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WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

Here's my review/thoughts on IDOW: Hardcore Edition
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> I Dream Of Wires Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9  Next [all]
Author Here's my review/thoughts on IDOW: Hardcore Edition
joesilence
in the midst of my 7th viewing.
still loving it.

also compelling me to go make music in between. hyper
KnobHell
joesilence wrote:
in the midst of my 7th viewing.
still loving it.

also compelling me to go make music in between. hyper


The only way I'm going to keep up is too install a flat screen in the John!
XXXEsq
I watched it from end to end in one sitting. Spectacular! Well done sirs! thumbs up applause
joesilence
KnobHell wrote:
joesilence wrote:
in the midst of my 7th viewing.
still loving it.

also compelling me to go make music in between. hyper


The only way I'm going to keep up is too install a flat screen in the John!


i'll relent and go spend some time with my gear. Rockin' Banana!
jjclark
I just finished watching it, and I would like to congratulate Jason and Robert on a job well done.

Could it (should it) have included more and different people? Of course, and it would have been 20 hours long. I look at it like any documentary as one particular take on the subject. Somebody else is free to make their own documentary; this is Jason's and Robert's and they did what they could in the constraints they worked under.

The result was wonderful from my perspective as a life-long synth geek, especially the second half. If my father was still alive I would show him this video and say "THIS!!! - this is why I was always dragging you out to the Heathkit store when I was a kid, and tortured you with out of tune squeaks and squeals while you were trying to get some sleep before your night shift".

I thought the second half of the film captured clearly the excitement and motivation of people who are really into synths. I recognized a bit of myself in a lot of the people interviewed (and all of myself in one person :-). I think I can safely say that most builders and DIY types have found themselves at one time or another scavenging through electronics part stores (won't call them junk yards) like Lori Napoleon and Danjel Van Tijn in the movie. I just love scrounging through places like that.

Particular highlights for me were the interviews with Dieter Doepfer and Danjel van Tijn (although I already Dan quite well). Andreas Schneider's interview was great, and I found it interesting to see the "colorful" neighborhood of his store.

In closing must also add that I really liked Navs' narration. I didn't realize it was him til I read this thread. Great timing and diction and a lovely accent. Kind of reminded me of listening to recordings of Alan Watts.
defenestration
the story about the girl making the switchboard modular I found fairly engaging, captured and distilled a lot of the passion

andreas schneider is definitely a very memorable modular philosopher

I didn't enjoy the 'BBC' approach very much. My girlfriend commented that this gave the presentation more gravitas and would help casual audiences take the subject more seriously. I can't disagree but for some reason I found it jarring.

Whenever the narration 'philosophized' or the cinematography got a bit too 'artistic' it just bugged me - I wanted a tighter focus on the people and how all these resonating ideas and their experiences grappling with fundamental issues of meaning and agency develop the ways they feel and think. At first I felt like the editorial decisions didn't 'get it' but now I'm starting to think the director may actually be experiencing a form of expert blindness due to his proximity to the subject matter.

For myself the 'solvent storyline' is not successful partly because Jason Amm lacks the charisma to make me care about his 'modular journey'. Also the most relevant parts of it from a practical perspective were totally left out - nothing on the basic design philosophies of assembling small modular which might dictate module choice (replicate a monosynth, generative patches, etc.) or any details about the system Jason actually ended up putting together, and more specifically, why he made the choices that he did.

Did anyone else feel the overwhelming urge to go outside, get some sun, and talk to some pretty girls after they finished watching? hihi
joesilence
defenestration wrote:
Did anyone else feel the overwhelming urge to go outside, get some sun, and talk to some pretty girls after they finished watching? hihi


well, in my case my wife (pretty girl) came home from work for lunch at the end of one particular viewing.
...with Korean food, too (bonus).
i got some sun a few hours later when i picked up our kids from school. thumbs up
noobyscooby
thumbs up It's motherfucking bacon yo
subcon
constructively thinking. It would have been nice to have discussed the various manners one uses various synths and setups.
IE, after 4 hours of IDOW: have a nooby explain how to hook up a basic patch on a modular that is playable. (ex OSC/EG/VCA/MIXER)
Of my friends, they still didn't know how.
The whole concept of CV isn;t really approached, to learn and be creative.
IE, the approach to most modulars is not the same. You really don;t play a System 700 the same way you do a Synthi 100 or Buchla 200.
So I think the basic architecture could have been discussed more for educational benefit.
just my 2 cents.
( I remember calling Rex Probe at Serge after building my first panel in 93 and asked him how to approach it, and he did say well thats half the fun, but it did take a while to learn the system. The same with my Arp 2500 took a few months before I was even able to understand its ways. ) smile jah
Navs
Congratulations to Jason and Robert!

