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WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

Here's my review/thoughts on IDOW: Hardcore Edition
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> I Dream Of Wires  
Author Here's my review/thoughts on IDOW: Hardcore Edition
s o l v e n t
Please post your review/thoughts of "IDOW: Hardcore Edition" in this thread, thanks!
337is
Unexpected swag in my envelope made me happy. Love the postcards, button, and stickers. Can't wait to watch this bad boy. I've been so excited about this release for so long, and now it's payoff time! Thanks Jason! applause thumbs up
s o l v e n t
bump
rezzn8r
Let me start by saying great doc! I really enjoyed watching it. It has lots of great shots of awe inspiring systems, and many insightful comments from some very interesting people. I really like the interview with Dieter.
I thought the first part was a very well constructed history of modular synthesis. The narration suited the content and the pace. It even reminding me at times of Look Around You.
Unfortunately, I have to say that I didn't think the narration suited the second part at all. I felt like the narration kept holding back the pace of the doc when it could be picking up momentum.
I also thought your (solvent's) narrative got a little lost in the second half of the second part, but I really should watch it again to make sure it wasn't just a bit of viewing fatigue, as I did watch it all in one sitting oops SlayerBadger!
Thanks for doing this. I'm sure I'll watch it many more times we're not worthy
humancertainty
Just finished Part 1.
nanners thumbs up we're not worthy
taylor12k
got mine today and have watched part 1 and some of part 2. very enjoyable and very well done.

I, too, find the narration in pt2. (haven't seen any of 3 or 4 yet) a bit dry. the "bbc" vibe works well for the historical first part, but it seems like a different, perhaps more energetic or "younger" voice may work better as it goes on. of course, changing narrators might be a bad idea, too.

anyway, minor point overall.

a fun and informative watch so far. love to see and hear people I've only ever read or read about.
Bath House
Surprised/bummed at no closed captions on the Blu-Ray. I've done these for a living and would have donated the service if I had known that the alternative was to just not have them.
s o l v e n t
Bath House wrote:
Surprised/bummed at no closed captions on the Blu-Ray. I've done these for a living and would have donated the service if I had known that the alternative was to just not have them.


Would've delayed the release of the DVD/BluRay substantially. We literally put it to press a couple of weeks after finishing it. It's a niche and limited edition film, and I just don't think there is enough demand for closed captions to justify it in this case. Same goes with subtitles. We'll get all of these things done for the theatrical release.
s o l v e n t
BTW the narrator is Navs of navsmodularlab.blogspot.ca / regular MW forum contributor ... not saying that should affect anyone's opinion of it, but a cool fact.
jmcecil
I enjoyed it but had some nitpicks.

Main complaint would be the "who is this guy talking" labels came on too late, with too little, and sometimes no info about who they were or why they mattered. I still have no clue who the 2 old dudes talking about their initial work with Buchla are.

The soundtrack largely ignores the current dialog. For example you show a picture of Keith Emerson ... no soaring keith emerson lead ... You talk about Wendy Carlos being pivotal, but not a single blip from that sound pallet. Same with references to Stevie Wonder, Herbie Handcock etc... You can use snippets for work like this, so it seems odd by omission.

Other than that it really was a fun walk through the initial modular world.
s o l v e n t
jmcecil wrote:
The soundtrack largely ignores the current dialog. For example you show a picture of Keith Emerson ... no soaring keith emerson lead ... You talk about Wendy Carlos being pivotal, but not a single blip from that sound pallet. Same with references to Stevie Wonder, Herbie Handcock etc... You can use snippets for work like this, so it seems odd by omission.


Ha we would've needed to sell another 3000 copies just to license the songs you mention here
jmcecil
s o l v e n t wrote:
jmcecil wrote:
The soundtrack largely ignores the current dialog. For example you show a picture of Keith Emerson ... no soaring keith emerson lead ... You talk about Wendy Carlos being pivotal, but not a single blip from that sound pallet. Same with references to Stevie Wonder, Herbie Handcock etc... You can use snippets for work like this, so it seems odd by omission.


Ha we would've needed to sell another 3000 copies just to license the songs you mention here

lol, at least here you can use snippets without license for stuff like this under "fair use". But, your legal budget probably couldn't handle the idiotic litigious assholes just to defend what should be obvious.

Anyhow, didn't want to seem over critical ... small nits compared to the good stuff that is there.
s o l v e n t
jmcecil wrote:
s o l v e n t wrote:
jmcecil wrote:
The soundtrack largely ignores the current dialog. For example you show a picture of Keith Emerson ... no soaring keith emerson lead ... You talk about Wendy Carlos being pivotal, but not a single blip from that sound pallet. Same with references to Stevie Wonder, Herbie Handcock etc... You can use snippets for work like this, so it seems odd by omission.


Ha we would've needed to sell another 3000 copies just to license the songs you mention here

lol, at least here you can use snippets without license for stuff like this under "fair use". But, your legal budget probably couldn't handle the idiotic litigious assholes just to defend what should be obvious.

Anyhow, didn't want to seem over critical ... small nits compared to the good stuff that is there.


Thanks. "Fair use" would only apply if a specific piece of music was mentioned by name. None that you mentioned were. Mentioning an album doesn't give fair use to songs contained in it. Anyway you would only get 3 seconds (or something like that) of use. BTW, Wendy Carlos now owns the rights to her music, which seems to mean that you won't likely be hearing any Carlos music licensed to anything.
s o l v e n t
BTW I'm going to step out of this thread as I don't want to get into addressing points about how & why the film was made the way it was. I just don't have time for it. Not that anyone asked me to step in, of course! But I'm just saying it's best that the thread be people sharing their thoughts with each other about the film instead of offering critique to the people who made it. Cheers!
drip.feed
Anybody received it in UK / Ireland / Europe yet? Meine Bierkeller ist voll. Guinness ftw!
Bath House
Just finishing it now. applause Thumbs up across the board, great camerawork, hyper-clean DSLR-feeling footage throughout without lame or distracting effects or transitions, which people making "tech" documentaries are too often drawn to. It's like looking through nice, clean glass at the content, as something like this should be.

I love how dry and academic the voiceover is - it feels like a nice, wink-wink nudge-nudge reference to all of those PBS or BBC doc like "Made in Sheffield," instead of having some charismatic, contemporary morning zoo-sounding dudebro. Engaging, clean diction - thumbs up. I was surprised at how noisy and not-great quality some of the regular interview audio was - lots of room sound, obvious edits - especially compared to how super-clean other interview audio is (the Carl Craig and Chris Carter stuff sounds amazing!). As noted earlier, I was also bummed at the lack of subtitles, especially given some thick accents and sub-par interview audio. Definitely prioritize that for the feature edition - and if you want someone that's done it professionally and knows how to spell every single "Trautonium," "Schulze," etc. - PM me!

Similar to another poster, I found the attributions kind of confusing and sometimes hilarious - I'd definitely focus on fixing some of those for the mainstream release. For example, I wouldn't dream of listing Flood's primary affiliation as "Node" - instead, I'd credit him as "Producer - Depeche Mode, Smashing Pumpkins, U2" or something like that that a mainstream audience will understand. There were several others like this that I can't remember at the moment, where the person's most obscure or most recent affiliation was listed under their name instead of their most obvious one.

Loved it, loved it. Wish it was a miniseries with each little chunk lasting 2 hours.
radams
The soundtrack is very good
Deserves it's own release
StepLogik
Got my hardcore edition w00t

Great soundtrack! Informative and entertaining. Lots of GAS-inducing footage.
iamgoldman
sat down and watched through the whole thing. seriously inspiring.

i especially loved how the documentary followed lori napoleon and her diy switchboard endeavors. just a great way to show that connecting with others is just as valuable as synth know-how.

this is masterful work, and i hope to support another project of yours!
taylor12k
done with part 2 now and really enjoying it. i'm really impressed by a lot of the minds behind eurorack.. dieter doepfer and danjel come across as particularly perceptive people... (as do many others, but these two pop into my head).

so much has been covered in the first two hours, i can't imagine what's left! but i know it'll continue to be deep and inspiring.
Kingnimrod
I'm just partway into it, but I really like the voiceover. At first I had the volume too low and thought they had run the script through xtranormal. Ha!

Subtitles/CC would have been excellent but 4 hours would have been quite a task.

If you're looking to clean up ambient noise from interview footage for the theatrical cut, there are tools available that make it very easy that sample a bit between dialog and filter those frequencies out of the audio.

Overall, this doc feels very solid and professionally done. Get ready for the flood of newcomers to this forum if it ever hits Netflix.
Tubeampguy
I REALLY wanted the extended interviews with all the artists. Kinda weird that the interviews are all posted online, But NOT included in the Hardcore version. After watching it 3 times in 2 days I'm bummed of this omission. sad banana
Kingnimrod
Yeah, I'm only partway into the doc, so I didn't know that it didn't include those, as the initial description described "bonus extended interviews" as part of it. I guess that is what will be on the DVD-r sets that were super-limited?

Hopefully they will post all of the extended interviews to Vimeo once they've made all of the money they can from it.
acidbob
my only complaint is that I havent seen it yet!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! damn hihi need it now...
n_m
Kingnimrod wrote:


Hopefully they will post all of the extended interviews to Vimeo once they've made all of the money they can from it.


Second that!
legionhwp
I originally posted this on a thread in the Buchla section (here: https://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=91141) before I knew this sub forum was here. Since they moved that thread I've discovered all these posts so I'll move my post here as well.

-------

Binged watched the entire IDOW HE last night. Quick first impressions:

It's broken down into two documentaries Part one is mostly a history of modular synths, Part 2 is the kind of about the "Re-emergence and Rebirth" of modulars in modern times.

I thought part one was riveting. Really really well done and I could see where this might even appeal to curious but non-synth geeks.

Part Two was more interviews and stories following two people in particular in their quest to learn and, in one case, build a DIY modular. I thought this was not quite as interesting as the first part and tended to jump around a bit more but it was still filled with fantastic interviews and information. The interview with Schneider making an analogy that describes the differences between the old school modular heads and the new wave is worth the admission price alone.

One thing that kind of struck me funny was the story of Solvent who basically starts out feeling modulars are serious wastes of time. He eventually gets to meet Vince Clark in his home studio and has a handful of other dream synth dates and then is handed a commission to make the soundtrack CD for this movie using modulars given to him for a week (including a vintage Moog System 15). He remains a bit skeptical throughout but apparently grows to see the benefit of these machines.

Perhaps it was the fact this is the long form version and not as edited but I couldn't help but think at times there would be more grateful players who have dedicated their time and passion to these machines who would perhaps have deserved and done more with some of those opportunities. I liked how the film did present a lot of sides (including some of the negative aspects of modular and vintage Luv) but I feel the HE version at least kind of gets lost in what it's trying to say by putting everything in and choosing his story to tell.

EDIT:
-------
I understand Solvent was one of the creators and writer of this film. As such it makes sense he'd be filming his journey. I'm still a bit puzzled over the mixed signals of interest yet almost disdain for modulars from him at times. Even the ending had some confusion as he completed the CD he was making but still seemed dissapointed with the Moog modular and some of the gear. fair enough, one can pick and choose tools rationally but for the narrative I didn't get a clear picture what the end of his journey (and possibly the purpose of this part of the film) was.
--------

The other story is of a young woman in NY who falls in love with an old telephone console with it's patch cords and sets out to build a DIY modular system. I thought this captured a lot of the passion and wonderment a newbie and fan feels (perhaps even some of the obsession, she admits she now lives with this machine as a part of her life and looks forward to seeing it after work). This journey is not entirely about modulars as well but captures a lot of the enthusiasm surrounding the idea and tactile/fetish nature. It does seem to meander a bit but almost all the detail is interesting to us geeks (and, well, this IS the HE edition). I almost imagine her story alone could be a complete film so putting that in the second part with all the rest of the interviews, ideas, etc. is cool but does make the "story" jump around a bit.

These are minor quibbles however as it's clear this version is more of a "kitchen sink" type release. I like what the filmmakers were doing with these narratives and appreciate the idea of making something that any viewer can appreciate. I look forward to seeing how all this footage is used in the final version and seeing where they go with it.

The DVD came with a nice letter from the IDOW folks which explained clearly the hardcore Edition is NOT the movie that will be made and eventually shown at festivals/given a theatrical or general DVD release. That will be an edited version so I imagine it will be slimmed down and flow much better than the Part Two as it exists now (something that will make it better for general release). It also asked that anyone commenting or reviewing it refer to this version (the 4 hour Hardcore DVD) as IDOW HE and not "I Dream of Wires" which will presumably be the name of the final movie. It's not clear if the final film with combine parts One and Two but given the great exposition in Part One I certainly hope a lot of that makes it into the actual film.

The DVD package came with a button and some high quality full color synth porn post cards and stickers. Guitarists usually call those items "case candy" and they were kind of cute.

I have to say this is really a pretty amazing product. It's obvious the film makers took the time to make the footage and editing top notch. I was very impressed by the quality of the film and the use of found footage with their new interviews, etc (especially in Part One) is quite professional. This isn't a DIY youtube doc, it's a high quality labor of love. The IDOW HE is certainly for the hard core geeks but well worth it both as a product and as an opportunity to fund and help get this project completed.

Finally super special props to Mr. MuFFwiggler who is mentioned and featured (there is an interesting section on MW and the "community" of modulars as well!)

Bleep on!
BillyR
My only question was how there was little to no reference to Eno? He played an EMS Synthi in Roxy Music, the film talked about EMS quite a bit, but there was barely a name drop of Eno? I know this film was to be more about the synths and culture, but thought for sure there'd be a nod to Eno in some way. hmmm.....

But all in all I'm loving the film. Great work!!!! Was VERY happily surprised to see you got Legowelt in there. Just recently got back into his stuff again this past week. thumbs up
s o l v e n t
I said I wasn't going to respond here but just felt compelled to offer a response to legionhwp, in response to the "Solvent story", with Solvent being me!

As you've noted I am more than an on-screen subject, and while Robert is the film's director, I was heavily involved in many stages of the process and had a heavy hand in working with Robert on the vision and direction of the film. It was me who chose most of the people we interviewed for example, and I conducted approx 75% of the interviews. Hence "A film by Robert Fantinatto and Jason Amm".

