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WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

Here's my review/thoughts on IDOW: Hardcore Edition
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> I Dream Of Wires Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 [all]
Author Here's my review/thoughts on IDOW: Hardcore Edition
mousegarden
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
Rotterdam Rebel wrote:
I am very strongly convinced this whole modular/synth thing is going be huge the next coming years.

Where can I invest?


You can always invest in me ? I'm the worlds most successful failure.....

Dead Banana

MouseGarden.
jwfleck
I am about to get back into modular synths after being VERY into them in the 2000-2003 area (Doepfer, Synthesizers.com & MOTM)

I am amazed and delighted that a documentary on this subject exists at all, so I feel somewhat feeble criticizing it too much.

I assume for budgetary/legal reasons no (archival) interview clips with Bob Moog were included. Wendy Carlos would also have been nice. Was Don Buchla already in pretty bad health during production? I assume licensing the rights to existing interview clips with any of these folks might have added up to too much $$$.

Subtitles would be nice.

But hell, I really enjoyed it and if I wasn't already enthused about the current state of modular synthesis, this documentary pushed me well over the edge. I guess I will have to keep playing with AnalogKit on the iPad until I get the money together to start building a new system. (Going to keep it all Eurorack this time around.)

Cheers!
jordanb
Great movie! Loved the live rigs setups of NIN thumbs up
jb001
Brilliant doccy
oberdada
It's been some months since I watched it, so the details are not clear in my recollection. But in general, my impression is that this is a highly flawed documentary.

A good documentary should tell a story and ask critical questions. This one is more like an extended sales pitch. I think Serge would have deserved more coverage. There could have been more focus on the music made with modular, its possibilities as well as its limitations. They could have compared it more extensively with modular software.

What I'd really be interested in is a documentary that would look into the economic side of modulars, or a sociological / anthropological perspective on what drives more and more of us into modular.
mousegarden
oberdada wrote:
It's been some months since I watched it, so the details are not clear in my recollection. But in general, my impression is that this is a highly flawed documentary.

A good documentary should tell a story and ask critical questions. This one is more like an extended sales pitch. I think Serge would have deserved more coverage. There could have been more focus on the music made with modular, its possibilities as well as its limitations. They could have compared it more extensively with modular software.

What I'd really be interested in is a documentary that would look into the economic side of modulars, or a sociological / anthropological perspective on what drives more and more of us into modular.


It was entertaining, I think a social/anthropological doc would be a totally different brief.
One thing I didn't like about it was how some people were portrayed, it was very partisan, either for or against, and we all know that those folks are in reality probably very liberal, and some people, I got the impression, were treated a bit like circus freaks.
oberdada
Spot on, mousegarden! I'll have to remind myself, if I ever watch it again, that those figures that come across as freaks are real people with good and bad sides as everyone else.

Another reason I was not very impressed by it is that almost none of my musical heros were interviewed (and most of them are not famous for working on modulars anyway), possiblly with the exception of Subotnick.
s o l v e n t
mousegarden wrote:

One thing I didn't like about it was how some people were portrayed, it was very partisan, either for or against, and we all know that those folks are in reality probably very liberal, and some people, I got the impression, were treated a bit like circus freaks.


We certainly had no agenda to portray anyone in any unfavourable light. I'd be very curious to hear some specific examples from you that illustrate this.
cftbl
Personally, I thought the various people interviewed came across as themselves. In every case where I've see other interviews of these folks, they've come across very much the same as here.
addendum
Speaking of "light" in the literal sense, I felt that the lighting on Trent & Ali looked much more professional and balanced than on most other interviewees. Did they have it done by some of their own associates (Rob etc) instead of your crew, or what?

Anyway, hope you can take this as constructive feedback - personally I didn't like to see people's facial skin really up close and detailed down to the pores in that reddish/ pinkish glaring lighting. Made them look overexposed (in the metaphorical way - not sure if that's also the technical issue behind what I felt) and hence, not as "cool" as Trent & Ali.

Maybe THAT's even why some viewers felt that the portrayal was uneven? You know, many casual viewers tend to go by the whole of an impression left on them, not analyzing what elements made them feel which way.

(Also, one of the interviewees, whom I won't name here, also has a way of more or less subtly, more or less humorously belittling people next to him. Saw the same thing in other videos of him. That's not a filmmaker's fault, and those other guys seem happy to play along, BUT: the filmmakers can still influence how much of that is emphasized on film - by the position of either guy in the frame, by the cutting rhythm and so on.)


s o l v e n t wrote:
mousegarden wrote:

One thing I didn't like about it was how some people were portrayed, it was very partisan, either for or against, and we all know that those folks are in reality probably very liberal, and some people, I got the impression, were treated a bit like circus freaks.


We certainly had no agenda to portray anyone in any unfavourable light. I'd be very curious to hear some specific examples from you that illustrate this.
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
addendum wrote:
Speaking of "light" in the literal sense, I felt that the lighting on Trent & Ali looked much more professional and balanced than on most other interviewees. Did they have it done by some of their own associates (Rob etc) instead of your crew, or what?