I'm very happy and grateful I got to voice a film on a subject that is close to my heart, despite having to say Mogue and Boo-klaw wink
stromcat
I watched it all through, and want to congratulate the team on their efforts as a tiny two-person operation, it's a wicked achievement and a solid doc.

4 hours straight is a long time to watch anything I think, I broke the viewing up over two evenings. There's a lot of great insight, some of the real vibe of the format - I particularly enjoyed Lori's quest, seeing Dewanatron and the insights into Intellijel's manufacturing process.

I think defenestration has nailed how I felt about it too, I felt that Jason's modular quest was maybe a bit undercooked, we never saw his system and I felt like we didn't really got to the heart of that story. I loved his initial challenge to the productivity/pitfalls of the modular format, the harsh reality that Bruce/Modcan's music making ended when he bought the modular, but didn't feel there was any equally significant resolution to that...it was just Jason wandering around looking at some modulars and saying "I'm going to get one". I would have loved to see a more practical focus on peoples systems themselves too, but appreciate that may be beyond the remit of even a 4 hour doc, and isn't perhaps interesting to a viewer that doesn't actually own a modular.

I would be interested in watching the 'theatrical cut', even my engagement was waning a little 3/4 of the way through part two, and it could be that a tighter, shorter version could concentrate all the most engaging parts of what's there.

This isn't very helpful now that it's done but I have to say I found the voiceover a bit severe in tone. Navs did really great work - it really is a seriously professional and consistent voiceover, but stylistically I never felt it quite gelled with the quirky subject matter. I kept imaging that a west coast american accent, something a bit more relaxed and groovier, would perhaps be a warmer, friendlier fit.

Again congrats to the team for producing such a solid piece of work!
dan_p
Good job, really enjoyable viewing.

Thought you got it all spot on.
suitandtieguy
we posted our review to Twitter as a series of tweets under the hashtag #IDOWtruth if anyone cares to read them.
Pfurmel
Really enjoyed this. I preferred the first half which oddly before viewing, thought I would have felt the opposite.
It seemed for the most part, unbiased and it attempted to base everything on facts(I don't know the entire history of modular so can't say everything was correct).

The second half was good but there were some areas that could have been improved on. Some of the audio was difficult to hear on interviews. It seemed to meander a bit a times. Perhaps it would work better if it was simply a whats what of the happenings in the modern scene as it stands today, without being one mans journey into eurorack.


I would have loved to see more of the DIY legends but I think that is going to be covered elsewhere.

But overall, great work and I am delighted to see something like this come about.
Pfurmel
suitandtieguy wrote:
we posted our review to Twitter as a series of tweets under the hashtag #IDOWtruth if anyone cares to read them.


Really enjoyed those tweets, thanks.
Smokey
I'm a documentary nut and I devour any doc that I think might be interesting. Music documentaries are by far my favorite. I do not own a modular synth but like Jason, have been using old analog synths and drum machines for making my music. My interest in the doc was more for it being a synth doc instead of a modular doc. After seeing it, I really want a Buchla.

Part one was really well done. The narration suited it and I loved seeing all the old synths and collections. I really wish this portion was longer. I could have done without the weird synth graphics too, they just came off a little silly. I'm not sure how much was left on the cutting room floor, but part one really deserves to be a multi-part series, similar to the Ken Burns Jazz series.

Part two was good as well but could have been the bonus features of an extended part one. I enjoyed seeing the designers talk about their work. No longer are these brands nameless manufacturers to me but now I have faces and personalities to associate with the products. Seeing the Dewanatron cousins and the patch-board synth lady was a fun delve into the sound art aspect of the synth community. Solvent's story could have been left out of part two. It didn't really add much. I would have just let the talking heads talk longer...

All in all this was an excellent documentary that will be sure to set the synth-doc standard for years (decades?) to come.

Now that they have reissued the "limited edition" dvds. I really hope they offer the DVD-R box set of extended interviews that they had on their indiegogo page. I'd buy one.
hednoize
Smokey wrote:

Now that they have reissued the "limited edition" dvds. I really hope they offer the DVD-R box set of extended interviews that they had on their indiegogo page. I'd buy one.


As would I. Would happily pay the $200 original asking price.
Smokey
Some more thoughts...

The Electronic Sack Butt! So awesome!

Is the drunk elephant recording that is playing during the segment an old recording of the actual Sack Butt? Or is it an estimate of what it might have sounded like?
s o l v e n t
Smokey wrote:
Some more thoughts...

The Electronic Sack Butt! So awesome!