When I met Robert about 4 years ago, he came to my house as a new fan of my music, to buy some of my CDs. He told me that he just got a Dotcom system after decades of being out of the "synth world". I've been a heavy-duty analog synth obsessive for 20+ years. I told him that I purposefully avoided modulars, for the reasons that I get into in the film: my feeling that they led to more tinkering than music making, the fact that in the kind of music I was into making (largely electro and synth pop) I could get by just fine with hardwired analogs, and most notably my fear of becoming obsessed/addicted.

Shortly after he started the film, we met again and by that time I was getting very very tempted to get into eurorack. I started giving him leads on people to talk to and it snowballed to where we decided I should become officially involved as the film's Producer. Rob was really into the idea of me being like an on screen host, where the film would be centered around my journey of discovering the world of modulars. I wasn't into the idea of being a host, but as we were going along it became clear to us that it would be worthwhile to use me as a prominent storyline, at least.

So that's what my story is meant to be - the story of an electronic musician, who was skeptical/resistant about modulars, having his mind changed and diving in.

Which leads to my response of this:

"I couldn't help but think at times there would be more grateful players who have dedicated their time and passion to these machines who would perhaps have deserved and done more with some of those opportunities...."

Perhaps the idea wasn't realized as successfully as possible (I'll leave that up to others to decide), but our thinking was: if the premise of the film is to explore how and why it is that these instruments are gaining in popularity, it makes more sense and would be more interesting, to follow someone's discovery of modular synths, rather than someone who is already a long-time convert. I was most-definitely grateful for these opportunities, and I think you can sense from the interviews that we were having great, spontaneous conversations that reflect how happy and enthusiastic I was to be talking to such amazing people about my #1 passion: synths.

I find the notion of who more "deserves" to be in the film to be missing the point. This actually came up a lot in response to the first trailer: "How can you have Kilpatrick in there when he only has 2 modules. He doesn't deserve to be in there as much as Make Noise." (This was when Make Noise wasn't yet interviewed!).... Again, the film is exploring the resurgence of modulars, so anyone who is getting involved in the scene, no matter how significant their involvement is, helps to illustrate why this scene is growing.

thanks

Jason
ddoyen
Thoroughly enjoyed the whole thing. My only complaint is that I couldn't get through more than an hour at a time without getting the itch to pause it and jam for a bit!
aen
BillyR wrote:
My only question was how there was little to no reference to Eno? He played an EMS Synthi in Roxy Music, the film talked about EMS quite a bit, but there was barely a name drop of Eno?


It seemed like they tried to stay away from Rock music as much as possible?

Anyway, I really liked this movie. Like, a lot a lot. I really appreciate a doc made by people who are actually invested, and feel it's worthwhile to get some details in there. I'm getting pretty worn out by the 40 minute history/national geographic/discovery style "light documentary." (probably because I watch netflix at work)

I see myself watching it over and over.
BillyR
Oh I loved the film. The absence of Eno was just a curiosity, not a gripe. Was curious as to whether it was a conscious decision, legal one, or just didn't come up because it wasn't important? It's just interesting (in a good way) that every electronic music documentary glorifies Eno, but this one didn't give him so much as a nod. I can see the emphasis away from traditional music and more REAL electronic music. smile
s o l v e n t
BillyR wrote:
Oh I loved the film. The absence of Eno was just a curiosity, not a gripe. Was curious as to whether it was a conscious decision, legal one, or just didn't come up because it wasn't important? It's just interesting (in a good way) that every electronic music documentary glorifies Eno, but this one didn't give him so much as a nod. I can see the emphasis away from traditional music and more REAL electronic music. smile


Flood mentioned him!
BillyR
I remember that. Still way less than I'm use to hearing. razz

By the way, your soundtrack was great. Made me go find and listen to your RDJCS5 EP on MOG and love it! I'll have to pick it up somehow. we're not worthy
clarke68
Still no discs yet (c'mon USPS...don't you know the weekend is here!?!), but reading some of your comments makes me realize what a tough time IDOW is going to have living up our expectations. A lot of us contributed to the first Kicksktarter round, and have been looking forward to it (and manufacturing our own hype) for a long time.

That said, I think it'll be awesome even if it's just a 4 hour version of the original trailer. thumbs up


s o l v e n t wrote:
BTW the narrator is Navs of navsmodularlab.blogspot.ca / regular MW forum contributor ... not saying that should affect anyone's opinion of it, but a cool fact.

It does affect my opinion of it actually...makes me look forward to it even more!
shaft9000
it's a lot to digest. the eye-candy porn-factor is INSANE. some nice sounds too.

I really enjoyed the first part quite a bit. Seeing the various formats and approaches consecutively, and interviewing dedicated composers that still use them is crucial, so bravo... Camerawork is ace, soundmix and production is generally nice all-around. Navs narration owns, etc...
Allow me to nitpick about the apparent lack of mentions of Harold Bode or Raymond Scott. A bit too much credit was given Bob Moog - it creates an impression that he created the first sequencer ever, and also the first oscillator that could play in tune, it seems(both are incorrect). Obviously he looms larger than just about anyone, anyways, but still.
The second half is..well, i dunno. It felt pretty shapeless and dry, though, for something so long. A lot of it is the kind of thing that we'd seek out on our own while browsing muffs, anway, no? Kinda infomercial-y, i guess. Perhaps sprinkling the performances at intervals rather than grouping them all towards the end might have helped pacing, i dunno. Still, if not such a persuasive "must-watch" for the potential uninitiated, there is plenty to like - and understandably editing it all down would require a much more exclusive agenda to achieve some kind of tighter narrative; and of course, delay the release.

I'm not the easiest customer to please, but hey, you asked... hihi

Niggles or no - I have to applaud anyone willing to unleash such a monstrosity onto the public!!
joesilence
just finished watching the Hardcore Edition for the second time.

still enjoying it immensely.
noobyscooby
I watched the whole thing in one go tonight. As someone who's worked in educational television their whole adult life and has seen tens of thousands of hours of documentaries in my life i was excited to watch it but had my critical knives sharpened as well.

I liked it. A lot. But im hardcore. I could have watched a 40 hour doc on the subject to be honest.

The only thing I dont like at all is your personal substory about trying to sell yourself on modular. It got dropped in awkwardly at times and took momentum off the rails a couple of times. In a future/theatrical cut i would ditch it completely.

Its also quite the infomercial for eurorack but it is the most popular brand of modular and ithink is the impetus behind the resurgence of modular. So its important that a lot is in there.

Other than that, technically looked and sounded great. Especially for an independant doc with small budget. I will pm you some other comments and advice as far as the educational television industry goes.
s o l v e n t
Cool to see peoples' reviews/opinions here. I just want to clarify that I set up this thread for people to share their reviews & thoughts with each other. The post wasn't me asking you for your feedback for our consideration on how and what the theatrical cut should be. Theatrical cut is done. I just set up the thread so that reviews could all go in 1 place instead of in various other threads.

thanks

Jason
noobyscooby
Oh good to know that it's done. Exciting. I wonder how long it is.
Kingnimrod
I didn't really like some of the clothing and hairstyles.

Will those be updated for the theatrical cut?
sonicwarrior
Kingnimrod wrote:
Will those be updated for the theatrical cut?


In the theatrical cut everyone will be nude. nanners screaming goo yo
Kingnimrod
Redefining "synth porn!"

It's motherfucking bacon yo It's motherfucking bacon yo It's motherfucking bacon yo It's motherfucking bacon yo It's motherfucking bacon yo It's motherfucking bacon yo
Rod Serling Fan Club
Most of all, I liked seeing and hearing people I'm familiar with from muffs. I think Eric Barbour was my shop teacher in middle school.

EDIT: as far as an actual review. I liked that the importance of the transistor was mentioned in the historical section. Not to shortchange moog or buchla but the invention of the transistor was what made modular synths possible and its obvious from separate developments a the same time that this was the spark.

I would agree with some of the comments that the second half felt a bit... misguided, I guess? There was a lot of time spent on some guy that was playing a show but never used a modular before and incorporated a little bit in his show. He seemed nice enough, but I don't think any of that footage added anything.

The whole Solvent not sure about modular was kind of interesting but I feel like your telling the audience "I'm not really sold on modular, so why should you be" which might not be the best message for a movie about modular synths. Totally agree on the part about getting an important piece of gear and being like "this is it?". I would say that it is widely acknowledged on this forum that modulars are a rabbit hole and are probably not the most efficient way to make music. I think many of us feel like the guy with the big modcan system who doesn't care if he records any of it (so I am glad that thought was captured).

As a DIYer, I like the portion about the patchboard synth. I liked seeing dewanatron and would have liked to hear more from them. However, going to the phone museum and an electronics store seems to get off the path on a bit of a tangent.

Thanks for the movie.
Christopher Winkels
I enjoyed seeing myself for three seconds. From behind.
Kingnimrod
(Whispering "back that ass up, oh yeah.")
gobobog
Just finished watching the whole thing. So glad to be able to watch it finally; I had forgotten when I actually pitched in on kickstarter, so it was kind of like Christmas in August for me.

Overall, I was just glad to see the faces behind the modules, it definitely made me feel more connected to y'all. I think they covered most of the bases... interesting to see how much time they contributed to some areas. Glad to see they devoted a good amount of time to performers/performance. Soundtrack was great as well, good job solvent

I think part 1 was good at describing the history of modular, and was structured very well. Part 2 jumped around a bit. I imagine a theatrical release will have more of part 1 than part 2, but it's important to include the current enthusiasm that is captured in part 2.
AnalogBastard
Christopher Winkels wrote:
I enjoyed seeing myself for three seconds. From behind.
Thought I recognized that noggin thumbs up

I almost forgot I had ordered this..what a treat ! Just watched part I applause
Ockeghem
Part one was really very good. Of course it is not possible to cover everything and everybody.
Looking forward to part two.
Enjoy the show! Enjoy the show!
dubnspace
got mine, think I got a faulty batteryACID module though.. who can I talk to about this?
s o l v e n t
dubnspace wrote:
got mine, think I got a faulty batteryACID module though.. who can I talk to about this?


hmm they were all tested.

info [at] idreamofwires [dot] org, & CC hex [at] hexinverter [dot] net
s o l v e n t
Please let's keep this thread to reviews, thanks.
darenager
Just sat through all 4 hours, brilliant, worth every penny, I look foreward to more. The only slight complaint I'd have was some of the flashing video fx were a bit hard on the eyes, but fortunately there were not many.

Congratulations and thanks to all involved, you made something special here thumbs up
oliver69
Fantastic Documentary, really enjoyed it.

Personally I could of done with an extra hour for part 2 and left the Part 1 for the people who aren't familiar with the beginnings of modular synthesis on another disc. I would of liked to seen more of Gary Numan, Gavin Russom and his DIY Stuff, and also could of done with a mention/interview of Eno.

But overall I thought you guys did a fantastic job! You have just fuelled my obbession for modular synthesis even more!

It's peanut butter jelly time! SlayerBadger!
skery
I just got through it, really enjoyed both parts, like others I thought the first part was great, the second I would have liked more. Never thought a 4 hour movie I would want more of.

I want more of the interviews. There was one frustrating scene with vince clarke where it showed him talking to Solvent but the VoiceOver ran over it, and wish more of the noodles by the artists were shown, for a couple of reasons. First, just to show the sound difference between the different modulars, but also the different styles the artists bring to the modulars. I thought solvent's soundtrack was great though, quite varied, showed lots of styles and elements. Look forward to the cd.

Really would like to see more of the extended interviews, especially vince Clarke, Daniel Miller, Gary Numan, Trent Reznor, jack dangers. I felt we got a lot of what the old guys said, but maybe the 2nd part was spread a little thin on the big guys, and focused too much on the guy handed a modular two days before.

Solvent's story broke up a bit towards the end but I really liked the girl's story. (What was her name? I prefer in docs that they throw up the names a couple of times. I can't always remember who they are.

Anyway, great job!
veygo1
Fantastic doc, well worth the wait. Loved every min. No narration complaints from me,all worked great. Brilliant job, blue ray looks great...bring on the 8 hr version pt 2..
de_raaf
really great job, it watched it in a whole with a 15 minute break
the first part is really well done docu, and can sit next to other more historic documents or nicely fills some gaps, my only remark is it should have stopped after jack dangers with his synth100, the kid with his dream synth, really beautiful moment, hard to surpass, or placed at the very end

2nd part i enjoyed a lot too, a few moments it lots it tension, quite like the nod to how is it made (or how is that canadian program called on discovery) some interviews could have been a bit longer or more in depth to give more overall strength to this great effort
really liked solvent story, very honest view i think!

but overall an amazing job and effort, a great way to see a closer look on some musicians and makers, defiantly more amazed by this community
KnobHell
You guys do realize that the domain name synth.xxx is available?

Kingnimrod wrote:
Redefining "synth porn!"

It's motherfucking bacon yo It's motherfucking bacon yo It's motherfucking bacon yo It's motherfucking bacon yo It's motherfucking bacon yo It's motherfucking bacon yo
pugix
I especially liked the segue in Part 2, where precision control with digital modules and computers is followed by potato-generated CV. Vegetable-Controlled Oscillators. lol
legionhwp
Re-watched the HE part II this week and wanted to mention something I thought they did which I have never seen anywhere else...

The coverage of ALL modular users was very interesting. There are mentions and even some interviews with manufacturers mentioning a growing portion of EURO users who not only are not musicians, but aren't even really traditional electronic synth or modular users. One manufacturer mentioned some people patch up their units for the blinking lights alone. Paul S. of MOTM had a very insightful comment about the differences between his 5U buyers and Euro buyers. In most cases when artists were dabling in modular for the first time it was usually euro and often esoteric stuff (ie: not just Doepfer). For some of this crowd you don't even need to know what the module is or does as long as you have fun getting something out of it. (now the legending on Make Noise is starting to make more sense to me!)