My interview was conducted between about 1 and 3 am in an empty television studio in Toronto. I had flown to Toronto that night and was going to drive to Peterborough, Ontario the next day because I had business in nearby Lakefield. I had been out of town when Robert and Jason were in Vancouver to interview Danjel, and they wanted to sit down with me, so this was the only opportunity to do it. I had been at work all day in Vancouver, then had a 5-hour red-eye flight. I was tired and disheveled and not completely coherent. They picked me up outside my hotel in a van and we went to the studio. It was like we were sneaking in. So yeah, probably not the most ideal of circumstances, but I had fun, and they got some entertaining footage and voice-overs.
mousegarden
s o l v e n t wrote:
mousegarden wrote:

One thing I didn't like about it was how some people were portrayed, it was very partisan, either for or against, and we all know that those folks are in reality probably very liberal, and some people, I got the impression, were treated a bit like circus freaks.


We certainly had no agenda to portray anyone in any unfavourable light. I'd be very curious to hear some specific examples from you that illustrate this.


I think you've either got to go for it or not, with a subject like this, it's a very tricky balance putting "the other side of the coin" I guess it becomes too unwieldy and lengthy if you stray too far away from the main focus.
I thought Trent Reznor said some valid things, but really did belittle Cortini IMO at some points, it made me cringe.
And the people that weren't really into modular I thought were just given a few sound bites, rather than a more probing interview as to their opinions.
Legowelt in particular.
addendum
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
So yeah, probably not the most ideal of circumstances, but I had fun, and they got some entertaining footage and voice-overs.


I'm not recalling your interview right now and my question to solvent wasn't about yours in particular. Nor did I even mention any interviewees' physical or mental state during filming... only the lighting.
wogglebug
Is there an on-demand version of the hardcore edition?

I found a link to the DVD/BluRay version at Synchrotek in a different thread, but it shows "Out of Stock".
s o l v e n t
wogglebug wrote:
Is there an on-demand version of the hardcore edition?

I found a link to the DVD/BluRay version at Synchrotek in a different thread, but it shows "Out of Stock".


No there isn't an On-Demand version and there likely won't be until or distro deals expire in approx 5 years.
g0lem
i just started rewatching... a lot of the statements in those interviews are the sort of stuff that i'd push back in a normal conversation.

This didn't age too well.

Concrete examples include Zen and Oaklander's dude is talking about how special this stuff is while just making a bunch of bleep sounds that aren't even remotely interesting. If you're going to talk about how a Virus is meh, then you better tell me why instead of treating me like a child. Then he goes on talk about having learned through "Trial and error", which is exactly what someone would say who hasn't thought deeply about intentionality and art.

There are too many masturbatory interviews. Some dude going "this moog is gorgeous!" is not worth the time to watch. "You get a lot of bang for the buck" is a statement that should be reserved for an advertisement. Not a documentary.

It is a sort of interesting period piece though. The complaint about modulars being something people get lost in and don't produce much from has been proven categorically false in the past few years.

There is so much good modular music being released by reputable labels (not that it matters); it looks like every show I go to features a modular synth at some point; and these aren't show that necessarily attract muffwiggler types.
s o l v e n t
addendum wrote:
Speaking of "light" in the literal sense, I felt that the lighting on Trent & Ali looked much more professional and balanced than on most other interviewees. Did they have it done by some of their own associates (Rob etc) instead of your crew, or what?

Anyway, hope you can take this as constructive feedback - personally I didn't like to see people's facial skin really up close and detailed down to the pores in that reddish/ pinkish glaring lighting. Made them look overexposed (in the metaphorical way - not sure if that's also the technical issue behind what I felt) and hence, not as "cool" as Trent & Ali.

Maybe THAT's even why some viewers felt that the portrayal was uneven? You know, many casual viewers tend to go by the whole of an impression left on them, not analyzing what elements made them feel which way.


No, it was the same crew (ie, our director Rob) who lighted this, and the rest of the interviews. The lighting situation in Trent's studio may have been more favourable, plus there was always changing situations as far as what kind of equipment - lighting included - that was at our disposal. Varied depending on what we could afford at the time, and also what we could manage to carry. Traveling through Europe for example, with just the 2 of us on trains etc, there was not a lot of lighting equipment that we could manage.

In the years since IDOW, a lot of the gear, and lighting in particular, has become a lot better and MUCH more portable, and you'll def notice an improvement in quality on our next docs ("Electronic Voyager" and "Subotnick" - both nearly ready to move into post-production).

I highly doubt that this is what people are referring to when they complain about unfavourable portrayals etc. IMO most of the critiques I read on forums about IDOW are akin to Dr Suess' "If I Ran the Zoo."
hamildad
g0lem wrote:
. The complaint about modulars being something people get lost in and don't produce much from has been proven categorically false in the past few years.


really?? I'd very much like to see where this has been categorically proved. perhaps at the grand council of Modular Musicians, which I was too busy to attend?

or did everyone get the email... hang on I'll just search my junk folder...
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