Is the drunk elephant recording that is playing during the segment an old recording of the actual Sack Butt? Or is it an estimate of what it might have sounded like?


It's an actual recording that we licensed, Hugh Le Caine's "The Sackbut Blues"
emdot_ambient
s o l v e n t wrote:
Smokey wrote:
Some more thoughts...

The Electronic Sack Butt! So awesome!

Is the drunk elephant recording that is playing during the segment an old recording of the actual Sack Butt? Or is it an estimate of what it might have sounded like?


It's an actual recording that we licensed, Hugh Le Caine's "The Sackbut Blues"


Excellent reading material:
The Sackbut Blues: Hugh Le Caine, Pioneer of Electronic Music

Required listening:
(Dripsody, the sound source is one drop of water, played on Hugh Le Caine's pre-Mellotron tape sampler...see pic below)



I was thrilled to see Le Caine mentioned at the very beginning of our journey through modular land. Mr. Green
Smokey
Thanks Solvent and emdot for educating me on Le Caine!

That tape sampler and dripsody recording look and sound amazing. There is just something magical about those old, esoteric machines... I'm very glad the documentary delved into the history a bit deeper than others I've seen.
Tenderlash
I just bought the DVD last weekend and I'm almost through watching it (will finish the last half hour tonight - I'm slow because I'm still watching Breaking Bad lol.. priorities lol) as someone relatively new to modulars, this has been a real eye opener. I have so, so much to learn. Also, I was pleased to see a few faces of people I met last weekend in Asheville and a few faces of people I "met" through facebook smile I have to credit the movie for helping me find this forum. I am quite intrigued by all the new gear out there as well as the vintage gear that's still floating around and being pampered. I can't wait to learn more about modular synths... I had to cringe through the DX7 part talking about the downfall of analog.. as I recently bought a DX7 on a whim (well.. when I was a teenager this was THE synth, so I just wanted one!) This documentary is very well done, well narrated and really just an amazing collection of thoughts and anecdotes from so many pioneers. thumbs up applause
thesnow
Tenderlash wrote:
I just bought the DVD last weekend and I'm almost through watching it (will finish the last half hour tonight - I'm slow because I'm still watching Breaking Bad lol.. priorities lol) as someone relatively new to modulars, this has been a real eye opener. I have so, so much to learn. Also, I was pleased to see a few faces of people I met last weekend in Asheville and a few faces of people I "met" through facebook smile I have to credit the movie for helping me find this forum. I am quite intrigued by all the new gear out there as well as the vintage gear that's still floating around and being pampered. I can't wait to learn more about modular synths... I had to cringe through the DX7 part talking about the downfall of analog.. as I recently bought a DX7 on a whim (well.. when I was a teenager this was THE synth, so I just wanted one!) This documentary is very well done, well narrated and really just an amazing collection of thoughts and anecdotes from so many pioneers. thumbs up applause


dx7 is still a bad ass sounding synth and it did "change the game" at one point so, it's a keeper! thumbs up
s o l v e n t
thesnow wrote:
Tenderlash wrote:
I just bought the DVD last weekend and I'm almost through watching it (will finish the last half hour tonight - I'm slow because I'm still watching Breaking Bad lol.. priorities lol) as someone relatively new to modulars, this has been a real eye opener. I have so, so much to learn. Also, I was pleased to see a few faces of people I met last weekend in Asheville and a few faces of people I "met" through facebook smile I have to credit the movie for helping me find this forum. I am quite intrigued by all the new gear out there as well as the vintage gear that's still floating around and being pampered. I can't wait to learn more about modular synths... I had to cringe through the DX7 part talking about the downfall of analog.. as I recently bought a DX7 on a whim (well.. when I was a teenager this was THE synth, so I just wanted one!) This documentary is very well done, well narrated and really just an amazing collection of thoughts and anecdotes from so many pioneers. thumbs up applause


dx7 is still a bad ass sounding synth and it did "change the game" at one point so, it's a keeper! thumbs up


Really encouraging to hear this, Tenderlash - cool!

Despite the DX7's role in killing off analog when it came out, that doesn't take away from it as a powerful and interesting synth nowadays, if that's a sound you like. I can tell you that IDOW's director Robert purchased a DX7 in order to shoot it for the film, and he's kept it and I know he is quite into it now!
andrewF
Watched the HC edition on the weekend in one sitting
1st half was very enjoyable - well put together and some great vintage footage.
2nd half; it was great to see & hear people that I have only ever communicated with on forums or by email. Probably need to re-watch it as we started to drift off and play with synths and discuss our own synths ....... guess it was only natural.

To sum up: a fucking great doco! Very impressive.
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