Most electronic music documentaries focus only on the history and geek fanboys. IDOW HE goes further than that which I thought was quite enlightening. I personally didn't always understand or appreciate some of the applications folks have for these creatures but I thought it was very cool that the documentary showed multiple sides to the "new" wave of modular luv.
Valleyroad
Loving it!
When does the double time mega hardcore minimum 8 hour edition start to ship. love
darenager
Oh yeah, the narration was up to BBC standards easily, great job.
de_raaf
paul is a bit narrow minded to who uses eurorack, maybe it just because 5u is done direct and euro through distributors/shops, a little shortsighted that kind of gives a feel why i should buy his modules though, fuck elite stuff
darenager
Erm probably not really a review or thought on IDOW is it?

And besides, hardly elite behaviour https://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=91811

I think maybe you misunderstood what he was saying? I didn't read it like that.
de_raaf
sorry i already reviewed, just passage that i found narrow minded because he has less contact with euro people than 5u etc and their motivation, he does great things!, but sometimes his views are a bit not so openminded , it just founded pretty dumb how its comes over in the docu
deastman
I finally was able to sit down and watch the whole film. What a tremendous piece of work! It was great to see so many different musicians, manufacturers, and formats represented. I know some people were disappointed by who was left out, but at 4 hours already, I think it achieved it's objective of presenting an overall view of the resurgence of modulars. As someone who works in video myself, I know all too well how much effort goes into a production of this scale, and I'm in awe that it was completed by a crew of two! This film is an amazing gift to our community, so thank you both for all your hard work. I can't wait to see the feature version in the theater!
Robert McLeod
I loved it and felt honoured to have played my miniscule role in this effort just by parting with a few dollars.

* It was pleasantly unexpected to hear a British accented voice pronounce Moog the 'traditionally American' way (hides), I got a real kick out of that (sometimes it's the strangest little things that push my happy button).
* Seeing the passion expressed by everyone, as well as connecting real people to those who were to me were previously only online personnae was fascinating.[/list]

At 4 hours I did not find it long, it just felt like a privilege to see such a beautiful effort put into capturing something I care for such much: our musical community and what makes us tick. Thus ends my sermon waah thumbs up applause
Mongo1
I really enjoyed the first half - there was a clear purpose to the narrative, and although it did overemphasize Robert Moog (IMO), it was still really good.
The second half kind of lost my interest. I found myself pausing the video to go do other things several times, and continuing later.

On reflection, I think it was because the narrative in the second part was really unfocused. I would have a hard time telling anyone what it was 'about'. Clearly it was a look at how things are now, but I grew pretty bored during some of the interviews. I also found that the narrative thread switched around sort of aimlessly sometimes. I think most of that could be fixed with some judicious editing.

The highlight of the second part for me was the telephone switchboard stuff. Absolutely fascinating. I also enjoyed hearing how people got into the business of making modules.

I definitely agree with the comments made previously about the 'credentials' for most of these people. I had no idea who a lot of them were just based on the credentials shown. That made it a little tough to get involved in.

All that said and done, I did enjoy this film. Thanks for the tremendous effort you've put into it.

Gary
Minimoog56
Saw the film today for the third time.

Overall, I thought IDOW is a work of love, and a well made documentary profiling the diverse personalities and scenes comprising the modular experience in our time. I am glad it was made. Excellent soundtrack. Good work gentlemen.
g0lem
first post-watching thoughts: fuck you deadmau5.
climbingtyler
g0lem wrote:
first post-watching thoughts: fuck you deadmau5.


Is that just gear envy or actual hate?

Also why does everyone seem to hate deadmau5?
g0lem
climbingtyler wrote:
g0lem wrote:
first post-watching thoughts: fuck you deadmau5.


Is that just gear envy or actual hate?

Also why does everyone seem to hate deadmau5?



pure unadulterated gear envy.


edit: i also hate his work, but in this case it's gear envy.
VanEck
Received my copy of the hardcore edition this morning, and just finished watching part 1. Really enjoying it so far. Narration is top notch.

My only slight criticism echoes what someone else in this thread mentioned about how the "name/info" pop ups when people are talking tend to come in a bit late, not often enough, or with not enough info. I can agree with that I think. The pop ups could happen right as they start talking every time, and probably squeeze in a bit more info. I think the same could apply to the gear... whenever a certain important piece of gear is shown, the name and some basic info/trivia could pop up with it.

Can't wait to watch part 2.
climbingtyler
g0lem wrote:
climbingtyler wrote:
g0lem wrote:
first post-watching thoughts: fuck you deadmau5.


Is that just gear envy or actual hate?

Also why does everyone seem to hate deadmau5?



pure unadulterated gear envy.


edit: i also hate his work, but in this case it's gear envy.


Personally, I love his music. But we are all entitled to our opinions.
qu.one
Tbh, I was a little let down. The stories of the two protagonists in part two were really of no interest to me. And a lot of the artists in PT2 picked as modular representatives were... not really modular users. But I guess that's the point - it's growing. I would have been way more interested in watching clips of various synth meets around the globe with real users who truly have the passion for these things. Or more manufacturers. There was definitely a Canadian lean.

I did enjoy part one more - and wished it were the longer if the two.

A HUGE letdown (which is not the movies fault) was Vince Clarke not having one synth on. At least it seemed that way. When solvent asks how different the roland 700 sounds from the 100, VC doesn't even turn them on to make an auditory response after using the generic term of "phatter." Same could be said for Deadmau5. Huge modcan, no sound. Not one patch cord. Waste of screen time to have either of ghose guys IMO. I'm sure they were there for the celebrity, system size and wow factor.

No mention of John Blacet, Grant Richter, ASys or ASol. I know you can't cover everything - but Blacet? Richter?

I could watch Andreas Schneider all day though. 4 hours of him, fuck yeah. Or 2 hours of Schneider and the other two of Barbour.

Regardless - it definitely made me want to go and patch something up.
JohnLRice
Got mine and my T-Shirt yesterday! hyper Thanks! we're not worthy Haven't had time to watch yet but I will soon!
Ockeghem
I've seen part two, and after reading most of the reviews here.
I did like seeing the stories of Solvent and Lori, and enjoyed the virtual trips to the synth shops and the manufacturer comments.
I do think that the second half lacks a consistent point-of-view, in a way.
The first half definitely sends a message to me that modulars have been unjustly neglected in the 80s-90s and are regaining public attention.
Well and good. This makes me happy.
But when I watch the second half, there seems to be no clear answer given to those who like analog polys, or digital synths, or computers, better than a modular. Or to those who buy Euro mainly for the pretty blinking lights. (Really?) And then the idea that, oh well, SMT and miniaturization is inevitable and we may very quickly see it all become obsolete again. This leaves me in doubts.
And, maybe there isn't a clear answer. Maybe I'm just a 5U guy and stuck in the seventies.
"It begins with a blessing,
And ends with a curse,
Making things easy
By making things worse."
thesnow
honestly if it wasn't for part one the film would not have been as good. so i feel a little for people that will only see the "theatrical" version.

when all this was still cooking it did kind of rub me the wrong way a little that certain synth designers would not be included and solvent's automatic attitude toward it was kind of biased it seemed. picking his favorites or what he thought deserved it more or was more worthy of the effort.

in the end it's a nice little film but now I'm kind of glad and it's kind of cool that the main synth designers I feel were missing did not end up in the film. quite the coincidence I think. almost as if they all knew better not to play.

it will be an interesting film for a lot of newbies and cause a lot of new euro converts nonetheless.
tachyons+
Just finished watching it, very overrrrloooaddeddd on syyynntthhssss!!!

The first hour or so was great, excellent top notch perfect. Learned a lot...

Love the Subotnik talks and the Mills College old heads.
The Manhattan Project stuff just mind-blowing!!!
The early Canadian synth dude, that was beautiful.
The polarization of East and West U.S. minds making synth designs.
The choice of old stock footage, blended and edited superbly!

After that kinda got lost in stuff kinda already learned via BBC Synth Britannia, personal use of early digital and analog synths and such. But the film immediately comes out of that and goes way way further....

Second part was inspiring, highly intersting but in one sitting just very very overwhelming. Know a lot of those modern cats from studies and even personally through my own work and just wow its all over the place.

Its really just something that deserves re-watching over and over again. Through time and studying up on who these people are at the end. In one sitting, my brain is simply melted. Its really nice though, usually at the end of a good documentary, You Want More!!! Well, this delivers heavily and by Billion-X!

Would have loved to see Simeon of Silver Apples talk about his Oscillator music making set-up in part 1 for sure....

And more video synthesis action but thats obviously a film within itself.

Look forward to watching this for the rest of my life for needed inspiration and wonder plus sharing with friends.

Though on a personal note, have to admit, absolutely Love! the snobby attitudes, the nerding out, the who-fckn cares of a lot of the people on their viewpoints on the world of synths through out the film. Usually when I talk like this to others, people just tell me I am wrong or snobby. Ha! Its almost like a cinematic stand that I Am Not Crazy! On my personal viewpoints on analog and such. Though in the end of the day we are of course, all wrong and so right. Its all about having fun and this film definitely seemed like it was having fun in a high quality film crafting way.

Also the synth salesman in the U.K. could easily play Doctor Who.

Look forward to seeing the theatre edit on a big screen in the future!
neilbaldwin
I finished watching it at the weekend too.

I have similar feelings to qu.one in that there were some odd choices of people to include and then some glaring omissions: one of the biggest for me, Tom Bugs? But then I guess not everyone would want to be included so may not have been a decision of the makers.

First half I found really fascinating and there were some great interviews and some awesome vintage gear porn.

Second half not so much. Should've spent the whole second half just interviewing Andreas.

It also seemed to have a 'melodic' slant to the whole thing and I get the feeling this is a reflection of the particular style that the makers were interested in as it matched their own musical output. More experimental/challenging stuff never seemed to get a look in.

The two guys who made the synths out of old telephones etc. was the highlight of part two for me.

There were also people like the guy from EA: why? I nearly did a sick in my mouth at that bit. And the trance-y DJ (name escapes me) at Mutek who, while I quite enjoyed the bits from his set, was mainly using Live/MPC.

Having said that, hats off to the makers for a tremendous piece of work.
pugix
neilbaldwin wrote:

I have similar feelings to qu.one in that there were some odd choices of people to include and then some glaring omissions: one of the biggest for me, Tom Bugs? But then I guess not everyone would want to be included so may not have been a decision of the makers.


I wonder if this explains the non-mention of Blacet Research and John Blacet, despite numerous shots with racks of his modules.
pugix
neilbaldwin wrote:

It also seemed to have a 'melodic' slant to the whole thing and I get the feeling this is a reflection of the particular style that the makers were interested in as it matched their own musical output. More experimental/challenging stuff never seemed to get a look in.


I had the same impression.
iamerror
I enjoyed every single minute of it.

Only one flaw: It's still too short. Four hours just went by like nothin'... Dead Banana

Can I order a 9 hour version for Christmas, please?

P.S.: Thank you so much for putting all that work and love into IDOW. THANK YOU. You guys changed my life!
s o l v e n t
pugix wrote:
neilbaldwin wrote:

It also seemed to have a 'melodic' slant to the whole thing and I get the feeling this is a reflection of the particular style that the makers were interested in as it matched their own musical output. More experimental/challenging stuff never seemed to get a look in.


I had the same impression.


Morton Subotnick
Keith Fullerton Whitman
Robert AA Lowe
Surachai
Richard Devine
Container
Skinny Puppy
Orphx
... for a start
pugix
Yes, but we didn't hear much of their music.
emdot_ambient
Well, it's interesting how people can watch the same thing and experience something completely different, because throughout much of the film I was thinking that the melodic side was pretty much absent, getting just little snippets here and there while the more experimental/noisier stuff was what we heard most!
emdot_ambient
As for review...I just sat through all of it with just a bathroom break in between parts.

Talk about hardcore, I feel exhausted after so much stellar synth pr0n!

As with most everyone else, I found the first part astoundingly good. Unlike most others, I found the second part quite good as well. What it succeeded at was representing the huge variety of approaches to module design, business model, design philosophies, and indeed the unfathomably multifarious types of people involved in the scene both in manufacturing and actual synth use.

It was great seeing people I've talked to and bought PCBs from here, and I was so glad that negative opinions of modulars and the people using them were given voice, too. To have done otherwise would have turned the film into a huge self-love fanboy festival, which I did not think this ended up being.

And in that regard, the journey and skepticism of Solvent was our guide from the traditional synth user into modular user, whereas the DIYer (who goes by the name meridian7 on the intertubes) is the flip side of the coin: the non-synth user coming to modulars full of wonderment and curiosity.

So much ground is covered in the second half, it's kind of mind-spinning.

I too have my "why didn't they mention/interview so-and-so" list, but ultimately that kind of complaint is ridiculous and petty. Do you really expect documentaries on any subject to cover every possible person who was in any way involved in whatever the film is about? This ins't a documentary about the modulars that are now available, or even every historic modular out there. It's about the resurgence of modulars, about modulars catching the imaginations of whole new generations.

And I think it did a fine job.

OH, AND...my 3XL IDOW Moog style t-shirts are AWESOME! thumbs up
s o l v e n t
emdot_ambient wrote:
As with most everyone else, I found the first part astoundingly good. Unlike most others, I found the second part quite good as well.


Thanks for the kind words. Just want to point out that this synopsis of "most others" not enjoying pt2 doesn't reflect reality at all. Here on MW we are reading some reviews from the nitpicky-est of nitpickers. Which is fine... but not reflective at all of the kind of feedback we are getting overall, the vast majority of which is extremely positive towards pts 1 & 2.
tachyons+
Please do a reality TV show starring Andreas Schneider!
g0lem
i really wanted the cevin key interview to be longer.
i'm glad they posted the extended interview for chris carter because he was one of the most interesting people interviewed.
VanEck
I'm glad there wasn't too much focus on individual manufacturers, and more focus instead on the "end users" and some bands utilizing modulars. There are simply too many manufacturers out there... in the world of Euro alone, you could dedicate an entire movie to interviewing the minds of the makers.

Too much focus on manufacturers of today would have just felt like a giant commercial.
Kingnimrod
I think it's a great effort - certainly better than any other gear-centric documentary I've ever watched. The Moog documentary is deadly boring by comparison.

