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WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

i got on stage and forgot what to do...
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Play Out! Performance Modulars  
Author i got on stage and forgot what to do...
XidZeta
i just played an hour and fifteen minutes at the hip local music spot (smaller city, so yeah, the spot for music) I got on stage and forgot what to do, luckily i use ableton for drum machines and pads, and i have a couple synth racks loaded up too, with the modular running through for FX.

if i wouldnt have had some pre made clips, i would have FAILED MISERABLY

I eventually got things under control and continued with an improv set. All feedback was positive, but seriously, i got on stage and forgot everything i know...

Does this happen to you?

please tell me about it so i feel better
jenamu6
Never happened to me, like you describe it.

I do make mistakes or forget about certain things. Like for instance, I make this patch that I can change drastically in several ways.
I can use the sequencer, my pressure points, my wogglebug and switches to change the patch into something totally different......so I build in all these different ways to change things.......and i forget to use half of them.

Most of the time, the audience doesn't notice.
theabsent
Nope, not that kind.

Once on stage, in the middle of the gig, I found out that half of my sequencer files were corrupted. I still remember it very very clearly. It was my intention to play 8 arrangements/songs/tracks/what ever you want to call those noisy installations. I did the sound check with 4 tracks. Those were exactly the tracks that did work!

Next week the seq was sold.
akrylik
That happened to me once in high school for a prepared speech/debate. I got up there and completely forgot what I was suppose to say. I know why it happened though. Its because I tried to memorize the material to quickly. Mix in a little nervousness and you have the perfect mind storm.

The cure is to practice. Practice so much that your hands and ears bleed.

MY ASS IS BLEEDING
richard
I always forget what I'm supposed to do.

I call it improvisation.
jenamu6
richard wrote:
I always forget what I'm supposed to do.

I call it improvisation.


And that!!!
slow_riot
my first modular gig i drew a blank... everything was going wrong, couldn't get anything in tune, didn't have the right cables blah blah blah.

shit holes.
thesubtleknights666
I'm a harsh noise guy so I never know what I'm doing lol
Just me
I spend a bunch of time practicing with my live rig the set I'm gonna play. I still have some notes on a page to remind me of changes. I still make a few mistakes per show and forget to do any number of things during a performance. If you screw up, don't act like you notice and then do it again. The audience will think it is what you meant to do. Never completely lost it. Never use canned sequences. ( no computers in my setup, they are too flaky to trust to a permormance to me.)
Arturo00
I didn't so much forget what to do, but my very first modular set back in May started off extremely rough. There was a loud hum coming from the sound system. Some sort of grounding issue. Not sure.

All I know is that you could barely hear the music. It took about 10 minutes to fix the problem...and what a grueling 10 minutes that was. Luckily I was playing an "experimental" electronic music event, so people accepted the hum as part of my sound hihi

Just me
I agree. Right before I do a modular set, I take all the gear I'm going to use out of my studio and set it up on my kitchen table exactly as it'll be setup on stage. That way I know exactly what cables I'll need, and what levels to put everything at. I like to avoid suprises at all cost!

Doing this helped me avoid major disaster. I discovered that 1/4" mono to 1/8" stereo cables DO NOT work in Euro-land unless you pull the 1/8" jack slightly out. Which is flakey at best...
Navs
jenamu6 wrote:
... I make this patch that I can change drastically in several ways...so I build in all these different ways to change things.......and i forget to use half of them.


Yep, do that all the time hihi But the beauty of playing live is that 'mistakes' take you in different directions. And when you do pull it off, or it's better than you planned, it's SlayerBadger!
falafelbiels
I start with no patch and half a plan, not much can go wrong..
Hi5
thesubtleknights666 wrote:
I'm a harsh noise guy so I never know what I'm doing lol


So true.
Hi5
richard wrote:
I always forget what I'm supposed to do.

I call it improvisation.


I would say that with free improvisation there is no forgetting since there was never anything to start with.

Getting lost, however, is much more common.
loydb
I'm a master at forgetting arrangements on stage. "Shit, there's another chorus here?"

This is much less of a problem now that I don't play in public. smile
roqeja
did a show where the mixing booth guy switched off the stage monitors and our drum machine died. We didn't know if the rest of our rig had gone dead or not, since we couldn't hear a thing, proceeded to do a free improv without hearing ourselves. Apparently we did ok.

Improvisation is not a problem, deaf improvisation is a true challenge!
traveler
Once I played in this jazz group and the bass player had to start us off and he forgot the bassline to the tune. He just started playing something that didn't even remotely resemble what he was supposed to be playing so I had to jump in and play the bassline on piano to get him back on track. Phew, thank god that worked.

