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WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

Loving the Buchla 200e
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Buchla, EMS & Serge  
Author Loving the Buchla 200e
Heathfinnie
After only a day I must say it's one of my favorite (top 5) synths I've ever used. Talk about a STEEP learning curve though!
parasitk
C'mon, you have to give us more than that! hyper
wetterberg
heath heath heath... put your audio and video where your text is...





Mr. Green
shamann
What are the other four in your top five?
Heathfinnie
The other four would probably be CS-80, Prophet 5, Buchla Music Easel and my 5U modular.
amnesia
I totally agree
It instantly became my top 3 synths..

I havent found it hard to understand but I think thats because I have a Serge

Anyway my top 3

BUCHLA 200e
EMS SYNTHIA AKS/ VCS3
SERGE

oh ha ha and they are all in this forum :-)

Just need the Wiard
cbm
I'm glad you're digging it. If you have any knotty questions, ask away.
panda30y
I have to say from playing with it for only an hour, I found it very enjoyable and definitely one of my favorites. I wouldn't necessarily say the sounds wowed me (don't misunderstand me, because I do like it), but the interface is just wonderful, and I feel creating better content is the most important thing afterall. I didn't have too hard of a time understanding it aside from the 250e, but Xart had a few great quick demonstrations.
fluxivity
i've had a 200e for lil over a year now and I'm just starting to get to the bottom of the 250e sequencer. it's a downright 'trippy' piece of hardware. Finally with a growing knowledge of the jump function its spitting out music.
SynthBaron
I keep hearing of this "steep" learning curve...but I've never heard anyone explain it.
panda30y
SynthBaron wrote:
I keep hearing of this "steep" learning curve...but I've never heard anyone explain it.


There's just such a dense amount of functions and features imbedded in each module. Also since the infrastructure is digital, there are submenus that have to be accessed I know with some of the wave morphing functions on the 261e and the filter module (model # escapes me). And the 250e still pretty much escapes me even with a few explanations.

I'm not a buchla owner though and have only spent an hour with one, but this is what I feel would trouble most people.
ex_dead_teenager
Audio audio audio!

or maybe video video video!

I've heard the same thing about learning curves on the Buchla and I'm curious to see how this works out with me. Playing the 200 there didn't seem to be too steep a curve generally, there are modules on that synth I'd need some real time to get my head around but the way it seemed was more that using it regularly would be more revelatory in nature. I left feeling like I'd spend three hours and barely scratched the surface of what this instrument is capable of but I also felt that given enough time (like years maybe) I could probably learn almost all it's secrets.

The modules I want to work with more the next time I go back are the Voltage Processor and that crazy-ass filter with all the envelope followers and sliders. Kirk, the teacher who got me set up demoed the CV processor and accidentally used it to microtune the touchplate, I bet with a bit of experimentation and a better understanding of the principals at work one could get all sorts of exotic effects just from that one module.

The 200e is a different beast though I bet there's all sorts of intreaguing features squirrelled away in the digital architecture of the thing.

I'm jealous you've got one on hand you can just sit in front of and work with whenever you like.
prscrptn
It's really not that difficult a machine to understand, it's just not set-up like a typical subtractive synthesizer.
Some of the modules have differnt names and functions, but the interface is what makes the 200e so great.
Heathfinnie
I agree, it's not so much the functions as most of them are fairly straight forward, but you have lots of things such as quadrature envelopes, quantized voltages, stored random voltages, and just different names for functions that have other names on subtractives, and there are lots of things in the menus of some of the modules (291e filter comes to mind). I haven't even started trying to learn the 250e yet.
alt-mode
Actually, the 291e is the module that causes me the most anguish in the 200e. It is an incredibly power module but it has a !@#$^&ing 2-line LED screen! The reason I like modulars is because of the physical interface - being able to see what is going on by the location of the knobs, sliders, and patch cords. Menus are for impersonal digital synths and don't belong in modulars except for "set it and forget it" modules like a MIDI interface. Dead Banana
ndkent
alt-mode wrote:
Actually, the 291e is the module that causes me the most anguish in the 200e. It is an incredibly power module but it has a !@#$^&ing 2-line LED screen! The reason I like modulars is because of the physical interface - being able to see what is going on by the location of the knobs, sliders, and patch cords. Menus are for impersonal digital synths and don't belong in modulars except for "set it and forget it" modules like a MIDI interface. Dead Banana


The LED is small but doesn't bug me because, hey, there is a quite unexpected inclusion of a sequencer in a triple filter...

I'm not so happy with the single set of knobs and the toggle button for the separate filters. At least you can get to more than one filter at a time with voltage control so I think the amount it does in the small space is compensation for what's left out.
cbm
panda30y wrote:
Also since the infrastructure is digital, there are submenus that have to be accessed I know with some of the wave morphing functions on the 261e and the filter module (model # escapes me).

The only current Buchla modules that feature an LCD are the 225e MIDI interface/preset manager (two here), the 291e Triple Morphing Filter, the 222e Kinesthetic Input Port, and the 206e Preset Manager section. The oscillators don't have menus.
cbm
SynthBaron wrote:
I keep hearing of this "steep" learning curve...but I've never heard anyone explain it.

I don't think the learning curve is really all that steep, although the modules are crazy-dense. The learning curve is as much an un-learning curve in that, for best results, you have to approach it without bringing a bunch of of subtractive synthesis baggage with you.
cbm
ndkent wrote:
I'm not so happy with the single set of knobs and the toggle button for the separate filters. At least you can get to more than one filter at a time with voltage control so I think the amount it does in the small space is compensation for what's left out.

Yeah... imagine how big this module would have to be if it had knobs for all the parameters of the filters and the sequencer. I'm guessing triple-wide, maybe quad.
ndkent
cbm wrote:
ndkent wrote:
I'm not so happy with the single set of knobs and the toggle button for the separate filters. At least you can get to more than one filter at a time with voltage control so I think the amount it does in the small space is compensation for what's left out.

Yeah... imagine how big this module would have to be if it had knobs for all the parameters of the filters and the sequencer. I'm guessing triple-wide, maybe quad.


Well I agree that knobs for the sequencer would make the thing huge but the one set of knobs for 3 filters is a loss in realtime manipulation. I bought a 291e, but it brings back memories of why I didn't buy Don's compromised OBMx or the Access Virus (shared knobs for vitally tweakable parameters)
cbm
ndkent wrote:
Well I agree that knobs for the sequencer would make the thing huge but the one set of knobs for 3 filters is a loss in realtime manipulation.

It would still be at least a dual width panel though, wouldn't it?. There would have to be four knobs per filter (freq, resonance, amplitude and modulation).

I'm not saying that this would be a bad thing, just a big thing.
fluxivity
we were moving into a small place when I had an unexpected windfall that led to the ditching of a 5u and acquiring of 200e. The density is what's amazing about it. It's not that the modules or the system have a steep learning curve, it's just with something as dense as the 250e it takes a while to really get down to what its all about. A fair amount of exploring side avenues and losing ones way thankfully, blessedly occurs. I always love the giddy idealistc phase of discovering a piece of tech. If only it was as interesting sonically/externally as it is personally. Eno always talks about finding what it is that thus and such piece of gear does that no other gear will do and then using it for that thing and I guess that's what I meant above about finally getting the seq to produce music. Its a synergy of knowledge and expectations; I know what it does, so i learn more what I like about it and next time I go to it I have a refined set of expectations as to what me and it are gonna get going together. Often time one switch or knob or patch is all it takes to bring something from the esoteric to the visceral level of listenability.
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