I do video editing myself,and it can be quite a challenge piecing together footage into a coherent narrative, especially as much as they had to work with. They have done a great job - it could have been a disorganized hodgepodge of interviews and still be somewhat interesting, but the 4 hours wouldn't fly by so quickly if the editing wasn't excellent.
emdot_ambient
tachyons+ wrote:
Please do a reality TV show starring Andreas Schneider!

I've seen interviews with him done at trade shows as well...the man wears me out. hihi
deastman
Personally I really enjoyed part 2. It's important to keep in mind that this is the hardcore edition. It's 4 hours, and most of that was spent in the second part. It would be extremely difficult to maintain a tight and cohesive narrative over such a long time. I'm guessing that Jason's "modular quest" was added later on as a narrative device to try and tie it all together. I'm sure the theatrical release will be much more successful in spinning a succinct storyline. But we didn't want that, did we? We want the hardcore edition! SlayerBadger!
emdot_ambient
Oh, also wanted to add that I really liked the live concert scenes in Montreal. That performance space is a total dream. I about shit myself.
narwhal
yes, i preferred the second disk. The first is great in terms of narrative but it's a story i've heard before in a sense. Pulling together a established narrative over 40 years is always going to be easier than imposing one on 5-10. For me the eurorack centric second disk was much more interesting and really nice to put faces to names. Personally I liked the inclusion of the EA sound design guy and also the human interest narratives (lori/jason etc) to widen the appeal. Obviously each person can say where they'd like more emphasis and less emphasis but I really enjoyed it. Certainly looks like a monster undertaking. Lastly I hope everyone reads and respects the note that comes with disk.

And yes, Andreas Schneider definitely needs a youtube tv show. SlayerBadger!

Great work folks=]
Tombola
Mine just arrived today, I haven't watched it yet.

Just wanted to send huge respect to Solvent & co, can't believe the amount of complaining and whingeing they've had to put up with.

It's an incredible achievement, I can't begin to think how much work, investment and stress must have gone into this project.
rezzn8r
s o l v e n t wrote:
emdot_ambient wrote:
As with most everyone else, I found the first part astoundingly good. Unlike most others, I found the second part quite good as well.


Thanks for the kind words. Just want to point out that this synopsis of "most others" not enjoying pt2 doesn't reflect reality at all. Here on MW we are reading some reviews from the nitpicky-est of nitpickers. Which is fine... but not reflective at all of the kind of feedback we are getting overall, the vast majority of which is extremely positive towards pts 1 & 2.


Indeed! This doc rocks! we're not worthy
My comments about part 2 were meant as constructive feedback, and were very much 'nitpicking'.
Kaput
I've finished watching my copy (two sittings).

Wonderful work - I loved every minute. And Navs' narration was spot-on.

Star of the show for me was Dieter Doepfer - he just seems like a really modest guy who knows his stuff.

I didn't want it to end. 4 hours wasn't enough for me. hihi

thumbs up
tachyons+
What about the guy who was like 98% of people who buy my stuff are Pro's and .3% who buy the other stuff are amateurs, knob-twiddlers.

What a pompous ass. Ha~!

PS: Pro's usually can not create creative unique music.
They are too busy being pro.
thesnow
tachyons+ wrote:
What about the guy who was like 98% of people who buy my stuff are Pro's and .3% who buy the other stuff are amateurs, knob-twiddlers.

What a pompous ass. Ha~!

PS: Pro's usually can not create creative unique music.
They are too busy being pro.


what are you talking about he was talking about both of his formats and informing that the people that buy his 5U format modules usually tend to be professional musicians or engineers in the field (nothing wrong with that) and the people that buy his euro format modules usually tend not to be. so what is your problem with that?
qu.one
Tombola wrote:
can't believe the amount of complaining and whining they've had to put up with.


It's not that when they are asking for feedback.
s o l v e n t
I posted this thread so that there was a unified place for people to express their opinions with each other, instead of it ending up in various other threads. Additionally, a big reason that I started the thread so that it would be titled "IDOW: Hardcore Edition" instead of I Dream Of Wires, as per the note that came with the DVD/BRD.

I'm reading it, sure. And I don't want to discourage people expressing their opinions, positive or negative. But we didn't ask for feedback, so better to write the review for other MW members than think of it as offering advice for the filmmakers.

I don't believe that the director Robert has even read this thread, nor have I discussed with him any of the critiques that have come up. No plans to do so, either!

qu.one wrote:
Tombola wrote:
can't believe the amount of complaining and whining they've had to put up with.


It's not that when they are asking for feedback.
emdot_ambient
thesnow wrote:
tachyons+ wrote:
What about the guy who was like 98% of people who buy my stuff are Pro's and .3% who buy the other stuff are amateurs, knob-twiddlers.

What a pompous ass. Ha~!

PS: Pro's usually can not create creative unique music.
They are too busy being pro.


what are you talking about he was talking about both of his formats and informing that the people that buy his 5U format modules usually tend to be professional musicians or engineers in the field (nothing wrong with that) and the people that buy his euro format modules usually tend not to be. so what is your problem with that?


Yep. People like Robert Rich built their modulars around his 5U systems. Why? Mainly because their build quality was so exacting. Expensive switches, near audiophile component choices, etc.

And now he's moved into Eurorack because that's really where sales are. His percentages might have been hyperbole, but he's largely just talking truth. And so what? If he was that big of a large format purist, he never would have touched Eurorack format.

He also came up with a brilliant phrase: TTH (Turn Till Happy). Admit it, we've all been there. hihi
noobyscooby
I think the comment was a bit off. There are plenty of 5U/MOTM knob twiddlers and many professional musicians using eurorack.
s o l v e n t
Personally I really enjoyed Paul Schreiber's perspective, coming at things from a totally different angle and background than most manufacturers, especially amongst the eurorack guys; speaking as a pure engineer. Somewhat baffling coming from a music instrument designer, but intriguing. Ultimately the awesomeness of his instruments speak for themselves IMO.

I'm a professional musician and a eurorack user, and not the least bit offended by his statements about the eurorack market. It's totally exaggerated and paints a poor generalization of eurorack users, but there is some truth to it as well. Plus it's hilarious. For me it's the same as a lot of the 5U guys getting riled up about Barbour's comments that they're stuck in the 70s. Also an unfair generalization, and also hilarious.

Maybe I should start a thread for discussion/debates about what people in the film said/did/etc, since it's not really an "opinion" about the film itself...?
kuxaan-sum
Got through part 1 and a portion of part 2.
So far I am liking 2 a bit more, but 1 was very well thought out and informational.
2 has been a little random (I like that...kind of reminds me of some of my cases) but more exciting in the sense of the resurgence.

I hope to watch remainder tomorrow evening.

Good job Solvent!!
emdot_ambient
s o l v e n t wrote:
...For me it's the same as a lot of the 5U guys getting riled up about Barbour's comments that they're stuck in the 70s. Also an unfair generalization, and also hilarious.

And at least partly true, too. This coming from an old guy who prefers 5U and who is stuck in the 70s. "Modular synth" to me means one thing: Klaus Schulze. And I wasn't offended, nor disappointed that Schulze's name never came up in the film.

But I do agree with the guy who said he has nothing against Eurorack, only he finds some of it to be really ugly.
sys700
Awesome documentary!
shaft9000
Synth Sandwich
FlameTop
Just finished watching it this evening. I must say the thing that impressed me the most was the excellent balance of the content. We all know the modular scene is a mix of disparate personalities, technologies and ideals. Thats what makes the modular scene and muffs so vibrant. I found the balance of art vs tech vs history vs future in the movie spot on. Really very well put together. Well done! Bravo!
Bryan B
I sat and watched the film last weekend and loved it all start to finish! My fiance watched the last half hour no complaints (which means it was interesting even to someone who isn't into synthesizers). She was even asking me questions afterward, nice job. My 9-year old step daughter to be was even glued to the TV during some parts of it (although some of the language wasn't quite appropriate, I lucked out as far as her timing).

I was waiting for some of the parts I had accidentally read about in some reviews and was happy to find them far less controversial than I had expected. The whole SMT section applies to more formats than Euro and will affect all formats in some form or another in the near future. I didn't interpret that section as saying Euro is the only format with a future.

I think the most amazing thing with being on this forum (and going to synth meets) is that it humanizes the whole culture while also connecting it. This movie continues that concept. When you see interviews with all of the artists, collectors and manufacturers; it really brings everyone closer together and removes a layer of mystery. How could you not view the people in this film as human and worth some level of respect (as opposed to stores or corporations with no name, face or personality)? I feel like I now have a more complex picture of at least some of what is going on thanks to this film.

The film had a general optimism toward the growing popularity of modular synthesizers, which I agree with and wholeheartedly support.

Thank you to everyone who made, were interviewed or even pledged money to make this film happen. I feel like you all really did something awesome!

Lastly, I want to thank you for listening (to a bunch of us) and releasing this in the Blu-Ray format! I loved watching it on my 55" TV in all of it's HD nerdery! I honestly wouldn't have enjoyed the level of detail as much in a DVD format, the amazing content would have more than made up for it anyway.
BadBadger
emdot_ambient wrote:
But I do agree with the guy who said he has nothing against Eurorack, only he finds some of it to be really ugly.

I'm in complete agreement. Though I'm only now fixin' to begin to prepare to commence to get started putting my first Eurorack together, I'm at once pleased and turned off with the variety of artwork on some of the modules I've discovered in my research.

I absolutely appreciate the need to stand out in the crowd and to express one's uniqueness. Some of the art is not only clever, but brilliant—reflecting the imagination and ingenuity of these electronic wizards. Still, at times the art only seems to make things even more confusing than they already are. It's bad enough that we have to translate the different names/labels different designers give the exact same functions, but now we have to have masters degrees in art appreciation just to know what fucking jack to plug this clock signal into? Here's an idea—include a blank panel and I'll have my four-year-old niece draw what she thinks an EG out should look like on the damn thing. Then I'll take the original and stick it on my fridge. Mr. Green

Does that make me a fuddy-duddy? Fuckin-A, you whippersnappers! you kids get off my lawn




But, back to why we're here. While to some it may seem inexcusable that Jason and Robert had the unmitigated gall to go off on their own and create a movie about an arcane subject that only a small and passionate group of people can deeply appreciate, without consulting us on the script and cast, I couldn't be more pleased!

I will watch all four hours many times, still learn new things, and enjoy being informed and entertained by the eclectic group that they were able to interview. Not to mention how many times I will probably freeze the disc to drool over the amazing collections of hardware. I wish I had the time, money, and passion to produce such an unusual, well-shot, and way overdue documentary. Frankly, I'm in awe of their tenacity, spirit, and risk-taking.

I hope this film is a huge success for these guys. And I'm sure the shorter, theatrical version will be far more interesting and entertaining to the general public, to the point that IDOW may be seen as an educational turning point. Maybe I won't hear that "Oh! Is that a mooooog?" so much anymore.

To this day, my mom has no fucking idea why her son has been so fascinated by all this weird shit. But when IDOW is released, and I ask her to watch it, I imagine she will find herself a big step closer to finally understanding.

And if Jason and Robert don't end up shitting in high cotton, they can still take pride in knowing that a world (albeit small) of nerds will always be ready to shake their hands, and buy them a beer. beer!

Come to Atlanta, boys. I can't put you up in the Ritz-Carlton, but breakfast at the Waffle House is on me! thumbs up

"This one goes to eleven!"
KnobHell
I just finished watching IDOW tonight. I really loved the film!!

Though if I hear the words "euro rack" any time soon I think I will vomit.

I can appreciate that ER is popular and offers an amazing number of options. But it's just a freaking panel format for petes sake! You can put any electronics behind any format. I think is was a bit unfair to associate electronics with format. Behind some of my modules are uC's...

Loved the music, the people, the entire concept. It was great to see the faces of many of you other there in muffs land.

Bravo! applause
kuxaan-sum
The Buchla reference from Eric:
Does this mean Metasonix is contemplating the release of an iShit module?
hexenexeh
As someone who was familiar with the older gear but inactive for a few years before being drawn back in, it's a good primer on where the eurorack and new school stuff is coming from, the people behind it.
For instance - "whoa, is that Paul Barker?"
ignatius
finally had a block of time this morning to watch IDOW hardcore edition. it goes well w/eating chicken and waffles (comfort food) on the basement couch.

really awesome. fun. inspiring and just super well done. editing is great. it sounds awesome. looks awesome.

thanks to everyone who took part in it and made time to be interviewed and provide content...

and thanks to IDOW for going all in and making the longer cut for us addicted peoples. thumbs up
clarke68
Just watched (most of) it last night.

Totally awesome...loved it. Loved it!!! Even more than I thought I would. There are some minor niggles here and there, things that could be more professional or whatever (things that probably would have gotten addressed if more than two people had made the film) but I expected (and would have forgiven) much worse.

Part 1 is excellent...ready for the BBC, IMO. Narration is top notch...I would have been impressed if I didn't know who it was, knowing it was Navs it blows me away. Does he do a lot of voice work? He certainly could.

The overall story of Moog & Buchla is one I already know, so it didn't blow my mind but I thought it was covered well. That said, hearing Morton Subotnick talk about "Switched on Bach" is worth the price of the DVD all by itself. hihi

I thought EMS got short shrift (at least early on)...seemingly dismissed by Wendy Carlos' comments, but I happen to know the back story on that and it would have taken a herculean amount of research to find it (short version: the VCS3 & Synthi oscillators actually track very well, but not many people know how to properly calibrate them...consequently the sales rep who showed it to Carlos didn't have it set up properly).

We're all fans of some musicians that we would have liked to see included, but I think the list of people who appear on camera is pretty impressive. I really liked Daniel Miller's contributions to the BBC synth pop documentary, and his comments in here are priceless (as was the inclusion of "Warm Leatherette"!).


Part 2 is...hardcore. 8_) Obviously not for everybody, but it wasn't meant to be. It was made, essentially, for me (okay, for us)...and I freaking love it. I completely understand everyone's comments but here's the thing: it's impossible to accurately describe/explain/represent any kind of cultural phenomenon while it's happening. Most documentaries are like Part 1...they (and everyone in them) has the insight/clarity that comes from hindsight. They saw what happened, saw how it influenced what happened later on, and have had some time (usually years) to process it. No one in 1965 could have explained the difference between east coast & west coast synthesis...they didn't even have the terms.

