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Patrick Gleeson
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Author Patrick Gleeson
odecahedron
ive been smashing Rainbow Delta alot lately on someones recommendation...

can anyone suggest any other works by him that they'd consider stand-out?

really like what ive heard so far 8_)
JohnLRice
I used to have his version of The Planets in high school and really enjoyed it but someone I loaned it to never returned it to me. :-(
odecahedron
u mean he reworked Gustav Holst!? something wonderful
JohnLRice
Yup! Modular no less! thumbs up Unfortunately it has never made it to CD.

From Wiki page:
Gleeson recorded a number of solo albums, starting with Beyond the
Sun - An Electronic Portrait of Holst's "The Planets" in 1976, to which Walter Carlos contributed the sleeve notes. The album was nominated for a "best engineered recording-classical" Grammy in 1976.[1]

http://www.discogs.com/Patrick-Gleeson-Beyond-The-Sun-An-Electronic-Po rtrait-Of-Holsts-The-Planets/release/96009

http://www.amazon.com/Electronic-Portrait-Performing-Polyphonic-Synthe sizer/dp/B002LNEOJ2
odecahedron
oh kewl- thanks mate! thumbs up
studio1dk
The planets was made with a Big emu modular. And the famous blue box - voice cards which was complete analog synths.
flo
No further recommendations, but I thought I'd share this pic of Gleeson with Herbie Hancock that I always enjoyed. If he's responsible for the awesome modular works Hancock did in the 70ies, I'm in eternal gratefulness for it applause

budz
Awesome pic screaming goo yo
Morley
studio1dk wrote:
The planets was made with a Big emu modular. And the famous blue box - voice cards which was complete analog synths.


I had a small EMU that had those cards. Neat things. Kind of like the ARP 2500 voice channels. Very useful in a small modular.
revmutt
He's great on Herbie Hancock Sextant. I don't remember liking any of his solo stuff, I'll have to go back and listen to the Holst.
budz
His work with Herbie is just jaw dropping to me. 'Crossings' is one of my favourite albums! Love 'Sextant' as well.
AntManBee
There's a disgruntled customer review of Herbie Hancock's 'Sextant' on amazon.com from Patrick Gleeson who claims that "they weren't Herbie's innovations, they were mine".

http://www.amazon.com/Sextant-Herbie-Hancock/product-reviews/B0012GMX5 Q/ref=cm_cr_pr_btm_link_next_2?ie=UTF8&pageNumber=2&showViewpoints=0&s ortBy=bySubmissionDateDescending

It's a little sad to see a musician complaining that their contributions were inadequately represented in a few recordings by an artist of the stature of Herbie Hancock (and the same goes for Malcolm Cecil in regard to Stevie Wonder). "The lady doth protest too much, methinks."
budz
I don't think it comes across as too negative - the first review he wrote on that page shows he loved the work that he was involved in. I think he's a bit disappointed about the strange reactions from the critics and that he doesn't get more credit in retrospect. I think he probably has a point - definitely about the jazz press - although on the other hand most people simply don't bother reading liner notes and they generally don't care how a recording was made.
ndkent
Yeah his "Planets " is called Beyond the Sun and never made it to CD. He played his Polyphonic Emu modular and the album came out at the same time as Tomita's. His got a W. Carlos endorsement on the back cover saying something like "hooray, now I don't have to record it. It got props for not making big changes like Tomita. It's not bad at all but not that thrilling. He ads some ambient sounds but plays it conservative. Nothing on Tomita's Moog for lead sounds or dramatic expressiveness, though more than a few think Tomita went too far.

He also did a Star Wars synth cover album.

Yes Rainbow Delta is really great. I've not heard of him doing anything like it.

He did do The Four Seasons sequenced on the Synclavier using FM (like the Francesco Zappa album). He had sold the Emu. Again not uninteresting but not a masterpiece. One interesting technique he seems to have sequenced everything and recorded in 2 passes in sync, once for the left and right channel.
odecahedron
woah - one guy slams Gleeson pretty hard. opinions are funny...

just heard sextant - pretty deeeep... and while not a modular heavy track, o really love this one:
Soy Sos
Yup, looooooove Sextant!
I wasn't really aware of Gleeson's role
till I read the liner notes on my copy of the album.
kindredlost
Rainbow Delta is one of my top synth recording faves of all time. Probably more influential for me than anything by Carlos or Tomita simply because I could identify with the sequencer and pre-new age sounding synth work than I could the classical synth renderings. His synthetic horn patches are uncompromising on Arrival Music. Not perfectly sample-like but more dreamlike. Very creamy. La Grange Point Five is hard to beat by anyone.

His work on Apocalypse Now is pretty nice as well. If you get a copy of the special director's cut multi-DVD package it has the music portion covered with some of the pics from the EMu era modular. It's sketchy and come and go but what is there is very nice.

I have a recent release (Slide) from him but it isn't anywhere as compelling as Rainbow Delta.

There is something organic yet sci-fi fantanstic sounding about Rainbow Delta. I really like the Frank Stella styled cover art which was what caught my eye initially and the reason I bought it. I ripped this to digital format when I got my first DAT recorder back in the day. One of the first vinyl conversions I had to do right away. I listen to it at least every 6 months or so still. Absolutely rules.

The vinyl release is still available at Discogs and there are mp3 rips all over the internet. This one is a classic which any self respecting EM listener should own.
budz
kindredlost wrote:
His work on Apocalypse Now is pretty nice as well.