It is difficult though, when you have to perform with all this equipment as opposed to playing just one instrument. You have so much more to deal with depending on what your setup is. If you're sequencing on a computer, along with modular, drum machine, etc. It can get tedious and maybe hard to remember what you're supposed to do, but if you forgot completely what to do I would just call that 'stage fright'. This is probably something you will eventually get over the more you perform live. It was probably just your nerves telling you "I'm not ready for this!"

As far as improvisation goes I've learned that for it to be effective you must learn how to master the equipment/instrument you're using. Especially with 'free improvisation'. Ornette Coleman got to the point of being able to play free not by just playing whatever he wanted to, but by learning the whole structure of jazz and mastering his instrument first. This is key IMO. I don't think just playing free music holds any weight if you don't know how your modular works or how to play keyboard etc. You must first be rooted in something as a starting point be it the culture of jazz, classical, noise, or whatever genre most resonates with you, or at least understand how music is constructed. That should be a springing off point into the exploration of improvising.
strettara
tobiaschib wrote:
As far as improvisation goes I've learned that for it to be effective you must learn how to master the equipment/instrument you're using. Especially with 'free improvisation'. Ornette Coleman got to the point of being able to play free not by just playing whatever he wanted to, but by learning the whole structure of jazz and mastering his instrument first. This is key IMO. I don't think just playing free music holds any weight if you don't know how your modular works or how to play keyboard etc. You must first be rooted in something as a starting point be it the culture of jazz, classical, noise, or whatever genre most resonates with you, or at least understand how music is constructed. That should be a springing off point into the exploration of improvising.


I agree, although many wouldn't. But then I'm old and wise in the ways of the world...
shortsleeves
In my case it was not as much "forgot what to do", but rather "forgot to check something", and then had to adjust accordingly during performance.

I was about to play my first modular gig. It involved my 9U and a karimba. I had a contact microphone attached to the karimba. The soundcheck went surprisingly well (and easy to boot), and when I was putting away my karimba, the microphone got somehow disconnected, and fell on the floor. Nothing was broken though, so I attached the microphone again, and waited for my turn to play.

When I started playing, I realized the notes from the upper tier of my karimba are almost inaudible, so I was quite restricted with hte things I was able to play (well, at least for the people to hear), hence even more repetitiveness in my playing than I had planned.

If you care, for more on that performance and link to a SoundCloud file with the recording – visit this thread: https://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=81850
Volt Hugger
I have stepped up to the microphone and forgotten the first line of lyrics at a show. I think I either repeated a verse I could remember, or stuck the lyrics to the first verse at the end. A lot of pulling it off seems to be attitude. If you can laugh it off and finish the song tightly usually no one notices. People go to live gigs to see you fly by the seat of your pants. If you've practiced the stuff and aren't sloppy then small mistakes are an acceptable part of playing out.

Also, if you make a mistake, don't apologize at the end of the song. Anybody who noticed the screw up already knows, and if someone didn't notice it then there is no need to announce it over the PA.
mckenic
Never but then Im usually half drunk!

I once looked down and found myself playing the wrong string on my Bass or when I break a string - I have to mentally transpose while playing - not a strong point for me!

On the other hand - I had my 1st PhD review panel with my supervisor and external examiner before Christmas. I was only 3 months in to it so they admitted it was kinda unfair but this was to decide if I could continue my research. Keep in mind I did 4 years of undergrad and 2 years of masters to get here... and I fucking forgot EVERYTHING.

Forgot what my research was, forgot where I was, my paper title almost my name and just kept talking... I could hear myself talking inside my head and I was like "Dave - what the fuck are you on about? Stop!" But I didn't!

Never felt smaller or more ashamed in my entire life - took me months to mentally get over it - but - it aint gonna happen again! Ive done the worst thing I could do and no-one died and I'm still studying Mr. Green

Fuck it!

Its only a fuck-up if there is no lesson learned!
wsy
Just me wrote:
I spend a bunch of time practicing with my live rig the set I'm gonna play. I still have some notes on a page to remind me of changes. I still make a few mistakes per show and forget to do any number of things during a performance. If you screw up, don't act like you notice and then do it again. The audience will think it is what you meant to do. Never completely lost it. Never use canned sequences. ( no computers in my setup, they are too flaky to trust to a permormance to me.)


Seconded.

If you screw up, wait till it comes 'round again on the guitar and do it again, with
embellishments!

This really works. Damned if I understand why.

- Bill
ws9848
an hour and 15 minutes? that's a really long time!

I still use note and sometimes they don't make any sense sometimes they do. then after a show is when I remember all the stuff I was going to do...
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