Usually, anyone who comes along who "speaks for a generation", "has their finger on the pulse of the zeitgeist", or whatever has an agenda. They have some perspective that they're pushing, usually at the expense (or at least the exclusion) of some other point(s) of view. The modular synth resurgence is happening right now (I don't think it's peaked yet) and IDOW HE does a good job impartially covering the scene. Things were left out because of the physical realities of things...there wasn't time to cover everything, and even if there was it wouldn't all fit on the DVD.

I was happy that it features more DIY than I expected. Lori Napoleon's project of making an old phone switchboard into a synth isn't typical sdiy (which makes it even cooler) but to hear her mention Ken Stone and unbox a Bi-N-Tic kit from Elby in a movie is just awesome. Awesome! And, she was a great tie in to the Dewanatron guys, who have been a big personal inspiration for a long time. The big takeaway, of course, is that everyone who makes modular gear is a DIYer. Don Buchla & Bob Moog are/were DIYers, as are Tony Rolando & Danjel van Tijn...they're just more talented/driven than most of us. Sheesh, you need a little comfortability with electronics just to plug a euro module in to the darn power supply. It may be popular, but this stuff isn't going to be ready for the Walmart crowd any time soon.

Great music throughout! People always talk over the music in a documentary, so as much as I would have loved more straight performance footage, I get it. Actually, some straight up music would have been great bonus features (if there were room on the disc(s) for bonus features). Still looking forward to the soundtrack CD. hyper Will it just have Solvent's music, or is there any chance of squeezing some of the other movie music on there (e.g. the Allen Ravenstine/Robert Wheeler jam, stuff from the Mutek conference, etc. )

Of course in my opinion, the major gaffe/oversight is the fact that I was at the meet in Berkeley, and I don't appear in the film at all. My wife is grateful for this, however, because if they had shown even 1 second of the corner my sleeve cuff I would get the disc out and show everyone that came over the the house for the next 10 years.

All in all, a fantastic effort. I hope it does great things for Jason & Robert's careers, and I hope it screens somewhere near where I live so I can show up wearing my t-shirt and say stuff like, "oh yeah...I helped fund this. I knew them back where they were on Kickstarter."



s o l v e n t wrote:
Personally I really enjoyed Paul Schreiber's perspective...I'm a professional musician and a eurorack user, and not the least bit offended by his statements about the eurorack market.

I'm not a professional musician, and I am a eurorack user...heck, I'm exactly who he was talking about...and I wasn't the least bit offended by his comment. In some ways, non-musicians are dream customers (look at all the people who buy pianos "so their kids can take lessons"): our money is just as good as the pros, but we'll never call up at 3am saying, "I'm on tour in Europe and my oscillators aren't tracking...help!"

BadBadger wrote:
While to some it may seem inexcusable that Jason and Robert had the unmitigated gall to go off on their own and create a movie about an arcane subject that only a small and passionate group of people can deeply appreciate, without consulting us on the script and cast, I couldn't be more pleased!

Actually, they did consult us, we just gave them more feedback (and much of it contradictory) than anyone could possibly implement and still have a film made before the end of the decade.
ignatius
@clarke68 - agree about part 1. hearing candid comments from Subotnik about switched on bach is fucking great.
s o l v e n t
clarke68 wrote:
Just watched (most of) it last night...


Very encouraging review clarke68, cheers for that! I really appreciate it that you have such a good sense of how monumental of an undertaking this was, and cut us some slack accordingly. You are spot on with your assessment that part1 was really so much easier to pull off, with history already written and decades of research, analysis and perspective at our disposal. Making sense out of all of material we managed to capture of what is going on now (*tonnes!*) - that was tough! Personally, I feel that even though pt2 isn't as smooth and cohesive of a watch, it actually contains most of my favorite moments and is more unique in the documentary realm than pt1.

To answer a couple of questions:

1. Navs *is* a professional narrator! We interviewed him for the film, then we went out to dinner with him afterwards. He mentioned his job and instantly I was like "!!!" - Robert & I had already discussed wanting a BBC style narrator with a British accent, and we hit the jackpot. What are the odds of finding a voice like that who even has a clue what it's all about, let alone someone who is totally immersed in this world. He nailed the narration on first attempt every time.

2. The soundtrack will be comprised entirely of the original music I created for IDOW. It's essentially a Solvent album. You hear most of it in the film, though a couple of tracks didn't make it on screen. Regarding the Ravenstine/Wheeler jams... info is scarce but they have been released! I have this pair of 12"s myself and they are very nice:

http://ubuprojex.net/wheelrave.html

thanks

Jason
BadBadger
clarke68 wrote:
BadBadger wrote:
While to some it may seem inexcusable that Jason and Robert had the unmitigated gall to go off on their own and create a movie about an arcane subject that only a small and passionate group of people can deeply appreciate, without consulting us on the script and cast, I couldn't be more pleased!

Actually, they did consult us, we just gave them more feedback (and much of it contradictory) than anyone could possibly implement and still have a film made before the end of the decade.


Ahhh. Well before I was hanging here. Good to know! Of course, the point I was making was in response to the constant haranguing about who was and wasn't interviewed, etc.
mckenic
Just two words...

Thank you!

And another two...

More please!

I know its not a review but Imna use this chance to say - Thank you Jason and please pass on my thanks to Robert!

I LOVED every second of it, really enjoyed the Solvent soundtrack and loved the concert music. Wonderful stuff. I do hope you consider an 'academic' version when all the dust settles - I could imagine giving a course on modular synthesis and the 1st part would be PERFECT for getting students up to speed!

It is really funny but Metasonix mostly rubs me up the wrong way on Muffs. I dont care what he names his modules etc but the (apparent) attitude in what he posts is like fingernails on a chalkboard for me... watching his interview segment in the movie REALLY, REALLY made me want to go for a pint of Guinness with the man! Just goes to show that text on a screen without context (or seeing the glint in a guys eye) is a very dangerous way to judge people! I very valuable lesson for me! My respect for the Yellow has rocketed just from watching him chat!

I am SO grateful to have been able to grab the DVD set - 4 hours is not enough!

Thank you for making this wonderful piece of work!
climbingtyler
Just finished part 1

I am pretty new to the hardware world so this was really cool getting to learn about the roots of what I am getting into.

Learning about how Moog and Buchla designed their synths with totally different ideas was really cool. Buchla wanted to re-invent music as we know it, while Moog wanted to musicians to use synthesizers in their music. Both of these ideas are amazing to me. It seems like it was a time when people really wanted to push boundaries (not that we aren't anymore, we just seemed to have slowed down now) and change the world.

Learning about the struggle of getting musicians to understand the advantage of modular synthesizers over pre-patched synths was very interesting. I can't believe people were literally throwing these things away. I would like to see some interviews of people who saw modular synths as garbage and hear their side of the story.

This has been pretty awesome so far!

I can't wait to see what part 2!
thesnow
Just watched IDOW HE for the second time and would like to sort of retract my last statement and say that part two is equally as good. Great documentary. I think part one is just so easy to love if you're a total geek. There's nothing like geeking out on moog and buchla history. And the history of the modular synthesizer is just so easy to geek out on. Also thank you for including some women in the documentary including lori napolean.

Only thing is I wish some of the interviews were longer. Extended interviews with christ carter, reznor and some of the synth designers for example.

Great documentary.
Monobass
Great interviews. Voiceover is a bit like a corporate training film or something, but maybe that's just a british perspective.

A blade runner style directors cut without voiceover would be good, you'd get to hear more of the soundtrack too smile
Themaybemachine
I though it was fantastic, not to subjective. I think it pushed me over the edge. Now I need a modular razz
joesilence
in the midst of my 7th viewing.
still loving it.

also compelling me to go make music in between. hyper
KnobHell
joesilence wrote:
in the midst of my 7th viewing.
still loving it.

also compelling me to go make music in between. hyper


The only way I'm going to keep up is too install a flat screen in the John!
XXXEsq
I watched it from end to end in one sitting. Spectacular! Well done sirs! thumbs up applause
joesilence
KnobHell wrote:
joesilence wrote:
in the midst of my 7th viewing.
still loving it.

also compelling me to go make music in between. hyper


The only way I'm going to keep up is too install a flat screen in the John!


i'll relent and go spend some time with my gear. Rockin' Banana!
jjclark
I just finished watching it, and I would like to congratulate Jason and Robert on a job well done.

Could it (should it) have included more and different people? Of course, and it would have been 20 hours long. I look at it like any documentary as one particular take on the subject. Somebody else is free to make their own documentary; this is Jason's and Robert's and they did what they could in the constraints they worked under.

The result was wonderful from my perspective as a life-long synth geek, especially the second half. If my father was still alive I would show him this video and say "THIS!!! - this is why I was always dragging you out to the Heathkit store when I was a kid, and tortured you with out of tune squeaks and squeals while you were trying to get some sleep before your night shift".

I thought the second half of the film captured clearly the excitement and motivation of people who are really into synths. I recognized a bit of myself in a lot of the people interviewed (and all of myself in one person :-). I think I can safely say that most builders and DIY types have found themselves at one time or another scavenging through electronics part stores (won't call them junk yards) like Lori Napoleon and Danjel Van Tijn in the movie. I just love scrounging through places like that.

Particular highlights for me were the interviews with Dieter Doepfer and Danjel van Tijn (although I already Dan quite well). Andreas Schneider's interview was great, and I found it interesting to see the "colorful" neighborhood of his store.

In closing must also add that I really liked Navs' narration. I didn't realize it was him til I read this thread. Great timing and diction and a lovely accent. Kind of reminded me of listening to recordings of Alan Watts.
defenestration
the story about the girl making the switchboard modular I found fairly engaging, captured and distilled a lot of the passion

andreas schneider is definitely a very memorable modular philosopher

I didn't enjoy the 'BBC' approach very much. My girlfriend commented that this gave the presentation more gravitas and would help casual audiences take the subject more seriously. I can't disagree but for some reason I found it jarring.

Whenever the narration 'philosophized' or the cinematography got a bit too 'artistic' it just bugged me - I wanted a tighter focus on the people and how all these resonating ideas and their experiences grappling with fundamental issues of meaning and agency develop the ways they feel and think. At first I felt like the editorial decisions didn't 'get it' but now I'm starting to think the director may actually be experiencing a form of expert blindness due to his proximity to the subject matter.

For myself the 'solvent storyline' is not successful partly because Jason Amm lacks the charisma to make me care about his 'modular journey'. Also the most relevant parts of it from a practical perspective were totally left out - nothing on the basic design philosophies of assembling small modular which might dictate module choice (replicate a monosynth, generative patches, etc.) or any details about the system Jason actually ended up putting together, and more specifically, why he made the choices that he did.

Did anyone else feel the overwhelming urge to go outside, get some sun, and talk to some pretty girls after they finished watching? hihi
joesilence
defenestration wrote:
Did anyone else feel the overwhelming urge to go outside, get some sun, and talk to some pretty girls after they finished watching? hihi


well, in my case my wife (pretty girl) came home from work for lunch at the end of one particular viewing.
...with Korean food, too (bonus).
i got some sun a few hours later when i picked up our kids from school. thumbs up
noobyscooby
thumbs up It's motherfucking bacon yo
subcon
constructively thinking. It would have been nice to have discussed the various manners one uses various synths and setups.
IE, after 4 hours of IDOW: have a nooby explain how to hook up a basic patch on a modular that is playable. (ex OSC/EG/VCA/MIXER)
Of my friends, they still didn't know how.
The whole concept of CV isn;t really approached, to learn and be creative.
IE, the approach to most modulars is not the same. You really don;t play a System 700 the same way you do a Synthi 100 or Buchla 200.
So I think the basic architecture could have been discussed more for educational benefit.
just my 2 cents.
( I remember calling Rex Probe at Serge after building my first panel in 93 and asked him how to approach it, and he did say well thats half the fun, but it did take a while to learn the system. The same with my Arp 2500 took a few months before I was even able to understand its ways. ) smile jah
Navs
Congratulations to Jason and Robert!

I'm very happy and grateful I got to voice a film on a subject that is close to my heart, despite having to say Mogue and Boo-klaw wink
stromcat
I watched it all through, and want to congratulate the team on their efforts as a tiny two-person operation, it's a wicked achievement and a solid doc.

4 hours straight is a long time to watch anything I think, I broke the viewing up over two evenings. There's a lot of great insight, some of the real vibe of the format - I particularly enjoyed Lori's quest, seeing Dewanatron and the insights into Intellijel's manufacturing process.

I think defenestration has nailed how I felt about it too, I felt that Jason's modular quest was maybe a bit undercooked, we never saw his system and I felt like we didn't really got to the heart of that story. I loved his initial challenge to the productivity/pitfalls of the modular format, the harsh reality that Bruce/Modcan's music making ended when he bought the modular, but didn't feel there was any equally significant resolution to that...it was just Jason wandering around looking at some modulars and saying "I'm going to get one". I would have loved to see a more practical focus on peoples systems themselves too, but appreciate that may be beyond the remit of even a 4 hour doc, and isn't perhaps interesting to a viewer that doesn't actually own a modular.

I would be interested in watching the 'theatrical cut', even my engagement was waning a little 3/4 of the way through part two, and it could be that a tighter, shorter version could concentrate all the most engaging parts of what's there.

This isn't very helpful now that it's done but I have to say I found the voiceover a bit severe in tone. Navs did really great work - it really is a seriously professional and consistent voiceover, but stylistically I never felt it quite gelled with the quirky subject matter. I kept imaging that a west coast american accent, something a bit more relaxed and groovier, would perhaps be a warmer, friendlier fit.

Again congrats to the team for producing such a solid piece of work!
dan_p
Good job, really enjoyable viewing.

Thought you got it all spot on.
suitandtieguy
we posted our review to Twitter as a series of tweets under the hashtag #IDOWtruth if anyone cares to read them.
Pfurmel
Really enjoyed this. I preferred the first half which oddly before viewing, thought I would have felt the opposite.
It seemed for the most part, unbiased and it attempted to base everything on facts(I don't know the entire history of modular so can't say everything was correct).