Aw yeah I forgot about this. His stuff works so well in the film.
emdot_ambient
AntManBee wrote:
It's a little sad to see a musician complaining that their contributions were inadequately represented in a few recordings by an artist of the stature of Herbie Hancock (and the same goes for Malcolm Cecil in regard to Stevie Wonder).

I never heard that Malcolm Cecil complained about his recognition...he shared a grammy for his work with Wonder. Nothing to complain about there (unless he was grossly underpaid).
AntManBee
emdot_ambient wrote:
AntManBee wrote:
It's a little sad to see a musician complaining that their contributions were inadequately represented in a few recordings by an artist of the stature of Herbie Hancock (and the same goes for Malcolm Cecil in regard to Stevie Wonder).

I never heard that Malcolm Cecil complained about his recognition...he shared a grammy for his work with Wonder. Nothing to complain about there (unless he was grossly underpaid).

As recently as a BBC Radio 4 documentary about TONTO Malcolm Cecil has complained that, as time went by, he & Robert Margouleff received diminishing recognition for their work on Stevie Wonder's albums (although, arguably, Wonder's greatest album 'Songs In The Key Of Life' contained very little from Cecil or Margouleff). And I see that Cecil has removed Margouleff's name from the current reissue of the TONTO's Expanding Headband recordings.

The world is littered with side-men whose career went into decline after their work with great artists had finished. Great artists need side-men but not as much as side-men need great artists.
odecahedron
the 7/8 section at the 12 minute mark on the A-side (Rainbow Delta) soooooo goooood.

really glad i turned this stone over
sundog
Spotted this via the Wire news page.

You'll Know When You Get There: HERBIE HANCOCK AND THE MWANDISHI BAND by BOB GLUCK
http://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/Y/bo10327415.html

The website includes a lovely quote from Patrick Gleeson.

Chapter 8 of the book is tantalisingly entitled Quadraphonic Sound System: Patrick Gleeson on Tour and Sextant.

This thread prompted me to give Julian Priester's Love, Love a spin this week. Gleeson has credits for co-production, mixing as well as synths. It has an amazing sound.
Mikael488
Patrick Gleeson is one of my favorite synthesists and I had a long email conversation with him a few years ago. At that point he'd gotten the rights back to The Four Seasons, the Vivaldi's warhorse he did on the Synclavier II (using FM synthesis), and was working on regaining the rights to Beyond the Sun. He didn't mention anything about Rainbow Delta though.

I think "Delta" is his best solo album by far, though I like his electronic realization of Holst's The Planets as well (in fact, I prefer it to Tomita's version)

I'd love to have both albums on CD.

Here are some interesting comments by Gleeson on Rainbow Delta:
"Rainbow Delta was done entirely on the combined machine that had the digital scanning keyboard and memory driving the two prophets 10's (single keyboard), the Emu modular and the 16 channel "blue box" of large analog voices. It's been awhile, of course, but I think there were something like 6 oscillators, 2 VCA's, 3 transient generators, etc., per voice in the Blue Box. Don't recall what the filtering situation was. Probably just one big multi-mode VCF and a couple of less elaborate VCF's used more for signal shaping than for transient generated filter control. I've not yet become a fan of double VCF's, as per the virtual analog Access Indigo, etc. "

"We afterward performed side 2 live on a college concert tour (Lenny Pickett on a wind-controller-driven Emu modular and on tenor sax, and a guitar player whose name I've forgotten). The neat thing about the rig for live-performance is that you could actually orchestrate in real time--play a line, loop it in memory, then via the switching matrix that the Emu guys added to my modular, I could assign it to different voices on either or both prophets while playing against it live with one or more of the large bluebox voices. Of course, in terms of present-day capabilities where so many synths are multi-timbral, it was somewhat limited, but for the 70's it was pretty mind-blowing. "

"I programmed ithe bluebox by putting the card out on an extender. The card had tiny switches you worked on with a miniature screw-driver--about the size of a dental instrument! Same for the rotary pots--they were about a half-centimeter across. "

"Our original idea was to have a control function that would be as extensive as the voices--a control panel I could set up by the keyboard, probably with something like 20-30 pots and a similar number of switches. Something like the control available on the M-Audio keystation Pro keyboard. But the engineer I was working with (Ed Rudnick) came to the conclusion that we were pushing the technology to the edge of reliability already and that adding more wire runs and connectors was probably going to put it over the edge. So that was a little more limited than my original idea. "


Gleeson sold the E-mu modular, blue box and the two Prophet 10's to Casey Young in 1980. Casey in turn kept the Bluebox (which he continued to use throughout the '80s) but sold the E-mu modular and Prophet's (that never worked that well) to a guy in Portland, Oregon.

cheers,
Mikael
solitaryzen
I also love his work with Herbie Hancock, but my favourite work of his is on Julian Priester's Love Love album. Also nice stuff on Eddie Henderson's early albums.
JohnLRice
A couple EMU modular threads popped up recently so I was searching around to see if Mr. Gleeson's two excellent albums that used the EMU modular have made it to CD yet but unfortunately no. waah cry In searching though I noticed both albums are up on YouTube at the moment so, treat yourselves and give them a listen? w00t we're not worthy nanners

Beyond the Stars


Rainbow Delta


Also I noticed these videos I hadn't seen before:

Synth Pioneer Dr. Patrick Gleeson performing his latest composition on The Jake Feinberg Show


ARP 2600 Synthesizer Award Show w/ Dr Pat Gleeson & Jim Heintz NAMM TEC Awards 2015
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