rate as long as their standards are maintained! (the context I clearly stated)
theglyph
Bump!

How's everyone doing? This is a bit different than how the progression went when I studied EE but it's nice to see it from a bit of a different perspective. Lumped element abstraction as a way to understand and utilize electronics in the "real word" is a refreshing way to think about the process of analyzing circuits. It's not new to me but just a different way of thinking about it.
Monobass
really appreciating the subject matter, have yet to learn anything that I can't see the point in. Massively struggling to find the time to do the homework though alongside working and childcare.. all my energy goes into my 1 year old son at the moment.

The estimated 10 hours a week is an underestimation for me. I reckon I might scrape a C grade, so to be honest I'm already past caring about the Certificate but I will complete it I think. I'd much rather do it at half speed, hope they consider that kind of option in the future.
theglyph
Monobass, Have you noticed that the homework is very forgiving. You can check it over and over again until you get it right without penalty. The same goes for the labs. I think based on this alone the pace is great considering we are all beta testers. thumbs up
Ianh
I have been getting straight 100% on the home work and labs but fear the impending midterm. I have noticed i am simply learning how to find the answer not necessarily solve the problem. In other words getting alot of formulas but not necessarily understanding how or why they work. Thus not entirely understanding where it is necessary to apply them.


Any one in Nyc interested in a study group some time before the midterm?
Totally serious.
Monobass
theglyph wrote:
Monobass, Have you noticed that the homework is very forgiving. You can check it over and over again until you get it right without penalty. The same goes for the labs. I think based on this alone the pace is great considering we are all beta testers. thumbs up


yeah and I got 100% on the first couple of weeks due to that, but 3 + 4 have been a washout, my only problem is time and energy!
gwaidan
I think the midterm will be alright-with 24 hours to do it it's basically an online equivalent of a takehome/open book exam.
I agree homework for weeks 3 and 4 has been really tough but I've eventually had a-ha moments which have gotten me through-pretty clear at this point the textbook readings are essential and the intention of the homework/labs is that they are learning/extension exercises rather than straight revision. Has all been pretty useful so far.
Monobass
I can generally only find about 2 hours max time to study out of any 24 hour period, which is why I'm pretty sceptical about the mid-term. I'm just really pleased to have access to the teaching and resources.
lysander
I've been doing the course too, mainly using the textbook because its the easiest to read anywhere.
I've found it a bit slow going for some things, like it will drill down for dozens of pages on the same thing - but to be fair a lot of that stuff are reminders for me as I studied electrical engineering and semiconductors a long time ago ( long enough to forget pretty much everything ), and this way it does get into your head. I think its a very good textbook.
The coursework although not particularly difficult does take a lot of time to do, my last two sunday evenings have been swallowed by it and I'm dreading doing this week's tonight.

Doing this course is forcing me to go through this material quicker than I'd do on my own though so thats a good thing.
bookends
Count me in for a NYC midterm study group
gwaidan
Got an A in midterm-where do I sign up for tri-lambda? hihi

lysander
Sign me up too I just got 100% on it lol
bookends
I was pretty apprehensive about the midterm but it wasn't that bad. Bring on the pain I guess.
gwaidan
And now we will rule the world...... hihi

Interesting to find out there are 120 000 of us.

http://www.edxonline.org/
bookends
There was a NYTimes article about it today too:

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/03/education/harvard-and-mit-team-up-to -offer-free-online-courses.html?hp
gwaidan
Just hit 60% on running total so guess I've passed already. Bring on the final...
gwaidan
Just finished the exam. Yay!!!!!!
bkbirge
gwaidan wrote:
Just finished the exam. Yay!!!!!!


Congrats on sticking with it and passing!
gwaidan
Thank you! How many of us wigglers made it thru the final?

Personally it was quite a relief to get through it. The final exam was a real doozy-took me 7 hours and one question there you probably needed to be Eric Barbour to answer with any confidence (involved calculating the small-signal gain of a triode valve circuit!)

Good article about the whole thing:

http://www.i-programmer.info/professional-programmer/accreditation/435 2-mitx-experimental-course-completed-a-report.html
lysander
Made it through to !
I found the final fairly easy but indeed very long, I think I easily spent more than 4 hours on it.
Overall I loved the course, although I'm kind of relieved it is finished as I can now have free sunday evenings instead of being busy doing the homework and labs ! smile
I've already started a few books to keep learning, one on filter design the other dealing with practical aspects, and I'm also reading the electronotes.

What I'm missing though is a good reference on transistor circuit design, covering both the theory and practical designs.
I was a bit disappointed the course only covered FETs.
If anyone has got some suggestions ?

EDIT: I have found this:
http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/electrical-engineering-and-computer-science  /6-012-microelectronic-devices-and-circuits-fall-2009/
http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/34219

Which looks like exactly what I wanted !
Paradigm X
I, sadly, failed at the first hurdle (first 'exam' or whatever.)