The second half was good but there were some areas that could have been improved on. Some of the audio was difficult to hear on interviews. It seemed to meander a bit a times. Perhaps it would work better if it was simply a whats what of the happenings in the modern scene as it stands today, without being one mans journey into eurorack.


I would have loved to see more of the DIY legends but I think that is going to be covered elsewhere.

But overall, great work and I am delighted to see something like this come about.
Pfurmel
suitandtieguy wrote:
we posted our review to Twitter as a series of tweets under the hashtag #IDOWtruth if anyone cares to read them.


Really enjoyed those tweets, thanks.
Smokey
I'm a documentary nut and I devour any doc that I think might be interesting. Music documentaries are by far my favorite. I do not own a modular synth but like Jason, have been using old analog synths and drum machines for making my music. My interest in the doc was more for it being a synth doc instead of a modular doc. After seeing it, I really want a Buchla.

Part one was really well done. The narration suited it and I loved seeing all the old synths and collections. I really wish this portion was longer. I could have done without the weird synth graphics too, they just came off a little silly. I'm not sure how much was left on the cutting room floor, but part one really deserves to be a multi-part series, similar to the Ken Burns Jazz series.

Part two was good as well but could have been the bonus features of an extended part one. I enjoyed seeing the designers talk about their work. No longer are these brands nameless manufacturers to me but now I have faces and personalities to associate with the products. Seeing the Dewanatron cousins and the patch-board synth lady was a fun delve into the sound art aspect of the synth community. Solvent's story could have been left out of part two. It didn't really add much. I would have just let the talking heads talk longer...

All in all this was an excellent documentary that will be sure to set the synth-doc standard for years (decades?) to come.

Now that they have reissued the "limited edition" dvds. I really hope they offer the DVD-R box set of extended interviews that they had on their indiegogo page. I'd buy one.
hednoize
Smokey wrote:

Now that they have reissued the "limited edition" dvds. I really hope they offer the DVD-R box set of extended interviews that they had on their indiegogo page. I'd buy one.


As would I. Would happily pay the $200 original asking price.
Smokey
Some more thoughts...

The Electronic Sack Butt! So awesome!

Is the drunk elephant recording that is playing during the segment an old recording of the actual Sack Butt? Or is it an estimate of what it might have sounded like?
s o l v e n t
Smokey wrote:
Some more thoughts...

The Electronic Sack Butt! So awesome!

Is the drunk elephant recording that is playing during the segment an old recording of the actual Sack Butt? Or is it an estimate of what it might have sounded like?


It's an actual recording that we licensed, Hugh Le Caine's "The Sackbut Blues"
emdot_ambient
s o l v e n t wrote:
Smokey wrote:
Some more thoughts...

The Electronic Sack Butt! So awesome!

Is the drunk elephant recording that is playing during the segment an old recording of the actual Sack Butt? Or is it an estimate of what it might have sounded like?


It's an actual recording that we licensed, Hugh Le Caine's "The Sackbut Blues"


Excellent reading material:
The Sackbut Blues: Hugh Le Caine, Pioneer of Electronic Music

Required listening:
(Dripsody, the sound source is one drop of water, played on Hugh Le Caine's pre-Mellotron tape sampler...see pic below)



I was thrilled to see Le Caine mentioned at the very beginning of our journey through modular land. Mr. Green
Smokey
Thanks Solvent and emdot for educating me on Le Caine!

That tape sampler and dripsody recording look and sound amazing. There is just something magical about those old, esoteric machines... I'm very glad the documentary delved into the history a bit deeper than others I've seen.
Tenderlash
I just bought the DVD last weekend and I'm almost through watching it (will finish the last half hour tonight - I'm slow because I'm still watching Breaking Bad lol.. priorities lol) as someone relatively new to modulars, this has been a real eye opener. I have so, so much to learn. Also, I was pleased to see a few faces of people I met last weekend in Asheville and a few faces of people I "met" through facebook smile I have to credit the movie for helping me find this forum. I am quite intrigued by all the new gear out there as well as the vintage gear that's still floating around and being pampered. I can't wait to learn more about modular synths... I had to cringe through the DX7 part talking about the downfall of analog.. as I recently bought a DX7 on a whim (well.. when I was a teenager this was THE synth, so I just wanted one!) This documentary is very well done, well narrated and really just an amazing collection of thoughts and anecdotes from so many pioneers. thumbs up applause
thesnow
Tenderlash wrote:
I just bought the DVD last weekend and I'm almost through watching it (will finish the last half hour tonight - I'm slow because I'm still watching Breaking Bad lol.. priorities lol) as someone relatively new to modulars, this has been a real eye opener. I have so, so much to learn. Also, I was pleased to see a few faces of people I met last weekend in Asheville and a few faces of people I "met" through facebook smile I have to credit the movie for helping me find this forum. I am quite intrigued by all the new gear out there as well as the vintage gear that's still floating around and being pampered. I can't wait to learn more about modular synths... I had to cringe through the DX7 part talking about the downfall of analog.. as I recently bought a DX7 on a whim (well.. when I was a teenager this was THE synth, so I just wanted one!) This documentary is very well done, well narrated and really just an amazing collection of thoughts and anecdotes from so many pioneers. thumbs up applause


dx7 is still a bad ass sounding synth and it did "change the game" at one point so, it's a keeper! thumbs up
s o l v e n t
thesnow wrote:
Tenderlash wrote:
I just bought the DVD last weekend and I'm almost through watching it (will finish the last half hour tonight - I'm slow because I'm still watching Breaking Bad lol.. priorities lol) as someone relatively new to modulars, this has been a real eye opener. I have so, so much to learn. Also, I was pleased to see a few faces of people I met last weekend in Asheville and a few faces of people I "met" through facebook smile I have to credit the movie for helping me find this forum. I am quite intrigued by all the new gear out there as well as the vintage gear that's still floating around and being pampered. I can't wait to learn more about modular synths... I had to cringe through the DX7 part talking about the downfall of analog.. as I recently bought a DX7 on a whim (well.. when I was a teenager this was THE synth, so I just wanted one!) This documentary is very well done, well narrated and really just an amazing collection of thoughts and anecdotes from so many pioneers. thumbs up applause


dx7 is still a bad ass sounding synth and it did "change the game" at one point so, it's a keeper! thumbs up


Really encouraging to hear this, Tenderlash - cool!

Despite the DX7's role in killing off analog when it came out, that doesn't take away from it as a powerful and interesting synth nowadays, if that's a sound you like. I can tell you that IDOW's director Robert purchased a DX7 in order to shoot it for the film, and he's kept it and I know he is quite into it now!
andrewF
Watched the HC edition on the weekend in one sitting
1st half was very enjoyable - well put together and some great vintage footage.
2nd half; it was great to see & hear people that I have only ever communicated with on forums or by email. Probably need to re-watch it as we started to drift off and play with synths and discuss our own synths ....... guess it was only natural.

To sum up: a fucking great doco! Very impressive.
Waz
Is there a digital DL version of this?? I'd like to watch it, but $30 is a bit too much for me. I'm the kind of guy that watches documentaries once and usually never again. I buy most of my content digitally these days.
s o l v e n t
Waz wrote:
Is there a digital DL version of this?? I'd like to watch it, but $30 is a bit too much for me. I'm the kind of guy that watches documentaries once and usually never again. I buy most of my content digitally these days.


We don't offer a digital download of the Hardcore Edition, sorry.
synthiaks
Watched it last weekend and have set aside tomorrow for another session....appreciate all the effort, inspiring.

applause w00t we're not worthy
synthiaks
s o l v e n t wrote:
thesnow wrote:
Tenderlash wrote:
I just bought the DVD last weekend and I'm almost through watching it (will finish the last half hour tonight - I'm slow because I'm still watching Breaking Bad lol.. priorities lol) as someone relatively new to modulars, this has been a real eye opener. I have so, so much to learn. Also, I was pleased to see a few faces of people I met last weekend in Asheville and a few faces of people I "met" through facebook smile I have to credit the movie for helping me find this forum. I am quite intrigued by all the new gear out there as well as the vintage gear that's still floating around and being pampered. I can't wait to learn more about modular synths... I had to cringe through the DX7 part talking about the downfall of analog.. as I recently bought a DX7 on a whim (well.. when I was a teenager this was THE synth, so I just wanted one!) This documentary is very well done, well narrated and really just an amazing collection of thoughts and anecdotes from so many pioneers. thumbs up applause


dx7 is still a bad ass sounding synth and it did "change the game" at one point so, it's a keeper! thumbs up


Really encouraging to hear this, Tenderlash - cool!

Despite the DX7's role in killing off analog when it came out, that doesn't take away from it as a powerful and interesting synth nowadays, if that's a sound you like. I can tell you that IDOW's director Robert purchased a DX7 in order to shoot it for the film, and he's kept it and I know he is quite into it now!


Can't agree enough...the DX7 is an amazing machine and not as scary to tweak as is imagined, plus its super cheap to buy and although sadly my supermax card just died I just popped the old ic's back in and all's ok again.
Jeffcon0
I purchased IDOW off Amazon last week and watched it in one marathon session last night. Just wanted to congratulate the creators on a job well down. As a newbie to the modular world I was engaged throughout. It really conveyed the great sense of community we enjoy on Muff's and was so cool just hearing how passionate the designers were for their products.

I particularly enjoyed the segments with the guy in Toronto who has a recording studio that musicians stop by, the Metasonix stuff (makes we want to get some of his modules), and the guys involved with the Buchla.

Really great stuff. I think my wife thought I was nuts watching a 4 hour doc on synths, though. thumbs up
Electronicaz
This movie made me spend my children's inheritance.
emdot_ambient
Everyone here should go to amazon and post a review. I just submitted mine (5 star). Wrote a big long review.

Probably should have just written: "I laughed. I cried. Two thumbs up. Better than Cats."

hihi
emdot_ambient
Oddly enough, I'm wearing my IDOW Moog t-shirt today. Had someone ask me about it in the cafeteria at breakfast..."Wearing your Moog shirt, eh?"

IDOW was promoted, as was Muff's. thumbs up
s o l v e n t
Cheers Jeffcon0 and emdot_ambient!

And extra thanks for that Amazon review! Funny, Robert (director) said to me the other day that we should call out to other people to post reviews there, since for a long while it was just that 1 single review where the guy says:

"However" I have subtracted 2 stars for the unwarranted and unnecessary bashing of Wendy Carlos. Who happens to be many peoples first exposure to synthesizers. Also I believe the subject could have been shown and celebrated without putting every other type of synthesis down.

Odd conclusion. Some people seem to think that if we included an opinion in the documentary, that it's the film's opinion as well. The quotes used were meant to illustrate a fundamental difference between the East and West coast approaches. For the record we attempted to interview Carlos, and to license some music from Switched On Bach - both requests were refused.

Anyway, again - big thanks for that positive Amazon review - it's a big help!
emdot_ambient
I didn't understand that Carlos comment either. Almost put something about it in my review, but decided it was just best to ignore it. Frankly, I don't recall anything like Carlos bashing in the film.
Needles
'This movie made me spend my children's inheritance.'

This!
thundermouse
I'm very curious to why there's not much mention of CGS or Ken Stone. And no mention of Blacet/Frac? Kind of shitty, especially being kind of the OG in 3u....

Besides that, I loved it! I really did. But needed to delve more into the DIY scene that never really ended, besides the old telephone-operator dealy. I'm sure the Great Grant Richter could of been found to be interviewed!
But I will continue to watch it, again and again.
s o l v e n t
thundermouse wrote:
I'm very curious to why there's not much mention of CGS or Ken Stone. And no mention of Blacet/Frac? Kind of shitty, especially being kind of the OG in 3u....

Besides that, I loved it! I really did. But needed to delve more into the DIY scene that never really ended, besides the old telephone-operator dealy. I'm sure the Great Grant Richter could of been found to be interviewed!
But I will continue to watch it, again and again.


Glad you enjoyed it.

As for "I'm very curious to why there's not much mention of ...." this has come up a lot, and everyone has a different idea of who should've been covered... the point being, it's just wouldn't have been possible to cover everyone. Our time and resources were extremely limited (this was literally a 2-man operation with $ coming 100% through DVD pre-sales - our whole budget was lower than a lot of film's daily catering budget). Getting deep into the DIY scene could've added another hour to the film, easily. I know a lot of people wanted more, but really I think 4 hours is a lot!

If our resources were bigger and we'd followed every lead, we may have still been working on it now. The people you mentioned weren't covered because of their geography, living in areas that we couldn't make it to. We generally chose locations to travel to where we could get a lot of people interviewed, for example NAMM. We had to make every trip count because we could only afford to travel to a few places.
thundermouse
I didn't mean to sound overly critical, I loved it!
waveglider
I think in order to make everyone happy and cover everything, this would need to be a weekly series!
lucid
s o l v e n t wrote:

As for "I'm very curious to why there's not much mention of ...." this has come up a lot, and everyone has a different idea of who should've been covered... the point being, it's just wouldn't have been possible to cover everyone. Our time and resources were extremely limited (this was literally a 2-man operation with $ coming 100% through DVD pre-sales - our whole budget was lower than a lot of film's daily catering budget). Getting deep into the DIY scene could've added another hour to the film, easily. I know a lot of people wanted more, but really I think 4 hours is a lot!

maybe IDOW 2
pfontaine2
I love the documentary but some scenes have a terrible flicker. Was this intentional or do I have a defective copy of the Hardcore Edition?

Incredible work and really appreciated!
dJ dAb
thundermouse wrote:
I'm very curious to why there's not much mention of CGS or Ken Stone. And no mention of Blacet/Frac? Kind of shitty, especially being kind of the OG in 3u....


My thoughts too but I completely understand, due to distance and time constraints of the production... Jason did reach out to me about Frac and I offered my assistance. I also suggested starting a dialog with Scott Lee at PAiA. Unfortunately things didn't go further. Would have loved to seen my preferred format featured cry

btw, back when I got into DIY electronics & modular synths, CGS (Ken Stone), Midwest Analog (Thomas Henry), and Frac Rak - 3U greats PAiA (John Simonton) & Blacet were on top! And, speaking of the 3U game, I thought Euro stuff just felt cheap... and a lot still does. IMO

Great movie regardless!!! Totally appreciate all the hard work that went in into it. SlayerBadger!