Time is an absolute killer with a full time job and a two year old. He (then we) got really ill during the second week and that was the end of that.

It was well over my head anyway tbph, i think i need some really basic books to begin with.

Big respect to all those who got thru/are getting thru!

Congrats.

Ben
thumbs up

Lysander, doug wellington found a free book on transistors, worth a quick look in this thread.

http://electro-music.com/forum/topic-51598.html
Monobass
Congrats to everyone who saw it through smile

I just couldn't find nearly enough time to devote in the end. Once my son is at school and they have honed the course further I fully intend to nail it!
lysander
Thanks for the link Paradigm !
I'm lucky on that front that I don't have kids yet, we're planning some though so I'm doing all the learning and DIY I can while I still have some spare time !
daren
This came up for registration again.

How was everyone's experience who made it through? Have you found it useful in what goes on in the synthdiy side of things?

I signed up and was combing through all the suggested readings. I gotta brush up on my calc!
lysander
The course is very good and will give you a solid fundation for understanding electronics.
There is a LOT more to learn to really understand synth DIY but it's an excellent starting point.
prscrptn
Where is the registration? seriously, i just don't get it
bookends
https://www.edx.org/courses/MITx/6.002x/2013_Spring/about

I really enjoyed the class and would recommend it to anyone that's interested. Wish they had another electronics course on offer, but I might take this in the meantime:

https://www.coursera.org/course/dsp
very angry mobster
prscrptn wrote:
Where is the registration? seriously, i just don't get it

https://www.edx.org/

I just signed up! I don't know anything about electronics. 12 hours a week might be a bit intense at times...


Shannon
glitchpop
I thinking of signing up. I'm prepared for the fact I have little maths background (and to learn that as well). But I'm really interested in hearing from those who enrolled last year as noobs. How did you go? w00t ? or Dead Banana ?
Paradigm X
Personally, I went Dead Banana but this was due to a lack of time sadly, work, wife, child etc jsut made it impossible to spend enough time on it.

It is essential to spend a lot of time on it to get anywhere...
Monobass
Paradigm X wrote:
Personally, I went Dead Banana but this was due to a lack of time sadly, work, wife, child etc jsut made it impossible to spend enough time on it.


Exactly the same for me. It required an amount of study time that just wasn't remotely possible for me to do.

Paradigm X wrote:
It is essential to spend a lot of time on it to get anywhere...


I think they underestimated the time required for study per week, which was a dissapointment in a way but understandable considering what a new thing the first iteration of the course was.

I enjoyed what I managed to do, but only kept up to speed for the first 3 weeks. After repeatedly falling asleep whilst studying late at night I realised I was pushing myself into oblivion.

I could definitely handle it once my son is older and not getting up at 6am though smile
lysander
The course does require a large investment of time.
I already knew most of the stuff so I could read the textbook chapters quickly during the week but the homework still took up most of my sunday afternoons / evenings for the duration of the course.

I would encourage anyone with doubts to try it and see how it goes though, you've really got little to lose ! Worst case you get an excellent free textbook and lectures that you can study at your own pace if you don't have enough spare time to follow the schedule.
Monobass
oh yeah it's totally worth doing it until you collapse smile
kozepz
I've subscribed also.
Did already watched the 6002 courses on youtube which were very helpful, but it's a good thing to do some homework too instead of only watching.
wbkennedy1
i just signed up! but when does the course start? it just says "Spring 2013" on the site. did i miss something? seriously, i just don't get it
gwaidan
The course is a lot of work but that's because you get a lot out of it. It wrecked my social life for 3 months but I have no regrets whatsoever. Try it and see!
Paradigm X
gwaidan wrote:
my social life


wtf is one of those lol cry
Monobass
I lost my social life and all i got in return was this wonderful son hihi
Monobass
Although maybe it's time to boycott MIT...

http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2013/01/15/humanity-deficit/bj8oThPDw zgxBSHQt3tyKI/story.html?s_campaign=sm_tw
wbkennedy1
am i playin around in the EECS playground all by myself?

anybody takin' 6.002x this semester? abstractions! kcl! kvl!
imma gonna flunk..
Monobass
This year I find myself deeply involved in the EECS playground but it's more a case of sorting thousands of resistors into little bags hihi

Would LOVE to do this again but there ain't enough hours in the day. cry
daren
wbkennedy1 wrote:
am i playin around in the EECS playground all by myself?

anybody takin' 6.002x this semester? abstractions! kcl! kvl!
imma gonna flunk..


I'm about halfway with the first week's worth of assignments, but it's taking a bit too much of my time. Gonna try to finish up what's due on Sunday night, but I doubt that I'll get even close for a decent grade.
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