FRAC FOREVER!
mousegarden
Er, yeah, it's OK !

No Don Buchla ? Sort of disappointing, would liked to have heard some of his comments on the whole scene. No Wendy Carlos, well, that was expected.
Would liked to have seen more contributions from "street" wigglers, as well as the more well known people. No Brian Eno, but then again, he would have said no probably anyway, not his scene, more into the theoretical's.
I liked the interviews with module makers, that was interesting, didn't like, the DX7 bashing and anti digital stance sometimes, but I guess this is about analogue modular's, so.....but it seemed a little irrational sometimes. All things have a place, and are useful.
On the whole though it's very entertaining, the history side could have gone a bit deeper, but apart from that it does it's job, which for me is turning back the clock, and revisiting those glorious inspiring days when I only dreamt of owning these machines.

MouseGarden.
WozNYC
Received my Hardcore Edition DVD yesterday and watched Part 1. Very enjoyable although I found the BBC-style narrative a bit dry for my tastes. That's just me. Overall, very happy with it.
bassnode
Loved the movie - plan to watch it again soon. Lots of great info packed in there.

My only complaint is that you don't offer a download version. I think you addressed this before by saying it wasn't feasible due to file size and something you didn't want to do because of piracy. Well, I can say the latter is going to happen regardless of what you do. If it's on DVD, it's on PirateBay, et. al.

As for the file size reasoning - is it because of the hosting costs or do you think people wouldn't want to download ~ 10GB of video? If it's the latter, I'd disagree, especially with your target audience (i.e. geeks). For most people, that's a quick download and wouldn't even make a dent in their 1TB drive. As for the hosting/bandwidth costs, you could likely include it in the purchase price, no?

Anyway - just a thought. I was totally gutted (and pretty miffed) when I went to the site with (Paypal) money in hand, ready to download before a long plane flight and was instead forced to buy a DVD.

Great work on the film!
s o l v e n t
bassnode wrote:
Loved the movie - plan to watch it again soon. Lots of great info packed in there.

My only complaint is that you don't offer a download version. I think you addressed this before by saying it wasn't feasible due to file size and something you didn't want to do because of piracy. Well, I can say the latter is going to happen regardless of what you do. If it's on DVD, it's on PirateBay, et. al.

As for the file size reasoning - is it because of the hosting costs or do you think people wouldn't want to download ~ 10GB of video? If it's the latter, I'd disagree, especially with your target audience (i.e. geeks). For most people, that's a quick download and wouldn't even make a dent in their 1TB drive. As for the hosting/bandwidth costs, you could likely include it in the purchase price, no?

Anyway - just a thought. I was totally gutted (and pretty miffed) when I went to the site with (Paypal) money in hand, ready to download before a long plane flight and was instead forced to buy a DVD.

Great work on the film!


Thanks for the kind words!

Hardcore Edition won't be a digital download release. There's more to it than I really want to get into; the download file size is really not the issue - the reasoning is very complicated with several financial/marketing factors involved. We'll do a digital release of the theatrical cut, most likely later this year.
Rongos
Loved it!! love
kd2ajn
Very amazing how many significant people you were able to interview for this film. I would have liked to see even more footage of many of them, but I suppose 4 hours is pretty long already.
Manzanedo
I bought the DVD from Amazon after watching some extended interviews on Youtube. I could be mistaken but it seems that the extended interviews are not included on the DVD. Is this correct? I know it is four hours long, but just curious.
s o l v e n t
Manzanedo wrote:
I bought the DVD from Amazon after watching some extended interviews on Youtube. I could be mistaken but it seems that the extended interviews are not included on the DVD. Is this correct? I know it is four hours long, but just curious.


That's correct. 4 hours was the maximum amount of time that we could fit onto a single dual-layer DVD. We may consider doing a disc of Extended Interviews at some point down the line.
s o l v e n t
kd2ajn wrote:
Very amazing how many significant people you were able to interview for this film. I would have liked to see even more footage of many of them, but I suppose 4 hours is pretty long already.


Cheers! Nobody is more surprised than we are at the caliber of people we managed to get on board for this project. It took me a good 8-12 months of constant digging and emailing to get in touch with everyone. It wasn't easy to get any of the big names until we got Trent Reznor on board, which opened up everything. I couldn't be more grateful for him agreeing to be in our little indie production as it really changed everything once we interviewed him.
raylinds
Well I have watched it twice now and loved every minute of it. I was really into analog synth music back in the late 60s, early 70s, and this was a nostalgia thing for me, but it turned out changing my life. I joined this forum and spent about $4k on a starter Eurorack modular system and am having a blast with it.

I also ordered copies of Switched on Bach and a couple of Mort Subotnick albums and bought the book about the San Francisco Tape Center to learn more about the history of that.

Do you think it influenced me much? It's motherfucking bacon yo
Slabwax
s o l v e n t wrote:
Manzanedo wrote:
I bought the DVD from Amazon after watching some extended interviews on Youtube. I could be mistaken but it seems that the extended interviews are not included on the DVD. Is this correct? I know it is four hours long, but just curious.


That's correct. 4 hours was the maximum amount of time that we could fit onto a single dual-layer DVD. We may consider doing a disc of Extended Interviews at some point down the line.


Please do another Kickstarter for the extended interviews. I'd buy that 4 hours is not enough (maybe for my wife it was).
mousegarden
raylinds wrote:
Well I have watched it twice now and loved every minute of it. I was really into analog synth music back in the late 60s, early 70s, and this was a nostalgia thing for me, but it turned out changing my life. I joined this forum and spent about $4k on a starter Eurorack modular system and am having a blast with it.

I also ordered copies of Switched on Bach and a couple of Mort Subotnick albums and bought the book about the San Francisco Tape Center to learn more about the history of that.

Do you think it influenced me much? It's motherfucking bacon yo


Analog Days by Pinch and Trocco is a good read.

MouseGarden.
s o l v e n t
raylinds wrote:
Well I have watched it twice now and loved every minute of it. I was really into analog synth music back in the late 60s, early 70s, and this was a nostalgia thing for me, but it turned out changing my life. I joined this forum and spent about $4k on a starter Eurorack modular system and am having a blast with it.

I also ordered copies of Switched on Bach and a couple of Mort Subotnick albums and bought the book about the San Francisco Tape Center to learn more about the history of that.

Do you think it influenced me much? It's motherfucking bacon yo


So cool to hear!
The Real MC
Just saw this thread.

Last year it took me a week to get through the four hour HE. When you called it hard core you weren't kidding. I really enjoyed it. It's not a subject with mass appeal and I'm grateful of the labor of love that obviously went into this thing because I'm probably the only musician within an hour drive with this interest. No it doesn't have Buchla, Carlos, Emerson, or all the famous names. But there's enough here to satisfy the gear fetish - modern artists, current makers, gear hounds.

I haven't owned a modular since 1983 (PAiA) and haven't really stayed current with the new gear but it's fascinating to see the renewed interest in modular. If you are into synths in any capacity (not just modular) then this is a great documentary to have. There is not likely to be another DVD like this so grab one while you can.
s o l v e n t
The Real MC wrote:
Just saw this thread.

Last year it took me a week to get through the four hour HE. When you called it hard core you weren't kidding. I really enjoyed it. It's not a subject with mass appeal and I'm grateful of the labor of love that obviously went into this thing because I'm probably the only musician within an hour drive with this interest. No it doesn't have Buchla, Carlos, Emerson, or all the famous names. But there's enough here to satisfy the gear fetish - modern artists, current makers, gear hounds.

I haven't owned a modular since 1983 (PAiA) and haven't really stayed current with the new gear but it's fascinating to see the renewed interest in modular. If you are into synths in any capacity (not just modular) then this is a great documentary to have. There is not likely to be another DVD like this so grab one while you can.


This is really great to hear, thanks! For the record we tried really hard to get an interview with Don, and we came close, but it just never panned out. Wendy Carlos refused outright and was also unwilling to license music from Switched On Bach. Unfortunate - both would've been amazing to include. Cheers for the support
mousegarden
s o l v e n t wrote:
Wendy Carlos refused outright and was also unwilling to license music from Switched On Bach. Unfortunate - both would've been amazing to include. Cheers for the support


It wasn't a "one line" reply was it ? meh
Despite changing my life with her records, and probably being the biggest influence on me, I really can't appreciate her stance on things, it's tainted my view of her, rightly or wrongly. I know she has a right to protect her "property" but it's the way it's done that I find irritating.

MouseGarden.
EdNomi
I watched the documentary twice and I think it's very relaxing.
The IDOW theme is also great and well fitting the subject!

If I weren't already into modular synths it would surely have convinced me of the possibilities.
supersounddesign
s o l v e n t wrote:
The quotes used were meant to illustrate a fundamental difference between the East and West coast approaches.


FWIW I started work on a Modular synth documentary back in 2001 based on the same concept of exploring east coast vs west coast. Also wanted to get Zinovieff in on the action. The first person interviewed was Maggi Payne of Mills College. We went there and got loads of footage of the Buchla, the Moog Modular, and the Orange face Arp 2600, (who's power cord had gone missing). For some reason, we didn't progress any further than that.. It all seemed too gargantuan of a task for our very limited to nonexistent resources. I still have a DV Cam tape of Maggi Explaining the Moog in full detail and us trying to "play" the Buchla..

Ah well glad someone did it! thumbs up
thefutureeaters
Just watched it.
Fascinating, Inspiring and Very Informative.
I think it should be the beginning of a never ending chapter based IDOW series. Couldn't stand that it ended!
Chiffre
I enjoy greatly both parts and documentary lead me here so added benefit!

Congratulation and best wishes.
JLYMN
An amazing doc, still only been halfway through the 4hrs stint of the HE. Very enjoyable to watch and even better for gear drool.

My single most favourite part of this film is Andreas Schneider talking about 5U.
at 7.50 in the trailer - http://vimeo.com/59346477

What a top chap, I want to get out to Berlin and meet this guy.

Great job on the music Solvent and well done to everyone involved!
Smokey
Just finished watching the doc again.

Really really good job fellas. Informative and entertaining. I'm a bit of a documentary (and synth) junkie so I may be a bit biased but... Really great job!

I also have the uncut interviews which are informative and entertaining in it's own way (really appreciate the full Lainhart interview btw. RIP Richard).

Just curious on how the commercial release will differ from the hardcore edition. I'm definitely looking forward to it and wish you the best of luck with it.
s o l v e n t
Smokey wrote:
Just finished watching the doc again.

Really really good job fellas. Informative and entertaining. I'm a bit of a documentary (and synth) junkie so I may be a bit biased but... Really great job!

I also have the uncut interviews which are informative and entertaining in it's own way (really appreciate the full Lainhart interview btw. RIP Richard).

Just curious on how the commercial release will differ from the hardcore edition. I'm definitely looking forward to it and wish you the best of luck with it.


Thank you sir!

To (sort of) answer your question...

(for ease, HCE = Hardcore Edition, IDOW = the feature-length edit)

When HCE was done, the thought of editing it down to make it into IDOW would result in a compromised version, or that it would just pale as a sort of HCE-lite. I mean, I figured it would be better for the uninitiated, but that for anyone who loves the subject matter, IDOW would be too "lite".

But actually, I prefer IDOW to HCE. Substantially. A lot of gold got cut from HCE. So I'm very glad that HCE exists - if we'd have only done IDOW I would've felt that a lot of the material we covered was lost, and that would've been a bummer... but it's out there, it exists, on HCE... However IDOW plays a lot better than HCE - as great as the material is, 4 hours is LONG and it does drag sometimes. I feel that IDOW zips by and feels a lot more cohesive. It was actually so much more work editing it down - making something concise out of so much material was a huge challenge. (Credit goes to Robert BTW).

As far as what is actually different:

- it really gains a LOT from being shorter and more concise - the flow is so much better

- there's a few new quotes & shots added here & there.

- not seen in theaters, but adding for the DVD/digital release: 1 new person/interviewee added! Someone amazing!

- had time to really work on soundtrack placement and I feel the music really helps move the film more effectively now

- big change: we have a different narrator! Actually, we were forced to do this because we needed a Canadian narrator to quality for Canadian Content - we got a broadcast license in Canada and this was required... So we got Patti Schmidt, former host of CBC Radio program Brave New Waves, and current programmer at MUTEK... initially we thought we would just use her for the Can TV broadcast, but her cool, detached tone gives the film a very different feel, and most people seemed to prefer it. Personally I would say that I still prefer Navs' narration, but I think for many, Brits especially, the idea of a BBC homage wasn't as cool as we thought it was. Anyway, Patti's narr definitely gives the film a more serious tone which seems to lend it some "credibility" or something. Plus I like that it differentiates it from HCE.
punkerdood
EdNomi wrote:
I watched the documentary twice and I think it's very relaxing.
The IDOW theme is also great and well fitting the subject!

If I weren't already into modular synths it would surely have convinced me of the possibilities.


I moved from the korg littlebits to a moon modular because of this flick.
punkerdood
Quote:


(for ease, HCE = Hardcore Edition, IDOW = the feature-length edit)

When HCE was done, the thought of editing it down to make it into IDOW would result in a compromised version, or that it would just pale as a sort of HCE-lite. I mean, I figured it would be better for the uninitiated, but that for anyone who loves the subject matter, IDOW would be too "lite".

But actually, I prefer IDOW to HCE. Substantially. A lot of gold got cut from HCE. So I'm very glad that HCE exists - if we'd have only done IDOW I would've felt that a lot of the material we covered was lost, and that would've been a bummer... but it's out there, it exists, on HCE... However IDOW plays a lot better than HCE - as great as the material is, 4 hours is LONG and it does drag sometimes. I feel that IDOW zips by and feels a lot more cohesive. It was actually so much more work editing it down - making something concise out of so much material was a huge challenge. (Credit goes to Robert BTW).

As far as what is actually different:

- it really gains a LOT from being shorter and more concise - the flow is so much better

- there's a few new quotes & shots added here & there.

- not seen in theaters, but adding for the DVD/digital release: 1 new person/interviewee added! Someone amazing!

- had time to really work on soundtrack placement and I feel the music really helps move the film more effectively now

- big change: we have a different narrator! Actually, we were forced to do this because we needed a Canadian narrator to quality for Canadian Content - we got a broadcast license in Canada and this was required... So we got Patti Schmidt, former host of CBC Radio program Brave New Waves, and current programmer at MUTEK... initially we thought we would just use her for the Can TV broadcast, but her cool, detached tone gives the film a very different feel, and most people seemed to prefer it. Personally I would say that I still prefer Navs' narration, but I think for many, Brits especially, the idea of a BBC homage wasn't as cool as we thought it was. Anyway, Patti's narr definitely gives the film a more serious tone which seems to lend it some "credibility" or something. Plus I like that it differentiates it from HCE.


Totally agree 4 hours is a long film, and part two put my father to sleep. He did love part one though. I enjoyed the whole thing, but even found myself going to the land of nod late at night while watching part two. [/quote]
sjessiman
Just picked this up and watched it all the last two days. Very enjoyable, I particularly liked the first part covering the history of modulars, which I admit to not knowing a lot about. I was always into synths as a kid, but I guess it was the move to digital that really got me interested, now I find myself wanting one that fills a room and looks like some crazy science lab.

Seeing the way a lot of these guys got started makes me wish I'd kept an interest in electronics. I used to love the small eletronic kits I had as a kid and remember building a midi interface to control my synth from my commodore 64. That all led me to getting a degree in electrical engineering, but I don't think I ever touched a soldering iron after graduating, I went straight into software development.

Maybe when I get my modular up and running this will get me inspired to try some diy.
Faustgeist
From a beginners perspective...

Loved it! Part 1 was a solid foundation - establishing the time line and concurrent development of the sound.

Part 2 I particularly enjoyed as it related to my new hobby directly - seeing the dreamers and technicians from the companies I am purchasing from. I tend to agree with some earlier posters in that the text identifying who is talking came on a touch late and (as a newbie) I would have likes a touch more text description as to who these folks were. Many were just names on the screen - I feel I missed a few "Omigod!" moments.

Overall, brilliant, inspiring and very re watchable.

I salute you!
~R
mousegarden
Still one of my fave bits is the interview with Trent Reznor, and Allessandro Cortini, Trent really is spot on about the rompler era "where's the piano sound" comment....

MouseGarden
Rotterdam Rebel
Just saw it ,cool stuff for sure, all the info I needed to know, to take the descision to get some of those funky tools..

I am very strongly convinced this whole modular/synth thing is going be huge the next coming years..So just in time to hop on the wagon, thanks for that..

Cheers Guys, good work
mousegarden
Rotterdam Rebel wrote:
Just saw it ,cool stuff for sure, all the info I needed to know, to take the descision to get some of those funky tools..

I am very strongly convinced this whole modular/synth thing is going be huge the next coming years..So just in time to hop on the wagon, thanks for that..

Cheers Guys, good work


Go for it !
Let's hope that it doesn't burn it's self out, it's sort of cool because it's still quite underground, and the sounds you can get are still unusual, especially with all the really cool digital stuff that's around now, don't forget to check out that stuff, people like he Harvestman and others are really taking things forward. If it becomes too popular, as always, the machine itself and it's sounds will become "generic" and the equivalent of punk clothing being sold in Miss Selfridge will happen.

MouseGarden.
Rotterdam Rebel
mousegarden wrote:

Go for it !
Let's hope that it doesn't burn it's self out, it's sort of cool because it's still quite underground, and the sounds you can get are still unusual, especially with all the really cool digital stuff that's around now, don't forget to check out that stuff, people like he Harvestman and others are really taking things forward. If it becomes too popular, as always, the machine itself and it's sounds will become "generic" and the equivalent of punk clothing being sold in Miss Selfridge will happen.

MouseGarden.


Hai Mouse.

Yes I will, dont worry about that wink I like the abstact nature of the machines.
And indeed it is still kind of underground, all things that get too popular and commercial, somehow lose some glamour..But its seems unavoidable, and the "real" artists will always be there..you know..even when sell out is bigtime happening..

That Harvestman I checked sounded fine indeed, I do like the modern digital oscilators, for the smooth side of things..

Cheers RR
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
Rotterdam Rebel wrote:
I am very strongly convinced this whole modular/synth thing is going be huge the next coming years.

Where can I invest?
mousegarden
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
Rotterdam Rebel wrote:
I am very strongly convinced this whole modular/synth thing is going be huge the next coming years.

Where can I invest?


You can always invest in me ? I'm the worlds most successful failure.....

Dead Banana

MouseGarden.
jwfleck
I am about to get back into modular synths after being VERY into them in the 2000-2003 area (Doepfer, Synthesizers.com & MOTM)

I am amazed and delighted that a documentary on this subject exists at all, so I feel somewhat feeble criticizing it too much.

I assume for budgetary/legal reasons no (archival) interview clips with Bob Moog were included. Wendy Carlos would also have been nice. Was Don Buchla already in pretty bad health during production? I assume licensing the rights to existing interview clips with any of these folks might have added up to too much $$$.

Subtitles would be nice.

But hell, I really enjoyed it and if I wasn't already enthused about the current state of modular synthesis, this documentary pushed me well over the edge. I guess I will have to keep playing with AnalogKit on the iPad until I get the money together to start building a new system. (Going to keep it all Eurorack this time around.)

Cheers!
jordanb
Great movie! Loved the live rigs setups of NIN thumbs up
jb001
Brilliant doccy
oberdada
It's been some months since I watched it, so the details are not clear in my recollection. But in general, my impression is that this is a highly flawed documentary.

A good documentary should tell a story and ask critical questions. This one is more like an extended sales pitch. I think Serge would have deserved more coverage. There could have been more focus on the music made with modular, its possibilities as well as its limitations. They could have compared it more extensively with modular software.

What I'd really be interested in is a documentary that would look into the economic side of modulars, or a sociological / anthropological perspective on what drives more and more of us into modular.
mousegarden
oberdada wrote:
It's been some months since I watched it, so the details are not clear in my recollection. But in general, my impression is that this is a highly flawed documentary.

A good documentary should tell a story and ask critical questions. This one is more like an extended sales pitch. I think Serge would have deserved more coverage. There could have been more focus on the music made with modular, its possibilities as well as its limitations. They could have compared it more extensively with modular software.

What I'd really be interested in is a documentary that would look into the economic side of modulars, or a sociological / anthropological perspective on what drives more and more of us into modular.


It was entertaining, I think a social/anthropological doc would be a totally different brief.
One thing I didn't like about it was how some people were portrayed, it was very partisan, either for or against, and we all know that those folks are in reality probably very liberal, and some people, I got the impression, were treated a bit like circus freaks.
oberdada
Spot on, mousegarden! I'll have to remind myself, if I ever watch it again, that those figures that come across as freaks are real people with good and bad sides as everyone else.

Another reason I was not very impressed by it is that almost none of my musical heros were interviewed (and most of them are not famous for working on modulars anyway), possiblly with the exception of Subotnick.
s o l v e n t
mousegarden wrote:

One thing I didn't like about it was how some people were portrayed, it was very partisan, either for or against, and we all know that those folks are in reality probably very liberal, and some people, I got the impression, were treated a bit like circus freaks.


We certainly had no agenda to portray anyone in any unfavourable light. I'd be very curious to hear some specific examples from you that illustrate this.
cftbl
Personally, I thought the various people interviewed came across as themselves. In every case where I've see other interviews of these folks, they've come across very much the same as here.
addendum
Speaking of "light" in the literal sense, I felt that the lighting on Trent & Ali looked much more professional and balanced than on most other interviewees. Did they have it done by some of their own associates (Rob etc) instead of your crew, or what?

Anyway, hope you can take this as constructive feedback - personally I didn't like to see people's facial skin really up close and detailed down to the pores in that reddish/ pinkish glaring lighting. Made them look overexposed (in the metaphorical way - not sure if that's also the technical issue behind what I felt) and hence, not as "cool" as Trent & Ali.

Maybe THAT's even why some viewers felt that the portrayal was uneven? You know, many casual viewers tend to go by the whole of an impression left on them, not analyzing what elements made them feel which way.

(Also, one of the interviewees, whom I won't name here, also has a way of more or less subtly, more or less humorously belittling people next to him. Saw the same thing in other videos of him. That's not a filmmaker's fault, and those other guys seem happy to play along, BUT: the filmmakers can still influence how much of that is emphasized on film - by the position of either guy in the frame, by the cutting rhythm and so on.)


s o l v e n t wrote:
mousegarden wrote:

One thing I didn't like about it was how some people were portrayed, it was very partisan, either for or against, and we all know that those folks are in reality probably very liberal, and some people, I got the impression, were treated a bit like circus freaks.


We certainly had no agenda to portray anyone in any unfavourable light. I'd be very curious to hear some specific examples from you that illustrate this.
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
addendum wrote:
Speaking of "light" in the literal sense, I felt that the lighting on Trent & Ali looked much more professional and balanced than on most other interviewees. Did they have it done by some of their own associates (Rob etc) instead of your crew, or what?


My interview was conducted between about 1 and 3 am in an empty television studio in Toronto. I had flown to Toronto that night and was going to drive to Peterborough, Ontario the next day because I had business in nearby Lakefield. I had been out of town when Robert and Jason were in Vancouver to interview Danjel, and they wanted to sit down with me, so this was the only opportunity to do it. I had been at work all day in Vancouver, then had a 5-hour red-eye flight. I was tired and disheveled and not completely coherent. They picked me up outside my hotel in a van and we went to the studio. It was like we were sneaking in. So yeah, probably not the most ideal of circumstances, but I had fun, and they got some entertaining footage and voice-overs.
mousegarden
s o l v e n t wrote:
mousegarden wrote:

One thing I didn't like about it was how some people were portrayed, it was very partisan, either for or against, and we all know that those folks are in reality probably very liberal, and some people, I got the impression, were treated a bit like circus freaks.


We certainly had no agenda to portray anyone in any unfavourable light. I'd be very curious to hear some specific examples from you that illustrate this.


I think you've either got to go for it or not, with a subject like this, it's a very tricky balance putting "the other side of the coin" I guess it becomes too unwieldy and lengthy if you stray too far away from the main focus.
I thought Trent Reznor said some valid things, but really did belittle Cortini IMO at some points, it made me cringe.
And the people that weren't really into modular I thought were just given a few sound bites, rather than a more probing interview as to their opinions.
Legowelt in particular.
addendum
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
So yeah, probably not the most ideal of circumstances, but I had fun, and they got some entertaining footage and voice-overs.


I'm not recalling your interview right now and my question to solvent wasn't about yours in particular. Nor did I even mention any interviewees' physical or mental state during filming... only the lighting.
wogglebug
Is there an on-demand version of the hardcore edition?

I found a link to the DVD/BluRay version at Synchrotek in a different thread, but it shows "Out of Stock".
s o l v e n t
wogglebug wrote:
Is there an on-demand version of the hardcore edition?

I found a link to the DVD/BluRay version at Synchrotek in a different thread, but it shows "Out of Stock".


No there isn't an On-Demand version and there likely won't be until or distro deals expire in approx 5 years.
g0lem
i just started rewatching... a lot of the statements in those interviews are the sort of stuff that i'd push back in a normal conversation.

This didn't age too well.

Concrete examples include Zen and Oaklander's dude is talking about how special this stuff is while just making a bunch of bleep sounds that aren't even remotely interesting. If you're going to talk about how a Virus is meh, then you better tell me why instead of treating me like a child. Then he goes on talk about having learned through "Trial and error", which is exactly what someone would say who hasn't thought deeply about intentionality and art.

There are too many masturbatory interviews. Some dude going "this moog is gorgeous!" is not worth the time to watch. "You get a lot of bang for the buck" is a statement that should be reserved for an advertisement. Not a documentary.

It is a sort of interesting period piece though. The complaint about modulars being something people get lost in and don't produce much from has been proven categorically false in the past few years.

There is so much good modular music being released by reputable labels (not that it matters); it looks like every show I go to features a modular synth at some point; and these aren't show that necessarily attract muffwiggler types.
s o l v e n t
addendum wrote:
Speaking of "light" in the literal sense, I felt that the lighting on Trent & Ali looked much more professional and balanced than on most other interviewees. Did they have it done by some of their own associates (Rob etc) instead of your crew, or what?

Anyway, hope you can take this as constructive feedback - personally I didn't like to see people's facial skin really up close and detailed down to the pores in that reddish/ pinkish glaring lighting. Made them look overexposed (in the metaphorical way - not sure if that's also the technical issue behind what I felt) and hence, not as "cool" as Trent & Ali.

Maybe THAT's even why some viewers felt that the portrayal was uneven? You know, many casual viewers tend to go by the whole of an impression left on them, not analyzing what elements made them feel which way.


No, it was the same crew (ie, our director Rob) who lighted this, and the rest of the interviews. The lighting situation in Trent's studio may have been more favourable, plus there was always changing situations as far as what kind of equipment - lighting included - that was at our disposal. Varied depending on what we could afford at the time, and also what we could manage to carry. Traveling through Europe for example, with just the 2 of us on trains etc, there was not a lot of lighting equipment that we could manage.

In the years since IDOW, a lot of the gear, and lighting in particular, has become a lot better and MUCH more portable, and you'll def notice an improvement in quality on our next docs ("Electronic Voyager" and "Subotnick" - both nearly ready to move into post-production).

I highly doubt that this is what people are referring to when they complain about unfavourable portrayals etc. IMO most of the critiques I read on forums about IDOW are akin to Dr Suess' "If I Ran the Zoo."
hamildad
g0lem wrote:
. The complaint about modulars being something people get lost in and don't produce much from has been proven categorically false in the past few years.


really?? I'd very much like to see where this has been categorically proved. perhaps at the grand council of Modular Musicians, which I was too busy to attend?

or did everyone get the email... hang on I'll just search my junk folder...
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